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What is that enormous blue star in the sky at night?

  1. Brooke Ashley profile image58
    Brooke Ashleyposted 6 years ago

    What is that enormous blue star in the sky at night?

    I've noticed there is always a huge blue star in the sky at night. It always fascinated me because it is so round and big, and BRIGHT.

  2. Ellen Page profile image58
    Ellen Pageposted 6 years ago

    Well because you didn't specify where you are looking from and in what direction, this will only be a guess, but Rigel is a bright blue star that is visible to the naked eye. It is found in the constellation Orion (the most easily recognizable constellation) underneath what would be Orion's 3-star belt
    Hope this is the one you are thinking of!

  3. Brooke Ashley profile image58
    Brooke Ashleyposted 6 years ago

    This is not the one. I am familiar with the orion belt and it is not close to it. Thank you for your answer though. I'm sorry I can't give more detail.

  4. lone77star profile image83
    lone77starposted 5 years ago

    This is a puzzle. Stars in the night sky are always pinpoints, so none of them are "enormous," "huge" or "big" in visual size. The brightest bluish stars by "apparent" or "visual" magnitude are Sirius, Vega, Rigel, Alpha Eridani, Beta Centuari. The last two are too far south to be seen from most places in the United States. Then there's Altair and Spica. None of these could be considered "huge" or "big."

    The only round object in the night sky visible without a telescope is the Moon, unless you looking with spiritual "eyes." Then, it could be any star in the universe.

    If you gave some indication as to direction and time, that would help. For instance, just after sunset, low in the eastern sky during April. Your location would also help (especially latitude). Without these kinds of specifics, then there is little anyone can do to help.

 
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