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Misha and Bork

  1. profile image0
    Iðunnposted 8 years ago

    Misha, I play a game that it's useful to kill an ogre named Bork daily.  When you get his health halfway down, he calls his little minions to aid him.  They swarm out and say things while they hit you, like "Form a triangle!"  and "Keep it up, lads!" and "We are the collective!"

    The collective bit always makes me think of you. 

    Just wanted to share that.  :p

  2. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    LOL Thank you for thinking of me, even though the context seems a bit awkward big_smile

  3. yoshi97 profile image73
    yoshi97posted 8 years ago

    So ... is Misha the Ogre, or is he part of the collective ... I'm confused too

  4. profile image0
    Iðunnposted 8 years ago

    He's the main enemy.  The collective are his three little helpers.

  5. profile image0
    Iðunnposted 8 years ago

    Misha, my daughter says now that I've mentioned it, she shall be thinking of you everytime she fights the collective too.

    Just know people out here are thinking of you, oddly, while playing Runescape.

    I try to Bork daily but admit I've lapsed.  I have not Borked in almost two weeks actually.  sad  Darn Hubpages. mad

  6. yoshi97 profile image73
    yoshi97posted 8 years ago

    Then Misha is indeed the ogre ... or do I still have it wrong?

    I need to know, so if I someday see him under a bridge I know I will need three pence to cross. smile

    1. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Misha is neither Bork nor the collective.  He is the great fighter of the collective.  Just the word collective to me conjures up Misha now.  hehe.

      1. yoshi97 profile image73
        yoshi97posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Hear that Misha! You're not an ogre! *whew!* Good thing too, as I spent all my passage money on pop rocks and bubble gum.

        1. profile image0
          Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          don't drink cokes right after the pop rocks.  O.O

  7. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    LOL Looks like I am getting popular in your family smile

    1. yoshi97 profile image73
      yoshi97posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Either that, or they live on the other side of the bridge you are guarding and wish to insure safe passage. smile

      1. profile image0
        Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        haha!

    2. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      you've stayed popular with my family.  smile

  8. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 8 years ago

    OH!  I thought this was about Misha and the pop star Bork, wink.  She's kinda cute, after all...

    1. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      ah, you're thinking of bjork.  yeah she is a little doll.  she was great in "dancer in the dark".

  9. Eric Graudins profile image60
    Eric Graudinsposted 8 years ago

    Nah, you've all got it wrong.
    Misha's relationship to Bork is through his favourite TV character, the Swedish chef from the Mupppets.

    Like the chef, Misha also sings Bork, Bork, Bork as he  creates disasters in the kitchen. lol lol

    1. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I had forgotten that!  lol.  great input.

    2. yoshi97 profile image73
      yoshi97posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      anyone remember Beaker and the professor in Muppet labs? Ah ... the poor little guy. sad

      A while back they had a funny video of beaker ... I wish I could remember where it was. Dag nabbit ... I hate it when you get old enough to forget more than you once knew sad

      1. profile image0
        Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I love Beaker and his little voice.  One of my children can do that voice and it's too too cute.

  10. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    LOL not that I know anybody but Elmo out of these guys, and Bjork is nowhere near my favorite artist. big_smile

    But at least I got the association finally, and I have to say that your are dead wrong tongue I don't really fight collectives per se, I enjoy those that form voluntarily and don't have a steep exit fee. wink

    1. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      have you ever read kosinski's semi-autobiographical account of how he escaped the soviet union or maybe it was soviet controlled poland? it was called Cockpit, I believe.  you might enjoy it.

    2. yoshi97 profile image73
      yoshi97posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      So we can quote ya as not liking the mafia then ...

      *Guido, get me a horse from the stable ... we gotta make a stop over at Misha's house and let him know the Godfather is very disappointed he has decided not to join in his ranks*

  11. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    Never heard of him/her. Considering I did not read a book in several years, chances of me reading it are slim smile

    1. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      lol always so honest.

      I'm a huge reader and a great fan of jerzy kosinski. 

      his bio is that he was a displace WWII baby who ended up in a Stalinist run country.  He used the red tape and a great deal of ingenuity to escape the Soviet bloc and engineer an escape to flee to America.  He wed a rich widow and wrote some rather intriguing novels, semi-autobiographical in nature, then killed himself later.  He wanted liberty but all he found here was money and death.  he never got past the trauma of poland during WWII.

  12. Misha profile image77
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    LOL At least trying to tongue

    I think quite a few people found a huge disillusionment after moving to USA since WWII till now. No longer it is a land of free... sad

    1. ledefensetech profile image72
      ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Heck Misha, a lot of Americans are disillusioned.

      1. Misha profile image77
        Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Yeah, but it is not THAT hard on Americans, it is much harder on emigrants who went through unimaginable difficulties to escape from their unfree country to supposedly free and and here find out that all the effort and suffering was in vain...

        1. profile image0
          Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          it wasn't so great for everyone even back then.  ayn rand's sister hated america and fled back to russia.

        2. ledefensetech profile image72
          ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Perhaps not Misha.  People may wake up one day, perhaps even soon.  They did back in your homeland did they not?

    2. profile image0
      Iðunnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      we are considerably less free than we used to be, yes and the economic possibilities are sinking.  this isn't the place now for people to come to to get rich quick.  we're sinking.  even the mexicans have started going home.

  13. yoshi97 profile image73
    yoshi97posted 8 years ago

    Unfortunately, the American dream became a thing of the past when we allowed ourselves to become rooted heavily into an industrial culture. Now, we find many of our jobs disappearing to third world countries blossoming into industrial ages of their own and eager to work for wages we can not.

    We need a renaissance, where we all go high tech. Unfortunately, it's not easy to swing the school systems in the needed direction to give our children a chance to learn the skills needed to stay ahead of the worldwide curb.

    Let's face it ... Our high schools have been preparing our kids for farming and factory work for many years and neither guild is what it used to be. That's where the American dream disappeared.

    Thankfully, I spent many years educating myself, aware that I would need to someday find something other than factory work ... and I escaped the despair many former factory workers are feeling today.

    RIP American dream ... may they soon resurrect it from the very soil they buried it beneath.


    As for land of the free ... it's not more a case of 'land of the watched over', but only because we stretch our hands out and place them into too many hornet nests, seemingly unaware that the sting of a few hurt, but the sting of many can be quite deadly.

    We need to go back to our pre-World War II philosophy of watching over America and allowing the rest of the world to watch out for itself. The attack on Pearl Harbor made us believe we were wrong to isolate ourselves, and for that moment in time they were right, as a dictator by the name of Hitler sought to rule the world.

    That man is now dead, we must remember that ... now is a time for peace ... only then will there be prosperity in America again.

    1. ledefensetech profile image72
      ledefensetechposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      So wait, what you're saying is that by advancing to an industrial age, we somehow made a mistake and they way to correct that mistake is to advance again.  Well, that certainly is a different argument that most I see out there.

      It's not a pre-WW II but a pre-Spanish American War stance we need to go back to.  No involvement outside our borders at all.  Our military should be only used to protect the territorial integrity of the US.  Of course then the Navy and possibly Air Force would become the senior services, but that's neither here nor there.

      1. yoshi97 profile image73
        yoshi97posted 8 years agoin reply to this
  14. profile image0
    Iðunnposted 8 years ago

    sgree completely and well written. 

    I shall mourn the American dream with you.

 
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