The Number of Forum Threads Around Here Is Becoming Considerably Less

Jump to Last Post 1-27 of 27 discussions (148 posts)
  1. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 2 months ago

    Is it a trend or is it being initiated by HP? Just curious.

    1. Solaras profile image95
      Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I think a lot of people who were once active in HP forums, are no longer active on this platform.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image88
        paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Yep, I do believe it has been happening for a long time now. However, I'm now beginning to think the deceleration is becoming even more so. Maybe we are gradually being herded to the Maven forum platform.

        1. PaulGoodman67 profile image96
          PaulGoodman67posted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, a lot of the forum stuff is repetitive when you have been here for years. When is pay day? How can I improve my hubber score? and the endless quotes all get pretty tedious, at least for me.

          The forums used to be super vibrant years back, although much of the advice from other hubbers could be pretty crappy and the arguments often rancorous. The truth is I suspect that the people doing well just get on with it and don't come to the forums that much. It's only when when there's a massive crash that they come out of the woodwork.

      2. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

        More and more I am saying less and less. Still active though.

        1. Sherry Hewins profile image94
          Sherry Hewinsposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Me too. It's like it's all been said already.

          1. Will Apse profile image91
            Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            When the problems have all been solved, it has all been said. We are nowhere near that.

            What I see is resignation and fatalism.

    2. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I've noticed that, too.  I thought maybe it was just the holidays and people are too busy right now to post.  I hope we don't lose the forums because I have found them to be very helpful over the years.

    3. promisem profile image98
      promisemposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      It's a little discouraging to help someone and not get a thank you or even any response in return.

      1. Will Apse profile image91
        Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        A proportion of the "help passing QAP" requests are just people going through the motions after a rejection. Writing a response when the person never comes back is an interest killer.

      2. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

        To me it is even worse when you spend the time reading and commenting on their article and they come back and argue with you. I rarely do this anymore. I do not know how Bev manages to continue to be so helpful to so many people.

        1. promisem profile image98
          promisemposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          LOL, yep, I know what you mean.

        2. lobobrandon profile image88
          lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          You stuck in there longer than I could and Bev amazes me, haha.

          1. theraggededge profile image96
            theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            It's just a routine, while I'm having my morning coffee. Some I want to help, others, not so much big_smile

            1. lobobrandon profile image88
              lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              Oh okay smile That makes sense lol.

        3. theraggededge profile image96
          theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          It's amusing when they argue. And rewarding when they work on their articles and get them approved.

          Some though... you know, women as chattels - ugh.

  2. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 2 months ago

    I am sure Hubbers go through the forum and look and read without posting.  My posts here are generating comments from those I have not seen on the forums. With that, I don't think to post on the forums influences impressions and CPMs.

  3. Will Apse profile image91
    Will Apseposted 2 months ago

    The switch to Maven had a big effect. For reasons I don't understand, people were suddenly much less forthright. There is no evidence of a great spider at the heart of that organisation, eager to gobble up anyone who complains too much.

    1. watergeek profile image96
      watergeekposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      What is it about Maven anyway? Are we supposed to be trying to write for them?

  4. psycheskinner profile image85
    psycheskinnerposted 2 months ago

    It's also a busy time of year for a lot of people.

  5. lobobrandon profile image88
    lobobrandonposted 2 months ago

    I personally don't really login in as much. I used to check in multiple times a day before, just been busy.

    1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Could you email me?  I have a few questions. Thanks.

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Done smile

    2. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      You are missed.

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        I miss it too smile

  6. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 2 months ago

    If there was a purpose or reason to visit and comment on the Forum, people would take the time.

  7. daydreams profile image96
    daydreamsposted 2 months ago

    I never posted that much anyway but these days when I check there is not usually anything interesting or new.

    1. watergeek profile image96
      watergeekposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I'll bet most of the new stuff is going onto Facebook . . . people thinking more about politics these days than writing.

  8. loukif profile image46
    loukifposted 2 months ago

    thank you for your kind time

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      You can actually here time in this forum. So we should all be grateful that it is kind.

    2. theraggededge profile image96
      theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Profile: "agence web fournissant de nombreux services, construction de site web, classement, design, marketing"

      Won't work here, buster.

    3. FatFreddysCat profile image96
      FatFreddysCatposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Obvious spammer is obvious.

      ...or should I say "spammer évident est évident"?

      1. Solaras profile image95
        Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        LOL - in the "mean" time I shall persevere.

