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Math Hurts

  1. Brooke18 profile image81
    Brooke18posted 3 years ago

    Apparently an experiment was done where people were given math problems to do and were passed through a machine that analyzed which part of the brain doing math affects. The results: the same part that controls your pain receptors. The conclusion: math is supposed to hurt.

    This information is courtesy of my Calculus professor and the unknown psychologist conducting the experiment.

    Does this surprise you?

  2. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago

    Not quite right.  Anticipation of maths hurts if you are mathphobic, actually doing maths does not.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news … ce-health/

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image88
    Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago

    ...what hurts is doing something when you don't know why you are doing it (usually forced to learn it) and it is not for a purpose you can apply it to.

    1. Brooke18 profile image81
      Brooke18posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Exactly! Most of the stuff we learn in high school and college we won't use in real life. They claim we need to know it regardless, but I think school wouldn't have much to teach us if they only stuck to the things we will need. Then again, this is coming from a college student so I am biased.

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        That assumes we will all need the same stuff.  I use advanced statistics daily and calculus on a regular basis.  I would have been very disadvantaged if I never learned anything about it in high school or as an undergraduate. In fact I probably wouldn't have this job.

        1. Kathryn L Hill profile image88
          Kathryn L Hillposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          no pain no gain…?
          There are ways to teach math which incorporate its need and application.
               Those who understand math usually don't teach it very well… why?
          Perhaps, because they learned the concrete aspects a long time ago. They have put aside the concrete foundation and only teach the abstract steps.
               A good math teacher introduces the concrete before the abstract.
          For instance, Algebra is based on the number line. Many teachers don't use it to illustrate.

          1. Brooke18 profile image81
            Brooke18posted 3 years ago in reply to this

            A real problem occurs when some teachers don't explain the material well or teachers' ways of going about a problem are slightly different. For me, that causes major problems. In my Pre-Calculus class (which I just finished), the teacher reviewed Algebra and trigonometry. That's when I realized just how confused I had become over the years.

            I prefer to learn instead of re-learn.

  4. Jodah profile image86
    Jodahposted 3 years ago

    Math has changed so much since I went to school,but that aside I do find it painful to do anything other than addition, subtraction and multiplication. Geometry even gives me a migraine let alone calculus. smile

    1. Brooke18 profile image81
      Brooke18posted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Yep! I used to love math, but now it's just confusing.

    2. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Actually, math has seen very little change since Newton invented calculus.

      1. Brooke18 profile image81
        Brooke18posted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Well then I have Newton to thank for my class! Calculus is horrible.

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Horrible, yes - out of 50 students, only 4 made it through in my class.  But a very useful tool nonetheless.

          1. Brooke18 profile image81
            Brooke18posted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Wow. It's a requirement for me, as is physics. No one told me Calculus was necessary for Physics so I am now taking both Calculus and Physics at the same time.

            1. wilderness profile image96
              wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

              LOL  As a chemistry major I took chemistry, physics, calculus and, because I didn't know it was a pre-requisite for calc, trigonometry all at the same time.  An interesting year for sure!  On the plus side the calc was really a year early and that came in very handy in future physics/chemistry classes.

      2. Jodah profile image86
        Jodahposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        Wilderness, it isn't the actual math that has changed but the way the working out and setting out of the process to obtain the answers has changed. At least with my grand kids.

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          No it hasn't; it's the same algebra we used.  It hasn't changed.

          What HAS changed is the method of teaching.  It seems that more and more it is by rote memorization instead of actually understanding what is going on and why.  My kids, for instance, learned none of the theorems we not only learned but had to prove were always true.  They simply learned what is supposed to happen when you do THIS to numbers.  As a result they never truly learn math; just how to (sometimes) manipulate numbers if they fit the exact problem they memorized.

          1. Jodah profile image86
            Jodahposted 3 years ago in reply to this

            Exactly.

  5. wrenchBiscuit profile image89
    wrenchBiscuitposted 3 years ago

    This is an interesting fact that I was not aware of. If this is true, then it follows that the emotion of love must be centered at the same location to an even greater degree, since Americans seem to find loving each other, or Palestinians, to be even more painful.

 
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