I propose the establishment of a new Award. "You Can't Fix Stupid"

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  1. Don Bobbitt profile image95
    Don Bobbittposted 16 months ago

    Honestly, on one hand, I do enjoy the relatively FREE PRESS position of HubPages. Over my 9 years here, I feel I can state that HP is a pretty good place for all of us Hubbers to post our opinions on a wide variety of subjects.
    But, one thing I have learned is that often, sometimes too often, I see totally ridiculous short posts from a person that seems to express unbelievable opinions on silly subjects.
    OK, OK, I'm not thinking of proposing some kind of limitation to our free press rights.
    But, I do want to propose that we establish an award for certain of the more radical statements from some Hubbers.
    Usually, when I see some really, what I consider, STUPID statement from someone, I don't proliferate it by commenting. Rather, I refrain and just watch as others comment in an effort to explain just how stupid their statement was.
    Myself, I don't want to call someone stupid in front of our Hubber audience, so I just chew on my pencil (so to speak) and read on even though I consider the other person's ridiculous writing to be stupid.
    Now to my point, I propose the placement of a button where a reader can press it and a counter is incremented for that Hub.
    If the counter hits a set number (12? 100? ???) a badge is placed next to the title of the Hub. The button should simply be labeled; "YOU CAN'T FIX STUPID".
    I think this would not only be entertaining for the rest of my fellow Hubbers, but it would be a type of warning to the Hub writer that they should go back and reconsider their Hub along with how they expressed their opinion.
    Just Saying!
    DON

    1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 16 months agoin reply to this

      How about a similar one for the dumbest questions people submit.  I've had some real whoppers!

      1. Jean Bakula profile image94
        Jean Bakulaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        I get ridiculous questions. Lately, it's been trendy for married people to write me to ask me if they are compatible. If they are married, shouldn't they know? I used to try to interpret, but lately I hit delete on most of them.

        1. ziyena profile image92
          ziyenaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          lol!

      2. Don Bobbitt profile image95
        Don Bobbittposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        LOL! Certainly! In fact we could probably evolve our list useful buttons to maybe a dozen specific responses.
        DON

  2. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 16 months ago

    Could be fun and definitely the badge would only be displayed to signed-in users.

    You do know that every trafficked political hub would get this badge?

    e.g.:
    Every Republican hub after the Democrats are through with it.
    Every Democrat hub after the Republicans are through with it.
    big_smile

    1. Don Bobbitt profile image95
      Don Bobbittposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      Yeah, you're probably right, but what Fun it would be when you read an obviously "STUPID" submission by someone to just place a tag on it that expresses some lone reader's (yours) opinion of its content.
      In our present age of extreme Political Correctness, just being able to press that anonymous button would be a great outlet for many of us.
      And as I think about it, the number of button pushes would average out to something for the writer to consider.
      So what if the average button pushes for the world of Hubs is say 10 (or 100 or 1000???), and your article is riding near that average??
      Oh, Well, it was just an idea for us to use and avoid arguments while use\ing a more civilized way to critique certain Hubs. I think it could read to more Hubs being read actually!!
      DON

  3. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 16 months ago

    It is just a sign of how ignorant some people are - sad but true.

    1. MizBejabbers profile image90
      MizBejabbersposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      Unfortunately, those are the ones who think they're so smart!

      1. lobobrandon profile image87
        lobobrandonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        Yup. This right here people.

    2. Don Bobbitt profile image95
      Don Bobbittposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      Kenna - I believe the majority of our population no longer reads or cares about "signs". The only "signs" deemed significant enough to be responded to in today's society are displayed on a Smart Phone screen!
      DON

    3. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      There have always been stupid, ignorant people, but never so many before our politicians started dumbing down our schools.  I was there as a teacher in the mid 80's and watched it happening.  I knew then that we were in trouble. You cannot have a society of thinking people if you don't teach them how to think!

  4. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 16 months ago

    Yes. Their doors are locked tight and there is no way they are willing to unlock them, open them, and enjoy the fruits of willing to know.

  5. psycheskinner profile image85
    psycheskinnerposted 15 months ago

    I think our population still wants to look down on people for arbitrary age-related reasons.  iPhones are just this generation "devil's music".  Go back a bit further and eating sugar-candy was making us all moronic degenerates. Before that it was probably new fangled cave paintings.  People are the same now as they have ever been, which is to say, pretty judgmental,

  6. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 15 months ago

    It starts with one kid and helping them learn how to study not memorize or rotely learn, but to understand what they are learning so they can apply it in life.  There are schools that follow this method - Learning How to Learn. For that matter, there are other counties that use this method.

    I helped my daughter with her studies, and she is a Straight-A student. Her college professors are impressed with her smart writing.