  9. Doneta Wrate profile image89
    Doneta Wrateposted 2 months ago

    There are always new people coming on that need advise.  And some that have been here only a couple years still need advise,  Such people need the more experienced hubbers to hang around

    1. watergeek profile image96
      watergeekposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      That's something to think about. I haven't been on here looking to give advice, but maybe that's the conversation I'm missing on Facebook.

  10. Will Apse profile image91
    Will Apseposted 2 months ago

    https://hubstatic.com/14768275.jpg

    I suppose we should be grateful we are not polar bears.

    1. snakeslane profile image84
      snakeslaneposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      That comment made me smile, so true.

  11. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 2 months ago

    For me, Will's screenshot is the last piece of the puzzle.

    It is a fact HP has been making subtle, and not-so-subtle, inhibitory changes to the forums for awhile now. I've now come to the belief the objective is eventual elimination of the HP forums altogether. One of these mornings we are going to wake up to an announcement from HP of exactly that.

    Nothing sinister about it, just business.

    (This prediction made November 25, 2019, 7:00 pm PST.)

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      To be honest, I reckon it is the dwindling number of writers. Plus absurd anxiety about speaking up.

      If traffic surged, this place would be buzzin' (as old people think young people say).

      On the other hand, it is obvious that you, as an individual, care deeply about the forums, and I am sure others do, too.  So there is hope.

      Also, it would be very poor practice to have a crowd-sourced website without a forum.

      Worse still, I would have to join twitter or some such such nonsense if the rug was pulled.

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Twitter yikes I'd rather have us set up a hub where we can talk through the comments if that were to happen.

        1. paradigmsearch profile image88
          paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          I also have a second prediction. After all, if one accepts the premise of the forums being extinguished, then there must be a reason. I'll work up the energy to post the second prediction at a later time (am still in the process of waking up this Tuesday morning). It's what some would consider a barn burner, but in actuality is not a threat to our income.

        2. Will Apse profile image91
          Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Randy would love to host that... the lonely rebel on a hill with a tattered flag, a dwindling band of loyal allies and savage enemies lurking unseen in the surrounding mist.

  12. Solaras profile image95
    Solarasposted 2 months ago

    So scrolling down a few minutes ago brought me to an oldie but a goodie.  Will Apse yearning for the Bubblews threads to be elsewhere, and the ensuing comments about how good, and then how crappy that site was. I can hardly believe that 6 years have passed since that debacle.

    Interestingly, many folks were complaining about the lack of activity and interest in the Forums then.  Many of those have indeed moved on - Mark Ewbie most notably. I re-enjoyed Thomas Swan's interview with Arvind Dixit and fondly recalled Dr. Mark's old BB post - Everytime I Read Someone Praising Arvind It Makes Me Want to Puke. That was some easy money for a short while - then so much fury...good times.

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      The old forums were part of a genuine crowd sourcing operation. In other words, anyone could publish anything. Hence a lively and entertaining rabble in the forums.

      QAP and eds mean only pros and semi pros remain. As the lady with the violent name points out, that makes us rather dull.

      Sorry for 3 posts in a row.

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        The topical forums are anywhere from as dead as these. There's a lot of Trump stuff all the time.

        1. FatFreddysCat profile image96
          FatFreddysCatposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Back in the day the topical forums were all-Jesus, all the time. Now it's all-Trump, all the time. I'm not sure which is worse.

          1. lobobrandon profile image88
            lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            There's the occasional religious thread too. Not specifically Jesus.

            1. Solaras profile image95
              Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              Now that Trump has declared himself the chosen one, the threads are one in the same.

              1. lobobrandon profile image88
                lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                haha

  13. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 2 months ago

    Ok, here's my second prediction. It may seem like a big deal to some, but it really isn't.

    HubPages will discontinue publishing articles on the hubpages . com domain. It is a duplication of resources and Maven is big on getting rid of that sort of thing. Our Maven Channels (what we used to call "niche sites") will remain alive, well, and prosperous. It is only the hubpages . com domain platform that is going the way of the dodo bird.

    This is why Maven/HP is inducing a slow, natural death to the forums. This is actually nice of Maven and HP. They could have just announced an extermination of the forums at any time, but they apparently have decided to wait until the forums are already pretty much dead anyway before initiating that action.

    I'll probably get some flack for these predictions, but I've worked in a lot of corporate environments in my time. HubPages is part of a corporation now, so I think the inevitable will follow; especially since I'm seeing all the signs I've learned to recognize over the years regarding these kinds of situations.

