Share your thoughts on multitasking

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  1. Blue and Gray profile image81
    Blue and Grayposted 18 months ago

    Hello Everyone!

    I'm curious as to how you manage your time considering that some of you here work part-time. Do you multitask? If yes, how?

    1. Readmikenow profile image95
      Readmikenowposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      I am not good at doing more than one thing at a time.  My wife can be listening to a book, cooking dinner and watching the news on television and keep everything straight.  I can only do one thing at a time.  I'm good at disciplining myself to do what I have scheduled.  I think about time limits and put them on the schedule.  I can do many things as long as I follow my schedule.

  2. Kierstin Gunsberg profile image98
    Kierstin Gunsbergposted 18 months ago

    This is actually my PT job which I do from home while caring for my kids and going to school. It's a juggling act, especially because I don't think my family takes me seriously because I do everything (school, writing) from home. To them, it looks like I'm just playing on my computer when I'm not paying attention to them.

    Yet, I make as much writing from home here on HubPages as my husband does at his second job outside the home, so it's not like I'm sitting around doing nothing.

    I'm just sitting around working while flagging 10,000 questions from my husband and kids while still managing to write somewhat coherently and pass my classes.

    My best advice for multitasking is to prioritize certain things for certain days of the week so that you always know what you're doing when you wake up and you're not scrambling to catch up on anything.

    Also, if you have family at home, stick your earbuds in when you're writing. You don't even have to listen to anything, it just tricks them into thinking you're not listening and leaving you alone to work like they would if you were at an out-of-the-house job.

    1. Blue and Gray profile image81
      Blue and Grayposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      that's good to hear. What I'm curious about your situation is how you manage to have a focused mindset despite the constant distractions that you experience at home.

  3. janshares profile image94
    jansharesposted 18 months ago

    Yes, I'm in constant multi-tasking mode. However, I think it's over-rated. I actually wrote a poem hub about how it doesn't work. Most of the time, I forget something, important things fall at the waste side, and too often, I'm moving like Speedy Gonzales (telling my age). Unfortunately, because we are so busy wearing many hats, we have no choice but to multi-task to get it all done. My biggest challenge is memory issues which come with age. What helps is writing things down. I have little writing tablets with lists, calendars, and post-its all over the place. All we can do is our best and let some things go.

    1. janshares profile image94
      jansharesposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Oops, "wayside." Perfect example of memory issues. Ho hum.

    2. Blue and Gray profile image81
      Blue and Grayposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Wow thank you. Actually I just wrote an article on how multitasking can actually hurt your brain in the long run (you can read it in my profile). But overall, I agree with you that multitasking promotes memory loss especially during classroom discussion. I'm a student, and I make sure that I focus on a single task before doing another one.

      1. janshares profile image94
        jansharesposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Excellent! I'll check out your article.

        1. janshares profile image94
          jansharesposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Just read your article. Nice! My poem hub and your informative hub should be linked!

          1. Blue and Gray profile image81
            Blue and Grayposted 18 months agoin reply to this

            will check your poem hub. Maybe you can link my article in your poem and I will link your poem in my hub. smile Just read your comment. Thank you for the feedback. I really appreciate it.

  4. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 18 months ago

    I do it all the time. I switch whenever something starts feeling like work. Net result is I end up taking a break from work by doing other work; which ends up getting all the work done, without any of it seeming like work at all.

    I am also very big on to-do lists. Always a glorious feeling when checking an item off.

    1. Blue and Gray profile image81
      Blue and Grayposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Interesting scheme. I want to try it. Do you have some tips?

  5. Kenna McHugh profile image90
    Kenna McHughposted 18 months ago

    When I was in college, I had a job as a short-order cook.  I have multi-tasked ever since. I love it and would not stop. I love getting lots of stuff done in one day. I used to be contracted with Demand Media Studios. I was a talent producer and loved it because I oversaw many projects in one week. When one was completed, I got paid, and it was rewarding.

