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For the teachers out there - how long does it take you to prepare and write a lesson plan?


All lessons require some preparation, but how much is too much? How much is too little? And how much is just right? Obviously there will be differences between subjects, if you work with or without a textbook, if you have a curriculum to follow, and prior experience teaching the same subject. I'm currently teaching adults, first time teaching an intermediate conversation course, without any textbook support, or prior resources to draw upon, and I'm finding I spend 2-4 hours in preparation for a 90 minute class. My students are happy, but I'm getting worn down. I'd love some tips!

 

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KrystalD profile image86

Best Answer KrystalD says

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5 years ago
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    Kymberly Fergusson (nifwlseirff) 5 years ago

    Thank you! I have found that a crystal clear focus for each lesson certainly helps with planning! And also trying not to pack the lesson full of information (especially as I mostly teach conversation classes at the moment).

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Stephanie Bradberry (StephanieBCrosby) says

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5 years ago
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    Kymberly Fergusson (nifwlseirff) 5 years ago

    An outline with jotted notes is best I think, especially when referring to it during classes (if you need to). Were you planning with a textbook or without?

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Rhys Baker (TFScientist) says

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5 years ago
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    Kymberly Fergusson (nifwlseirff) 5 years ago

    Thanks for the suggestions! As these are discussion classes, there are no previous lesson plans available (I think most conversation class teachers improvise on the fly). Online resources do help somewhat.

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Kymberly Fergusson (nifwlseirff) says

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5 years ago
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MickS says

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    Kymberly Fergusson (nifwlseirff) 5 years ago

    Holiday planning certainly works best when there is a textbook or a curriculum to follow! For conversation classes, it's slightly more difficult - as the students choose the focus of the course/lessons.

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simichacko says

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5 years ago
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    Kymberly Fergusson (nifwlseirff) 5 years ago

    Preparing far in advance certainly helps with making classes run smoothly. Have you ever had to change your lessons/curriculum half-way through, perhaps to cover an unexpected gap in knowledge?

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Robin Bull (RobinBull) says

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4 years ago
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