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I don't see any evidence that Maven is interfering in these forums in a harmful way so please tell me what you are seeing.

      One thing I do see is Samantha working hard to improve the forums by trying to introduce new features. She has had a muted response. I have tried to be supportive, but "supportive" is not one of talents. Should probably give up, lol.

      Anyway, please tell us what makes you think the forums are under threat, besides the shortage of new threads.

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Yup, I've seen the opposite, she has been trying to revive it and you were the only one that replied to a thread at the time I saw it.

      2. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
        samanthacubbisonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        I promise that Maven isn't up to anything! We want to see the forums flourish. But aside from my announcements and whatnot, it's up to you guys to post and collaborate!

        1. watergeek profile image96
          watergeekposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Thanks for verifying that Samantha. I'm getting tired of going to FB all the time for social interaction. I've decided to hang out here for a little while other writers, so it's good to know the forums (fora?) will be continuing.

          1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
            samanthacubbisonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            @watergeek, of course! I hope we can find a way to liven things up a little. The topical forums are still going strong, so it seems to be the HubPages-specific forums that people seem to be worried about.

  14. psycheskinner profile image85
    psycheskinnerposted 2 months ago

    Maybe we are just boring.

  15. janshares profile image93
    jansharesposted 2 months ago

    I miss the old days, circa 2012. The forums were hopping. To be honest, I check in and out for stats and to see what's shaking in the forums. Usually not much anymore. hmm

  16. Solaras profile image95
    Solarasposted 2 months ago

    A quick search on the death of forums reveals that forums are dead. lol One reason given is over organization, stifling inter-discipline interaction.  What am I saying?

    I felt in the moment that MaM was stifling the forums back when Squidoo came on board.  She spanked those who went off topic, and I suspect she enlisted staff to spank us as well and keep us on topic. Ultimately that killed the fun and humor and made for deadly serious discussions led by resentful new comers. Too much goodie two shoes which led to Beth and PS being banned for long periods of time or eternity.

    Given that the Squidoo onboarding coincided with another algo hit, many joined in jumping off-board.  Writer Fox, Relache and Marissa had strong opinions, often in conflict, which drove discussions.  Now we are indeed boring.

    Thank God Sue Adams went viral and we can each share in a glimmer of hope for the future.

    1. lobobrandon profile image88
      lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Sue went viral recently? I was never a fan of MaM. All complains nothing more from what I recall.

  17. FatFreddysCat profile image96
    FatFreddysCatposted 2 months ago

    Occasionally such threads turn into unintentional comedy gold, though. So there's that.

    1. lobobrandon profile image88
      lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Haha.

  18. PaulGoodman67 profile image96
    PaulGoodman67posted 2 months ago

    Part of the appeal of the forums were the arguments, whining, boasting, good and bad advice, and people threatening to leave for good (they always came back at least once, some of them are still here, I believe!)...

    I think it's all got more serious nowadays, as you have to be fairly serious to jump through all the hoops to get onto the niches etc. The forums can seem almost frivolous in comparison.

    I also think that the internet generally has lost its "Wild West" feel over time. There was a period when it was dangerous and scammy, but there was also a feeling of "anything is possible". That's diminished and to some extent, HP reflects the wider changes.

    Of course, Maven is the big story now, I'm sure that there are big changes afoot - HP is maybe kind of old news in that sense... smile

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Read all about it! Read all about it!

      https://news.google.com/search?q=maven% … id=US%3Aen

      1. theraggededge profile image96
        theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Oh dear... I guess I can't rely on HP to be my extra pension when the time comes sad

        1. DrMark1961 profile image97
          DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Why? All I am reading is some New Yorker fake news opinion piece. They state "So why does Maven seem determined to kill it?" but give no evidence that Maven is trying to kill it. Make it more efficient, perhaps. Kill it, no. That just seems the ramblings of a journalist that thinks that no magazine should ever be reduced in size. EVER.
          I guess the New Yorker and their ilk just prefers the magazines go out of business.

      2. PaulGoodman67 profile image96
        PaulGoodman67posted 2 months agoin reply to this

        The way I perceive it, Sports Illustrated were in a bad situation, as their advertising revenue model was failing, as has been happening with many traditional publications. Maven acquired it on the cheap and are trying out a new ad revenue system, and using more freelance writers (like HP does). It either works out or it doesn't.

