Are we going too far?

Jump to Last Post 1-9 of 9 discussions (9 posts)
  1. peeples profile image93
    peeplesposted 5 years ago

    Are we going too far?

    Elementary school children suspended for eating poptarts into gun shapes, bringing butter knives to school with their lunch, or for playing with bubble guns in kindergarten. At what point is it going too far? Are we overreacting to what use to be considered normal childhood behavior?
    BTW- I am aware the photo is a joke and didn't actually happen.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7765308_f260.jpg

  2. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
    Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years ago

    Yes! I hesitate to say anything against the recognition and awareness of violence and gun-related issues in the midst of all the controversy and recent tragedies. I think we are in for some ugly times but I also think we can be doing more damage than good. I have a 12 year old son and 8 year old daughter; I was very unsure of how I wanted to handle the Sandy Hook tragedy with them. There was a part of me that didn’t want to bring it to their attention, why share the ugly tragedy with them. Then I realized that it was way too publicized and they would probably be hearing about it from someone else anyway, so I’d rather be the one to handle how they found out and what kind of details they needed. It was not an easy conversation. I did not give any major details and I focused on the main factor being that it was a matter of someone being mentally-ill and untreated. I reassured them that this is not normal behavior and things like this don’t happen regularly. I don’t want my children to be afraid to go to school; I don’t want them to be afraid of life, though I must admit I fear enough for both of them. Sometimes we point out too much of the “ugly” to our children and in a sense we are compromising their carefree innocence.  I also think that we are running the risk of putting inappropriate ways of thinking in children’s heads way before they would’ve otherwise been capable of thinking that route. The more we point out the violence and turn everything into something, the more children are going to start making their own correlations. A cloud is a cloud and a Pop-Tart is a Pop-Tart. I played with squirt guns and little western pistols and all kinds of little guns growing up in the 80’s. I’m 30 now and have yet to shoot a real gun. Kids deserve to be kids.

  3. Jeannieinabottle profile image90
    Jeannieinabottleposted 5 years ago

    Hahahaha... yes, we have gone too far.  That photo is pretty hilarious though.  It just goes to show you see whatever you like in clouds.  I personally see Snoopy.  :-) 

    I remember playing with water guns when I was child and I am in no way a violent criminal.  I don't own a gun, nor would I ever wish to do so.  For violent children with issues, yes, maybe they should be suspended for talk about guns or threats, but for little kids with Hello Kitty bubble guns, they need to calm down.  I'm a grown woman and I wouldn't mind having a Hello Kitty bubble gun... that sounds like fun!

  4. lburmaster profile image82
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    What are bubble guns? Yes, it's going to far and it's really kind of funny that people feel threatened just about those little toys. I'm not sure what is a more pathetic idea. The fact that the school is that threatened of toys or they want constant, strict control.

  5. Seeker7 profile image93
    Seeker7posted 5 years ago

    Yes, that is going too far - sounds very much like paranoia. Of course be aware and take sensible precautions, but I bet if these school principles asked proper gun safety guys what they thought about banning the kids, they would laugh!!

    I loved the photo and I definately see a gun!

  6. MizBejabbers profile image91
    MizBejabbersposted 5 years ago

    We are definitely going too far. We are to the point that we may as wrap our kids in bubble wrap before we send them out of the house. I think some of it is a matter of control by control freaks. I certainly don't think real or even toy guns are appropriate in school, but Arkansas has just passed a law allowing school personnel to carry guns on campus. If some kid in one of those schools points a gun-shaped pop tart at a teacher legally packing heat, I shudder to think what might happen. I afraid we've all gone nuts! Loved your photo.

  7. RBJ33 profile image61
    RBJ33posted 5 years ago

    Hey peeples - Hell YES we go too far.  Zero tolerance policies need to be adjusted to include good old common sense.  I see yesterday that an 8 year old girl was handcuffed and taken from school because she was throwing a tantrum - what;s wrong with that picture.  We are a society of over-reaction instead of action.  It troubles me what these little kids of today will grow thinking.

  8. junkseller profile image84
    junksellerposted 5 years ago

    Normal doesn't ever really stay the same. Adult behavior isn't the same as it used to be either. I am always amazed by the number of people I see, or hear talking about, using guns as if they were toys. Just the other day I saw a uniformed US Army Colonel pointing a real gun at a buddy as a joke simply for a cool photo opportunity. Somewhere I think we have developed a serious cultural problem related to guns. They aren't toys.

    That doesn't necessarily mean it makes sense to bust poptart sculpting kids, but I do think we have a problem. Personally I think it's a lot of adults who are in order for a spanking.

  9. profile image0
    KEPitzposted 5 years ago

    Yes, I think we've definitely gone too far with the paranoia and fear. Soon, the country will be in a blind panic and that won't be a good thing for anyone. It's really kind of scary to think about.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)