jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (7 posts)

Should google ads on our hubs link to landing pages describing the precise produ

  1. cam8510 profile image95
    cam8510posted 5 years ago

    Should google ads on our hubs link to landing pages describing the precise product in the hub ad?

    I just looked at one  and after quite a few minutes perusing the ad page, I still have no idea what the ad on my site is attempting to sell.  I depend on google ads to make money here on HP.  We are encouraged to produce quality content.  Google should be required to do the same.  If I, as the hub author, can't figure out what an ad on my hub is trying to sell, you can bet the average reader isn't going to figure it out either, because they won't be nearly as motivated as I was.  Ads on our hubs should lead to very clear landing pages for that precise product and not to a product catalog.

  2. mattforte profile image92
    mattforteposted 5 years ago

    Google doesn't control what is on the landing page. They also aren't here to police things like that. It is an AD - a space somebody paid to have delivered to viewers. It doesn't need to be trying to sell anything. Hell, I could buy advertising space for one of my HubPages articles if I wanted to, and have it be nothing but an informative article if I wanted. It doesn't matter what's on the landing page. You are getting paid to display it - paid for views, and paid even more for clicks. What the reader experiences after clicking on said ad is not, and should not be any of your concern since you've already made the maximum profit at that point.

    Also, from what I am reading - you are stating that you just clicked one of your own ads. Even if it was for "investigative purposes" I'd be careful - that is exactly what will lead to your AdSense account getting banned. (And without AdSense..you get no HubPages ad earnings either)

    1. cam8510 profile image95
      cam8510posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for the information.  I am aware about not clicking on my own adds.  It was a momentary memory lapse that happens more with each birthday.  I could have used the info without the bit of an attitude I sensed coming through. Thank you though.

    2. mattforte profile image92
      mattforteposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm kind of a jerk, so I often come across with an attitude. That or a lot of sarcastic humor. However, I see a lot of bad information on this site fluffed up with "helpful sounding" comments which I find detrimental, so I just try to be forward ;-)

    3. cam8510 profile image95
      cam8510posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Mattforte, Thank you.  Communicating by writing has the disadvantage of no body language.  Sorry I misinterpreted.  Thanks for helping out.

  3. profile image0
    paxwillposted 5 years ago

    The company who paid for the ad will probably realize soon enough that their vague ad isn't converting into sales, and perhaps then they'll change it.  Google doesn't necessarily reject ads for being confusing and poorly constructed, but for being deliberately deceiving.

    Your only recourse is to flag the ad (there's a little Adsense button or link there somewhere) and fill out the report explaining to Google why you feel the ad is inappropriate.  You can cite the fact that the ad is confusing.  Then maybe Google will contact the company that paid for the Adwords campaign and that company will change their ad. 

    I feel you on the dumb ads.  I've reported a few to Google that had riduculous misspellings.

    1. cam8510 profile image95
      cam8510posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      paxwill, Thank you for that information.  I may flag that one, but I wouldn't have known how misleading it was without actually clicking it, which is a no no.

 
working