        As for HP being a pension. I am philosophical. If all this doesn't work out (and I hope it does, of course), I do feel I have at least learnt a bunch of skills for writing and earning in the modern world. smile

        I'm not a business expert. But I do think the internet world has changed considerably since the early days of start ups and small companies. HP had a uncertain future as a tiny fish in a big sea. With Maven, you've got a slightly bigger fish in a big sea! smile

        Whether it's realistic or "fatalistic" to go with the flow is obviously subjective. I seriously don't think objecting in the forums will have much impact at this stage, there's obviously a big plan afoot. HP was always promoted as a "community", a word that is so vague in its modern meaning, that hubbers tend to read into it what they want. Don't get me wrong, I like the forums, because you interact with other writers, and HP gets feedback, and sometimes you learn stuff, especially when you are starting out.

        Last year, I had my biggest incomes from HP Ads ever (though Amazon revenue continued its sad decline) so I'm prepared to give some slack and see what happens.  It may work out, it may be a disaster. We'll find out. But it's important to remember that there are risks in not changing, as Sports Illustrated and many other publications have found out.

  19. Will Apse profile image91
    Will Apseposted 2 months ago

    On the face of it, it is just another case of dumbing down. And someone filling their boots with treasure as a result.

    But writers often exaggerate when they see the axe approaching, lol.

    Anyone got to the bikini clad girls yet?

  20. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 2 months ago

    Samantha, Thank you for chiming in and setting things straight. We set the pace because forums are a community. Happy Thanksgiving!!

    1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
      samanthacubbisonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Of course! I'm always glad to see new threads popping up.

      Happy Thanksgiving!

      1. lobobrandon profile image88
        lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Aren't you guys off today? Happy Thanksgiving

        1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
          samanthacubbisonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          We are on whenever we want to be. smile Happy Thanksgiving!

          1. lobobrandon profile image88
            lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            That's even better wink

    2. watergeek profile image96
      watergeekposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      We need "like" buttons on here.

  21. Will Apse profile image91
    Will Apseposted 2 months ago

    I was reading an article yesterday suggesting that companies will only prosper going forward if they can demonstrate a sense of social responsibility and usefulness. Maven might find that hard.

    On the other hand, it has provided a safe harbor for us (so far). It also seems to have gotten the HP founders out of debt. No bad thing.

    I still can't work out what has spooked PDS. I reckon there is something specific that he just won't share.

    BBC article on the perils of capitalism run riot:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-50562518

    1. DrMark1961 profile image97
      DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Yeah, I read an article just like that back in the late 60s.
      Also, Maven should also fire anyone who is over 30 years old.Same philosophy.

      1. Will Apse profile image91
        Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        What exactly do you disapprove of in that article? Or the one you read 60 years ago?

        1. theraggededge profile image96
          theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Well, the BBC is not renowned for a balanced view these days smile

          Mind you, Simon Jack... well he quite liked capitalism once upon a time, probably before the Beeb indoctrinated him.

          "Before entering journalism, Jack worked for a decade as a corporate and investment banker in London, New York and Bermuda."

          1. Will Apse profile image91
            Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            Hmmm, you might like to read the article. No one is anti-capitalist. The Prof reckons business can be powerful tool that solves the worlds problems, the BBC reporter alludes to the realities of actually running a business, in a pretty sympathetic way.

            Anyway, I was simply trying to get Dr Mark to say something meaningful.

            He says everything that professional writers produce is fake news, you suggest the BBC is leftwing and therefore not worth reading.

            I am more in favour of seeing what the writers have to say, what evidence they present to support their contentions and what (if anything) can be learned.

            1. lobobrandon profile image88
              lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              This isn't something that is going to happen in the future, it's already happening. There are so many companies out there that are now trying to go "green". Many of them in manipulative ways just to make it seem like they are doing good things.

              Also, this isn't something new, but with the rise of social media, the extent of such boycotts is increasing. The Nestle boycott is quite famous for instance and it began in 1977 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestl%C3%A9_boycott

              People, especially the younger generation are more likely to buy a product from a company that also does its part in (for the sake of this example) maintaining the environment. This of course majorly plays a role only when two products are similarly priced. If there's a stark difference, some will still buy from the "better" company while others will go for the cheaper option and if something is not a necessity there are others who would have bought had the better company produced it, but would not bother if only the other one does or if the better company has an expensive product while the other sells it a lot cheaper.

