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Is it true that after the graduation of studying literature , it is hard to fin

  1. ceyda profile image67
    ceydaposted 5 years ago

    Is it true that  after the graduation of studying literature , it is hard to find the job ?

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  2. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
    TIMETRAVELER2posted 5 years ago

    That would depend on the actual degree.  You might be able to find a job at the college level if you have an MA but literature itself as a major is not too marketable.  You should try to combine that degree with another for, say, secondary teaching.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ı will take into consideration to do it .thanks . after getting to approach the time when ı  will graduate,ı am getting  my full of  doubs about havıng job  smile

  3. SpiritLeo profile image69
    SpiritLeoposted 5 years ago

    I think, it's not easy. But don't give up! There is always a solution!

  4. Life and Luxury profile image84
    Life and Luxuryposted 5 years ago

    Not true. I became an editor after graduation with a good salary. English majors are usually editors, teachers, or technical writers, and these folks are always needed. There might be too many graduates to fill the positions, but this is true of most vocations.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ıt ıs really great job making a editor . ı was just thınkıng that maybe ıt can be also some differences between countries in terms of the demands of the job .

  5. StephanieBCrosby profile image85
    StephanieBCrosbyposted 5 years ago

    My response is along the same lines as Life and Luxury's answer. The short answer is "no."

    I majored in English and earned my teaching certification at the same time. I was offered and accepted a high school teaching position before I graduated. After three years and no tenure offer, I was able to easily transition to being an instructor at the college level (I had earned my M.A. in English while teaching high school). And that is what I have been doing ever since. But I have also added on tutoring, consulting, and so on (a whole business matter of fact--Crosby Educational Consulting).

    There is a misconception that humanities degrees and/or liberal arts degrees are becoming too useless. Many people base this on not getting a high paying job out of college. But as a note from all my lawyer and doctor friends, they end up making the same amount as me basically because their debt is so high. Plus, I can market myself for almost any field as a writer, editor, and so on. Every business and job requires some form of writing and editing, and often those with technical skills do not care to do it. So we step in. 

    Now it is true that if you are trying to get a Literature position as a professor that the odds are slim. But you can always get your foot in the door by being an adjunct English professor. Or, you can try to work for a publishing house or something along those lines.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ı felt really relax after reading it. when ı read some articles, ı am really stressed when ı saw "restricted job"ıncluding literature or when sb asks me why did you choose literature?ı choose  it with my all heart  and shape my life wıth ıt.thanks smile

    2. Life and Luxury profile image84
      Life and Luxuryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Amen!

  6. Rhonda_M profile image85
    Rhonda_Mposted 5 years ago

    If you are enterprising and flexible you can find a job by promoting writing skills or teaching skills. It doesn't hurt to get a graduate degree (the minimum credential for teaching in a college), and some training in community college or con ed courses in website writing, copy writing or journalism. If you want to teach literature, get a Phd, and you will be eligible to teach in a university.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      the system basically works with the grammer rule of englısh in terms of writing skill. ıt ıs good to hear that we have so many options to select and give a direction to our life way.

  7. c-m-hall profile image74
    c-m-hallposted 5 years ago

    Not if you're savvy. Just having graduated you can get any job that has at least something to do with where your interest lies ... have to start somewhere. Anywhere!  Just go for it and do your very best no matter what it is and before you know it you will climb! Have ENERGY! Good luck!

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you so much.. after reading all of your comments ı really took inspiration which ı understood that nothing is impossible if we try to do our best..

  8. profile image0
    Old Empresarioposted 5 years ago

    No; your major usually doesn't matter with a BA. Most bozos who say otherwise don't know what they're talking about. The American idea that college degrees are like trade certifications is dead wrong. I know people with law degrees who are waiting tables for a living. There's actually no such thing as a degree in literature anyway. The degree is called a BA and that's what you put on your resume. I became a director of sales with a BA (majored in history). My degree never held me back. As long as I had a degree, no one cared what it was in.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      as you said ,every year the need of the job differs from branches to the another one. ıt ıs also related to the development of the ındıvıdual hımself too.

  9. nisargmehta profile image83
    nisargmehtaposted 5 years ago

    I agree, as Language, which we consider to be most crucial aspect for any person, is over looked when it comes to professionalizing it. Technology and Commerce are considered most important segments when considering for graduation, which are of no use if there is no proper Language and its application. Companies who overlook are more vulnerable than any other as without language employees cannot connect with one another and so can't the company as a whole connect to their consumers / clients / customers. Awfully it's the fact anyways.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ,there can be so skillful workers in technology and commerce who are not  enough sufficiant to be good at in english,on the other hand  some people can be professional at english but insufficiant at them.Master degree in another branch sounds logical

  10. Missing Link profile image80
    Missing Linkposted 5 years ago

    The first year out of college tends to be rough and an ass kicker in general. If you persist and work hard something will come along.  What comes along may not have to do directly with your past studies but past studies, and the college experience  in general, will be quite an attribute.  If you hang in there, persist and can deal with suffering, in time, things will come your way.  Your question really isn't phrased in a way indicative of a literature major (no offense) but perhaps you are just relaxing per being in the Hubpages community....like many of us do.  Because you are concerned I believe you will do well.  I have a feeling and believe things will go well for you.  Don't forget, suffering often comes first before you get what you want.

    1. ceyda profile image67
      ceydaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's right .because as a literature student ,ı wanted to give our voice as all students ,even ın our daily conversation  we are thinking what we will do after graduatıon and many different ideas to give a shape our future. Thank s a lot .

 
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