Keep New Articles Offline Until...

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  1. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks ago

    ... Published on a NIche Site.

    If HP were to not publish new articles until accepted by a niche site, writers might be more inclined to give HP the first right of refusal for newly written material. Leastwise, I would.

    As things stand now, HP effectively destroys the SEO of newly submitted material by automatically publishing it on the hubpages . com domain. If the new article is declined for a niche site; the author has lost the option of publishing it anywhere else, what with Google now considering such publication would be a duplicate (even though since deleted from hubpages . com by author).

    If this "sabotage" action was removed, I personally would be more than happy to give HP first shot at new material, as opposed to my current procedure of being afraid and just skipping HP and directly publishing on my own site instead.

    In other words, I'd like to be able to submit to HP first and then publish on my own website only the articles that HP doesn't want.

    Postscript. Regarding your traffic-attracting abilities and your Ad Program; the word, "Awesome", really does apply here. I don't know how you do it.

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
      TessSchlesingerposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

      Question: Does your site get more traffic? The reason I've never been interested in having a site (although I'm getting one now for my books) is that I just wouldn't get any traffic.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image89
        paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        Thanks to HP, I've become skilled at SEO like you wouldn't believe. I find little presents on my back porch literally everyday from AdSense. The bad news is when one does the math, it does not even approach minimum wage; the day it is no longer fun is the day I am gone.

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
          TessSchlesingerposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

          Yeah, that's what I rather thought. sad

    2. lobobrandon profile image88
      lobobrandonposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

      Each niche site has guidelines and you can see some hubs on the niche site (see the popular ones) to get an idea of what goes and what doesn't. There is no reason that every hub you write is not moved.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image89
        paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        If HP wants to enter the big leagues, HP needs to have a procedure that does not SEO destroy declined articles. Otherwise, authors are afraid to submit.

  2. RonElFran profile image96
    RonElFranposted 7 weeks ago

    I'm not sure how publishing on hubpages.com destroys an article's SEO. If it's not moved to a niche site, you just unpublish it, then use Google Webmaster Tools to remove it from search. That usually takes effect within a couple of days. The same applies to Bing. You can then republish with no fear of it being marked duplicate content.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image89
      paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

      Once something hits the net, it's there forever. Algo's react accordingly.

      1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
        samanthacubbisonposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        Most articles going through the QAP process before being accepted by a Network Site are only on HubPages for a few days (at most). This doesn't destroy your SEO. SEO is "flexible," meaning you can always improve your ranking.

        Now, if it's been quite a while and your article is staying on HubPages, you can always remove it and put it on your own site! Once it is removed and you've gone through the process @RonElFran described, there shouldn't be any issues

        1. paradigmsearch profile image89
          paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

          First, thank you very much for your reply. Second, you are dead wrong.

          Transferring an article is murder; I am talking years of experience here.

          It does not have to do with just HP; do I really have to elaborate about the net?

          I guarantee HP will have an offline submission procedure within two years, probably one.

          1. paradigmsearch profile image89
            paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

            And while I'm at it, this thread just handed HP and Maven about 100K of what I would have charged clients in the old days. Feel free to contribute.

      2. TessSchlesinger profile image94
        TessSchlesingerposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        That's just not true. I've removed numerous articles from Wizzley, deleted them from the web, then posted them (slightly updated) on to hubpages where they have been selected for niche sites and have been doing well.

        So, just in case something has changed, and this is no longer possible, can you tell us where you got this from? Thanks.

      3. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        Algos are as the name suggests, algorighms and not databases. If the content is live they will see it, if there are copies they will see that there are copies. But if there are no copies and you delete your work and move it someplace else, they will not realize that it is the same piece of content that has been moved. It's expensive having databases of actual content, no one is going to bother with the upkeep of databases of deleted content. By no one I am referring to search engines.

        1. paradigmsearch profile image89
          paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

          https://archive.org/web/ is not the only one. Unfortunately, algos can use this data anyway they wish.

          1. lobobrandon profile image88
            lobobrandonposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

            I knew you would bring this up and that is why I clearly say: By no one, I am referring to search engines. Search engines have budgets and budget their crawl of websites that matter, they are not going to waste their time going through archive sites to find "copies".

    2. lobobrandon profile image88
      lobobrandonposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

      PD has the right idea. If published on HP, it's very likely going to be copied across the internet. While you file DMCAs there are chances of more copies to be made.

      You cannot get it deindexed through webmaster tools either Google or Bing because we do not own hubpages.com or any of the niche sites. You can wait for it to be taken off the index which is not an issue. The only real issue is if someone makes copies of the article in the time that you wait for a decision.

      1. RonElFran profile image96
        RonElFranposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

        It is incorrect to say you cannot deindex an article unless you own the site. I have deindexed quite a number of my articles on shared sites I don't own. The deindex tool does not assess ownership at all - it only checks to see whether the url is still active or not. So, once an article has been removed from the web, you can ask for it to be deindexed.

        As an aside, the fact that it only checks to see if the url is active can work against you. If the site redirects the url of your deleted article to another active url, Google may not allow you to deindex it because your url appears to still be active. Bing is smarter in this regard.

  3. paradigmsearch profile image89
    paradigmsearchposted 7 weeks ago

    Well, I've caught up on this thread. I see I went on quite the rampage. This topic had been on my mind for a long, long time. Good thing I was perceiving it as casual conversation, instead of an outright debate. Leastwise HP now knows why I don't publish anything new here. As for our respective theories, time will tell. big_smile

    Looking forward to a laid back Friday. And it so happens, a laid back 28th.

    And to throw in another thought, a reference to Vegas so to speak. "What happens on a niche site stays on a niche site." Writers should not have to live in constant fear of being thrown off on any given day.

    Meanwhile, my fondness of HP continues.

 
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