              There are groups forming lists and working on stuff that lists companies that are ethical, etc. I have seen an increase in interest in such lists on Reddit over the past few months.

              I just did some Googling and I found these two websites that seem to offer something on these lines: https://www.ethicalconsumer.org/ and https://thegoodshoppingguide.com/ and there are apps that do a much better job at this. I forgot the name, but there's an app where you can scan an item's barcode and find out where it comes from, who worked to get it there and the kind of wages paid to the people who helped generate that product.

              This is not in line with the article you linked, but it is related to what your conclusion was: companies will only prosper if they work on their social responsibilities.

              1. DrMark1961 profile image97
                DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                I think your last line is not the real situation in most of the world. You might say "companies will only prosper among the green western Europeans if they work on their social responsibilities."
                The rest of the world is more concerned about price. The daily wage around here is about $12.50. When someone makes twelve dollars a day, and often less, do you really think they are worried about social responsibilities when they are shopping to feed their family?

                1. lobobrandon profile image88
                  lobobrandonposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  I spoke about that in my comment too. Not just western Europe, back in India too in the cities quite a few people watched what they bought.

                  1. DrMark1961 profile image97
                    DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    Yes, I thought your comment was good, as usual. It was the last line that I did not agree with.
                    India, like Brazil, has many economic levels so I do not mean to generalize. Down in the southern part of my country the people are wealthier and are able to care about things like social justice. In the northeast though things are tougher and price is what matters to most people.

              2. Will Apse profile image91
                Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                I reckon these things are important, but what most helps is legislation that makes it harder for unethical businesses to survive and easier for virtuous ones.

                Not that legislation always works out, lol.

                In the case of Maven, the first time it catches the national headlines, it is portrayed as dismembering the still living (ie still profitable) body of Sports Illustrated, for the sake of making a quick buck.

                In an alternate universe, Maven would have acquired Sports Illustrated, and kept it pure and profitable. Our alternate selves would have something to be proud of. Alternate Maven would have a flagship publication that insulated it against bad press and restrictive legislation.

                1. PaulGoodman67 profile image96
                  PaulGoodman67posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  I believe that in business you are considered to be doing well, if your revenue and profits are heading steadily upwards, even if you are deep in debt and (not yet) making a profit.

                  Sports Illustrated was the opposite situation. It had declining revenue and profits and was perceived by the business world as doomed, even though they were still just about staying in the black after a lot of cutbacks. The chances of that slim profit continuing seemed very low, as far as I'm aware.

                  The question of how the web-based economy works is difficult. I do for sure feel sympathy for the writers employed at SI who were working regular hours, receiving a decent regular wage, and receiving benefits such as healthcare insurance, pensions, etc. The replacement model seems to increase insecurity for writers in many cases. Some people do like the freedom of this type of model though. I like it myself in the case of HP. It would be nice to have more security and have benefits, but I wouldn't appreciate going to an office everyday with constant deadlines and doing a 40 hour week. I like working from wherever and whenever I want. All sorts of work fields are going the same way: Uber drivers, Air BnB, etc. I have a bunch of income streams, HP being one, but none offer the reliability of traditional full time job. I'm not sure what the solution is, people need some stability and security, but it seems the traditional way of doing things is moribund in many areas of life. Answers need to be found, but I am pretty sure that the answer is not to just go back to the old ways. The internet has transformed the game.

                  Below is a link to a positive take, Will, as you seem convinced that the news is entirely negative. (I can't vouch either way for the reliability of the source though - maybe it's too good to be true, though the New Yorker opinion piece seemed unreasonably negative in its tone).

                  Sports Illustrated and Maven Score Quickly

                  1. DrMark1961 profile image97
                    DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    Thanks for that link. Interesting article. I think that saying the other is "unreasonably negative" is right on the mark.

                  2. Will Apse profile image91
                    Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    I am glad someone decided to mount a defense of Maven which did not involve the "it is all fakenews" line.

                    Bear in mind though, that link is to a press release from Maven.

                    Way down the bottom:
                    "Contacts
                    Greg Witter, press@maven.io"

                    Also, as UK types we not able to judge the emotional impact of transforming SI into a fanzine.

                    The legit press seem to believe that SI is a national treasure.

                    I have nothing against outsourcing, per se, by the way. I have a friend who works for a US company that buys up recently outdated software and sells it at rock bottom prices into the countries like Poland, Malaysia and India. Apart from the owners, I don't think any of the staff are US based.