    Multi-tasking as a writer is different because I concentrate on each piece until done. There are times when I leave an article because I can't focus on it anymore (I am stumped or it isn't flowing) and come back to it after working on another article.

    Everyone is different and they all have their own way of doing what works for them. The key is to find what works for you and keep at it.

  6. Cre8tor profile image97
    Cre8torposted 18 months ago

    I work full-time. Sure I don't produce as many hubs here but I've integrated the 2 and carry a note pad just about everywhere. Then when I have time to uni-task, I sit down and enter notes onto HP.

  7. Chriswillman90 profile image96
    Chriswillman90posted 18 months ago

    Humans are not biologically built to multi-task, at least according to its definition. They can only properly focus on two things in very short intervals, and most people have trouble with that.

    But I don't think that's what you meant. Humans can take on multiple tasks over the course of a day, and most of us do just that. Personally I like to segment my tasks with a 2-3 hours dedicated to writing/editing, another 2-4 dedicated to other freelance gigs, and another 3-5 for part-time work.

    Maybe if this whole Maven/Hubpages deal turns out to be a success, then I could dedicate more time to this site.

    1. Blue and Gray profile image81
      Blue and Grayposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Actually i just wrote an article regarding the negative effects of multitasking. Im just crowdsourcing opinions and experiences of people. It's nice to read different approaches to tackle daily errands. Anyways, thank you for sharing your thoughts. I myself have a planner on a daily basis but sometimes have problems sticking with it.

  8. lobobrandon profile image89
    lobobrandonposted 18 months ago

    Me: 90% procrastination, 10% work. I call this a good day smile

    But my mind is always at work while procrastinating too, helps me do things in a better way at the end.

    1. DrMark1961 profile image98
      DrMark1961posted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Funny, my mind is always procrastinating when I have work.

      1. lobobrandon profile image89
        lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Yup smile

  9. Jessie L Watson profile image93
    Jessie L Watsonposted 18 months ago

    I use a modified version of the Pomodoro technique if I get into a pinch.

    Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNBmG24djoY

    1. lobobrandon profile image89
      lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      I use it too when I really really need to get something done. How do you modify it though?

      1. Jessie L Watson profile image93
        Jessie L Watsonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Just different time intervals. Instead of going 25 minutes I usually go 20.

        Also, I use it for studying when I have a stack of books. I go 20 minutes, reflect on the reading for 5, then keep cycling until I've studied for 2 hours. That's about all people can really handle. Unless you're some sort of wunderkind, people typically can't study for 5 hours a time.

        But if you're able to study and absorb information for 2 hours a day, that's 10 hours of pure studying a week. That's about 1/3 to 1/2 of the time average students need to spend getting their stuff done. It's more cognitively effective and more time effective.

        1. lobobrandon profile image89
          lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Cool. Thanks for sharing.

      2. Jessie L Watson profile image93
        Jessie L Watsonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        I would also recommend listing all the tasks in your life that can fit into a 20-25 minute bracket.

        Ex. Dishes, Laundry, Paperwork, Phone calls, Balancing Checkbook, etc etc.

        1. lobobrandon profile image89
          lobobrandonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          I put those into the 2 minute rule. If it can be done in two minutes do it immediately (that is as long as you are not interrupting another task). But I rarely follow this rule myself smile I try to.

          1. Jessie L Watson profile image93
            Jessie L Watsonposted 18 months agoin reply to this

            Cheers to that!

  10. Ben716 profile image91
    Ben716posted 18 months ago

    I am a full-time tutor at a middle-level ECDE college. I find time to research and write articles during the evening, at night or early morning at 4am, or during weekends if I am free. At least, I manage to write less than five articles a month. Add to that procrastination, sometimes I 'beat' myself for letting good ideas get hold of dust on the shelves. Not fair at times.

  11. Mamerto profile image93
    Mamertoposted 18 months ago

    It's a bad idea. The concept of multitasking is to finish several tasks at the same time. In reality you will end up with several substandard results and a migraine. When doing your job you need focus. And how can you focus if you are thinking of another job while you tackle another one.

 
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