    1. psycheskinner profile image85
      psycheskinnerposted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Do any schools emphasis rote learning any more, I thought that was a thing of the past. I agree that curiosity and knowing how to solve problems is far more important than learning facts.

    2. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      As a teacher I never followed the guidelines set forth from our county because I knew they were BS.  I integrated creative thinking into my lesson plans, and my students thrived.  These days if parents don't have the time or ability to teach their kids how to think and analyze, those kids will never grow up to understand their lives and the roles they play in the world.  Once the politicians took over, it was game over, and it has only gotten worse.  The irony of it all is that thinking and analyzing are learned skills, and it takes very little time to teach them.  Real Pity.

  7. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 15 months ago

    Rote learning and memorization are still happening because kids are tested. Look at the standardized testing, multiple choice questions.

    There are projects and other methods for getting kids away from studying for a test. The grade is based on percentages 30% tests/ 30% projects/ 40% participation (as an example.)

    1. Jean Bakula profile image94
      Jean Bakulaposted 15 months agoin reply to this

      My son was an elementary school teacher for 4 yrs. He hated the lack of creativity, the rote learning, and the way the teachers all had to teach to the standardized tests. He felt it was all so dumbed down too. Also, the parents bully the teachers. He said he learned everything he knew from his father and I. We were always readers. I used to look at his college work, and it was all information I covered back in High School. It's a shame what our educational system has become. The teachers are lazy, and they don't get well paid. Plus our culture doesn't respect learning the way other ones do.

  8. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 15 months ago

    Nowadays, the educational establishment is quick to label kids instead of teaching them. It's bare cold fact the mental health industry sucks. Remove them and their colorized screen of lies and half-truths and education will do so much better like it used to be.

  9. theraggededge profile image97
    theraggededgeposted 15 months ago

    Teaching is so overrated big_smile My kids were unschooled and allowed to follow their own interests. I encouraged them to teach themselves. Youngest is 17 and just applying for university after two years of college. We got her interim college report yesterday - straight As in everything pertaining to her course.

    1. lobobrandon profile image87
      lobobrandonposted 15 months agoin reply to this

      You are in the UK. Dumbing down is not a thing there, yet. Luckily big_smile

      1. theraggededge profile image97
        theraggededgeposted 15 months agoin reply to this

        I'm afraid it is sad We gave up with school when our six year old son's teacher refused to give him reading books appropriate to his ability in order to hold him back to 'keep him level with his peers'. Took him out and he read the first Harry Potter a year later. My kids aren't extra-special clever by any means. But they have never lost the love of learning that toddlers have naturally.

        1. lobobrandon profile image87
          lobobrandonposted 15 months agoin reply to this

          Ah, I see. That's a pity.

    2. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Yes, but they obviously were lucky to have an intelligent, thinking parent...but how many do?  Parents these days have come through the system so haven't learned thinking skills themselves...so removing them from schools doesn't always work out.

      1. theraggededge profile image97
        theraggededgeposted 15 months agoin reply to this

        You are right up to a point. Both my partner and I came through the system and our older children went that way also. However, there is always time to learn another way. And we did learn lots alongside the children.

        I found that I didn't need to know stuff in order to contribute to their education. We could find out as we went along. It was most fun, exasperating, and rewarding way of life. We didn't have much money because I had to work from home (like now) but it was worth it.

        1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
          TIMETRAVELER2posted 15 months agoin reply to this

          My point exactly.  You found the answers because you were intelligent and creative, but many among us do not have those skills, unfortunately.

  10. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 15 months ago

    I am fortunate to have friends who were hands on parents. They're kids are now responsible adults. They didn't bank on the educational system.

    1. theraggededge profile image97
      theraggededgeposted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Ooh... I much prefer the hands-off approach big_smile Let them get on with it, I say. Sharp tools and climbing trees encouraged. Free range children.

      I'm sort of joking with you, but I really do believe that children need to find their feet in the world. We're not here to stop them hurting themselves but to pick them up and dust them down afterwards. And that goes for any age.

      We found that treating them with respect resulted in them treating us, others, and their environment similarly. Good manners don't require teaching, they require modeling. Like parent, like child.

  11. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 15 months ago

    Yes. It is unfortunate.

  12. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 15 months ago

    I, too, worked from home. Dusting them off is the best moments in my life.

  13. john000 profile image96
    john000posted 15 months ago

    Not sure this is a good idea. A "you can't fix stupid badge" might hinder the stupid from future commenting. Think what would happen to the economy!

    1. lobobrandon profile image87
      lobobrandonposted 15 months agoin reply to this

      lol

  14. Don Bobbitt profile image95
    Don Bobbittposted 15 months ago

    LOL!
    DON

 
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