                    I can't see anything wrong with that. The software was first rate a couple of years ago and perfectly good now. Poorer countries get fully supported use at a good price.

                    My friend also earns 3000 dollars a month in Thailand, which is more than the local airline pilots are paid.

                    Generally speaking though, tech companies like Uber have a very hard time justifying themselves as socially useful. Which means at some point there will a reckoning.

                  3. Solaras profile image95
                    Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    Giganomics = a variety of gigs to make a living.  I like that concept too - and universal healthcare, instead of relying on employers to provide semi affordable healthcare, is the ultimate ticket.  Why should employers be burdened with finding a new insurance plan every year, because the introductory rate just went up 30% st the end of the year. Insurance has been playing that game since my first job in the 1980s.

                    So what does anyone think of Andrew Yang's $1000.00 a month scheme.  I am in; to smooth over the rough bits lol

              3. Solaras profile image95
                Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                Here in GA, Coca Cola is a king, and the world's largest producer of plastic bottles.  They give to Keep America beautiful environmental funds on the one hand, and use the removal of that funding, as an under the table cudgel, to suppress bottle laws.

                Bottle laws would require deposits be paid on the plastic containers, and refunds are given when the bottles are returned.  Bottle laws only exist in 11 states, because Coke and a few others stymie them.  They are very effective in lowering pollution and getting refreshment bottles returned, without being mixed in with detergent bottles, making them less expensive to recycle.

                So they are giving to environmental clean up groups, which falls into your manipulative category. It remains to be seen if they will take the financial hit required with bottle laws, as they have to collect and recycle those bottles, and they would be charged by the municipalities to recycle those products. To date they have kept these shenanigans under the table, to the detriment of all.

                1. DrMark1961 profile image97
                  DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  I can imagine that the folks at Coca-Cola and Nestlé are less than worried about these social justice campaigns.
                  Truth in Advertising:
                  "Coca-Cola: Polluting the World´s Oceans, Two Liters at a Time"
                  "Nestlé: Selling Sugar Water to Ignorant People and Celebrating the 42nd Anniversary of the Boycott"

            2. DrMark1961 profile image97
              DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

              It seems like you are making up facts here. I said "All I am reading is some New Yorker fake news opinion piece" and in m;your comment you said that I stated that all professional writers produce fake news.
              No, not all. The New Yorker, however, has mastered it.

    2. paradigmsearch profile image88
      paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      "I still can't work out what has spooked PDS. I reckon there is something specific that he just won't share."

      Nope, just the opposite. No single event caused either of my predictions, just a long list of things observed over time.

      Meanwhile, I have perpetrated a discrete Hubber Group at https://maven.io/mavens/_conversations . It's located under the Community  tab. The title and short comment indicate it's just for us Hubbers. I figure it might be useful for us someday.

      1. Will Apse profile image91
        Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        You are still being shy about  airing your concerns or reporting your observations.

        If people won't make some kind of statement it is very hard to allay concerns. Or move things on.

        1. Solaras profile image95
          Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Are you suggesting Maven should promote corporate responsibility, or just that capitalism at large offers hope for the future?

          I read the article, and it made me smile - UK is more capitalism centric than USA. LOL.  Only if you consider that CEO's figure as high up as shareholders, given that CEOs are also shareholders, incentivised by stock options and stock price benchmarks. They have to use a Dutch company to give an example of a responsible brand, that ultimately capitulated to an American hostile takeover, and fed the greedy shareholders their due.

          The author must not have heard about our pharma industry, which has raised the price of drugs like insulin 600%, with all patents expired and blah blah. Americans pay 2-100 times what our companies sell their drugs for in the rest of the world.  Tell me about predatory capitalism in the UK, where the government is taking care of such niceties as healthcare.

          The author would do better to explain how responsibility would benefit the shareholder, since they own all of the cards in the USA.  Nothing will be nationalized in this country, we are currently trying to privatise the Veterans Administration and prison systems, in spite of all evidence to the contrary; outcomes are worse when corporate profits eclipse healthcare and incarceration outcomes.

  22. paradigmsearch profile image88
    paradigmsearchposted 2 months ago

    The forums certainly have livened up around here since my original post. big_smile

    Now if Maven/HP could somehow get AdSense to grant an exemption (they've done it before) and allow ads here, that would tip the scales enough to cause me to withdraw my prediction.

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Stirring the somnolent masses ain't always easy. So well done for that, lol.

