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What are the differences between a drought and the conditions that led to the Du

  1. davenmidtown profile image87
    davenmidtownposted 5 years ago

    What are the differences between a drought and the conditions that led to the Dust Bowl?

    I am interested in answers that include the economic differences, the physical differences, and the differences that occur on a social basis. The weather channel listed July 2012 as the hottest month since the July 1928 which was the start of the Dust Bowl.

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought coupled with decades of extensive farming without crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops or other techniques to prevent wind erosion.[1] Deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains had displaced the natural deep-rooted grasses that normally kept the soil in place and trapped moisture even during periods of drought and high winds.

    1. davenmidtown profile image87
      davenmidtownposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      how is this different from the farming practices that are in place today in the US Midwest/Canada? I know that there is some erosion of top soil from water run off down the Mississippi have farming practices changed enough to prevent a 2nd Dust Bowl?

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes with technology, I do believe so.

  3. tom hellert profile image60
    tom hellertposted 5 years ago

    Dave , in answer to your second question- Since JT did such a good job... It should happen again because of the practices farmers now employ- People may pick on farmers as uneducated but i find farmers are some of the smartest people. The new farming practices and the new farming techniques help minimize the possibility for a dust Bowl 2. The Mississippi  basin is so big n strong and widespread there is no real way to stop the erosion of its banks.  its the overland erosion tht could et tough but keeping plants on fallow fields and crop rotation are key to keeping the soil around "better"...

    1. davenmidtown profile image87
      davenmidtownposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      do you mean it should or should not happen... how would natural disasters play into this... fire, extreme drought, etc.

 
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