Please elaborate on the gravity aspect of your rope hypothesis

  1. profile image50
    getonmyhorseposted 5 years ago

    Please elaborate on the gravity aspect of your rope hypothesis

    Hi Bill,

    I'm not a scientist, just lay person who is very interested in science. I find your rope hypothesis fascinating. It makes so much more sense than the very dubious wave model of conventional science, which I have never been comfortable with.
    I'm struggling a little with the gravity aspect of your model - what is it about the fanning out of the ropes that makes the attraction stronger? The number of ropes is equal in both cases, so I assume it must be a change in some property of the ropes that causes this?
    Please elaborate.

    P.S. your youtube videos are great, keep it up!

  2. billgaede profile image76
    billgaedeposted 5 years ago

    "what is it about the fanning out of the ropes that makes the attraction stronger?"
    .
    When the ropes are superimposed, they pull as one. Each atom is behind the other in a row. When they fan sideways, they each pull individually.
    .
    Example...
    .
    Let us assume you pull a string outwards with your hands. You ask someone to simply hold the center. You don't feel his pull. You only feel the tension between your hands because his interference is cosmetic.
    .
    Now ask him to pull side ways. Suddenly, you feel not only the tug of your hands but his pull.
    .
    Here is a simulation of what I'm proposing...
    .
    http://billgaede.hubpages.com/hub/Einsteins-Idiots-12
    .
    (Figs 5 and 6)

  3. A Troubled Man profile image59
    A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago

    Bill, you said here...

    "When the ropes are superimposed, they pull as one. Each atom is behind the other in a row. When they fan sideways, they each pull individually."

    You said this on another thread...

    "Gravity works like this. When two objects are far away from each other, the ropes superimpose and act as one (Fig. 8). However, as they get closer to each other, the ropes fan out, each atom now feels a greater tug from more atoms of the other object, and the two objects accelerate towards each other at an ever faster rate. Consistent with Newton’s gravitational equation, this phenomenon is a function of distance and the number of atoms comprising each object (i.e., ‘mass’). "


    Which is it, Bill?

 
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