      My problem is that I reckon I only have a couple of million words left in me. Might need those for moaning about life, the universe and everything.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image88
        paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        "My problem is that I reckon I only have a couple of million words left in me. Might need those for moaning about life, the universe and everything."

        Been there. Done that. For me it's now about philosophy, curiosity, resignation, acceptance.

        1. Will Apse profile image91
          Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          I will take that as a healthy rebuke, lol.

          1. paradigmsearch profile image88
            paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            I didn't mean it to be! Kind of the opposite, more of a kindred spirit kind of thing. smile

            Meanwhile, am waiting for January to do my update frenzy; both HP and website. We are talking 100+ articles, going to be a very busy month for me.

            1. Will Apse profile image91
              Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              I am helping my wife set up a bricks and mortar business. Interesting times. A significant portion of my energy has returned.

              Also, big plus: many new things to moan about, lol.

              1. paradigmsearch profile image88
                paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                I hope your brick and mortar business isn't subjected to the same bureaucracy nightmares there as ours here.

                Speaking of moaning; I just discovered that one of my website articles is a misaligned, totally disastrous, absolute mess when displayed on mobile. No waiting until January for that one. Am cleaning up that fiasco as we speak. Jeez, I hope Google hasn't already permanently put that article on their S List.

                HEY, FOLKS. ALWAYS CHECK HOW YOUR ARTICLES LOOK ON MOBILE!!! Just thought I'd share that. smile

  23. Will Apse profile image91
    Will Apseposted 2 months ago

    Just going back a little: "Uber had 6,000 US sexual assault reports in two years"

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-50682175

    I knew that seriously under-regulated Uber was bad, but not that bad.

    Maybe rename the service to "Trawma".

    1. paradigmsearch profile image88
      paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I read the article. Half the time it was the passenger that was assaulted, half the time it was the driver that was assaulted. What a world.

    2. DrMark1961 profile image97
      DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Still with the BBC links to Uber? I thought you were bored of this coversation.
      Just for your edification, taking an Uber is like having a gun. If you take an Uber, and do not get sexually assaulted when waiting in a dark place for a bus, you do not report to the police that you were not sexually assaulted.
      If you have a gun, and your house does not get robbed because the neighborhood crack junkies know you have a gun, you do not report to the police that you were not robbed.
      Maybe you should think of a clever name to brand the BBC and CNN.

      1. Will Apse profile image91
        Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Are you saying that the BBC article is false or unfair or that the report from Uber is false or unfair?

        This is a direct link to the report published by Uber:

        https://www.uber-assets.com/image/uploa … cle_inline

        I read your comment several times but genuinely could not make sense of it. What have crack dealers got do with this issue?

        Edit (after some thought): It might be that you are saying that in crime-ridden countries, it is better to take a risk with an unvetted Uber driver than it is to trust public transport (if available) or walking home. That would at be a defensible position. But it opens up a thousand other questions.

        One thing for sure, Uber is not going to solve your social problems, Neither are guns.

        1. DrMark1961 profile image97
          DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

          https://hubstatic.com/14786083.jpg

          Yes, the media does skew things. Do I know that particular article is skewed. No. I just find it better to distrust all of them until I know otherwise.
          Uber is not a solution. It is a good alternative though.
          No, guns are not going to solve our problems. That is what you should be telling all of the police there in Thailand, since as we all know they do not carry guns and trust in the goodwill of their neighbors.

          1. Will Apse profile image91
            Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            I tend to quote the BBC because, as a UK broadcaster, it is bound by law to produce fair and balanced reporting (newspapers are merely expected to follow journalistic principles).

            Sky, ITV etc are also reliable for the same reason but the BBC, as a national institution, is in the full glare of public scrutiny all the time. If they get their facts wrong, the outrage is immediate and heads will roll.

            Another plus is that online BBC articles separate fact presentation from reporter commentary in a way that anyone can follow.

            Interestingly, many reckon they have gone too far in striving for balance.

            So, in the climate debate they are accused of giving too much time to climate skeptics who rarely have any solid evidence to back up their assertions.

            1. theraggededge profile image96
              theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              big_smile big_smile big_smile

              That's hilarious, Will. It's like you have made some accurate observations and then turned them inside out.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_the_BBC

              "Jeremy Paxman argues that the Corporation's correspondents "travel the globe to tell the audience of the dangers of climate change while leaving a vapour trail which will make the problem even worse".[212] Paxman further argues that the 'BBC's coverage of the issue abandoned the pretence of impartiality long ago'.[213]"

              1. Will Apse profile image91
                Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                My mother reads the Daily Mail. I have to ask if you do.

                1. theraggededge profile image96
                  theraggededgeposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  Does she, and do you?

                  I ain't your mother, boy big_smile

                  1. Will Apse profile image91
                    Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    So that is a yes?

            2. DrMark1961 profile image97
              DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

              Of course you also read "authentic" news from such straightforward sources like Mother Jones, MSNBC, and the Huffington Post, right? We all KNOW that news is not skewed.

              1. Will Apse profile image91
                Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                If you learn how to read mainstream news, you can pick up useful and reliable info, whatever kind of spin they put on it. Populist newspapers are harder and require more attention, you might have to read how a subject is treated by multiple outlets.

                The important thing is not to give up and assume everyone is lying. If a writer has been trained as professional journalist they will present evidence that can be checked.

                If that sounds like too much work, it is best not to worry about the news at all.

                1. DrMark1961 profile image97
                  DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  Why is it that you people refuse to read something that does not support your views yet want the rest of us to read your Huffington Post? I realize it would be a lot of work for you to get up off of your couch and find something to read besides the BBC, but you might realize that you have improved your mind.
                  If you are unwilling to learn, it is best that you stick to MSNBC and they can encourage whatever mistaken views you already have.

              2. Solaras profile image95
                Solarasposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                What are you recommending for fair and balanced news reading?

                1. promisem profile image98
                  promisemposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  Any media outlet that follows journalistic legal and ethical standards. That mostly means newspapers.

                  It definitely does not mean cable news.

                2. DrMark1961 profile image97
                  DrMark1961posted 2 months agoin reply to this

                  The best one I have found so far is Reuters. I may not like what they say (more often than not) but at least they are not providing fake news and doing those stunts like CNN.
                  This is the link I use for my Brazilian news. https://www.reuters.com/news/archive/br … ageSize=10 Our president is about as smart as Trump and every week comes out with something stupid. The national news does not carry it.

                  1. promisem profile image98
                    promisemposted 2 months agoin reply to this

                    You just made my point -- newspapers versus cable news including Fox, CNN and MSNBC.

                    Too many people don't understand the difference. Newspapers and cable news are apples and oranges.

  24. EricFarmer8x profile image97
    EricFarmer8xposted 2 months ago

    I am having personal issues related to not knowing what to write for HubPages right now. I mostly log in, check my daily views, skim the forums, and that is it. Fact is I got a few of my own writing projects going and I am heavily focused on that.

    But I do want to write a few more things for HubPages. I am grateful for the feedback I have received and the chance able to start my own online writing here. I still value what I wrote as a good portfolio.

  25. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 2 months ago

    This thread convoluted to hilarious nonsense. big_smile

    1. Will Apse profile image91
      Will Apseposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      The "fake news" thing is so important. It leads to so much division and despair. When people start believing that it is impossible to know what is true and what is not, our cultures are dissolving.

      The phrase was first used to describe news that was simply made up. The wild conspiracy theories promoted as news by sites like Infowars, things like "Sandy Hook was staged", "Hilary runs a pedophile ring out of  pizza restaurant" were fact-free but widely taken as gospel by readers.

      Unfortunately, malign populist politicos quickly moved to use the fake news label as a way of cutting supporters off from real news that cast said politicos in a poor light.

      So, instead of responding to real issues and addressing them, populist leaders can simply refuse to accept scrutiny.

      The deliberate undermining of our ability to understand the world and engage in fact-based debate is incredibly damaging not just to politics but to people's mental health.

    2. paradigmsearch profile image88
      paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      That's what my threads are for. big_smile

  26. FatFreddysCat profile image96
    FatFreddysCatposted 2 months ago

    The number of forum threads around here may be considerably less, but the number of short, pointless, gibberish "articles" emanating from the Indian sub-continent has definitely increased.

    Seriously, how the hell is the site being flooded with so much of this crap all of a sudden? Did someone leave a back door open?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image88
      paradigmsearchposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I'm still going with the rampant-referral-link-spreading theory. I'm guessing the Indian sub-continent is now at the internet usage stage we were 10 years ago.

  27. Kenna McHugh profile image91
    Kenna McHughposted 2 months ago

    FatFreddysCat, No. But the toilet overflowed.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://maven.io/company/pages/privacy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)