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What factors cause J.D.s to fail the bar exam? (Not counting the fact that "it's

  1. Laura Schneider profile image92
    Laura Schneiderposted 4 years ago

    What factors cause J.D.s to fail the bar exam? (Not counting the fact that "it's hard".)

    Why is there such a high initial failure rate on the (lawyers' legal) bar exams in most states of the USA? What can a person do to increase their chances of passing on the first try?

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  2. cfin profile image82
    cfinposted 4 years ago

    I was going to take the bar in Wisconsin and I decided against it. Not sure if I want to pursue a career as an Attorney when the market is saturated as is. I think that many of the exams in US law schools are multiple choice. When it comes time to take the bar, many students are not used to the format.

    1. Laura Schneider profile image92
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting!! Would more training materials in taking this kind of multiple choice test help, do you think?

    2. cfin profile image82
      cfinposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Barbri or similar are very expensive. I studied in a separate common law district and would be well prepared for the essay section. Training materials aren't enough for others I know. It takes years to get good at exam essays.

  3. The Examiner-1 profile image74
    The Examiner-1posted 4 years ago

    Perhaps because they do not want to take it, or feel that they need to take it - whether it is consciously or subconsciously.

    1. Laura Schneider profile image92
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I'm confused. I thought that in order to practice law in the USA a person was required to pass the bar exam before they could be sworn in as a lawyer. A J. D. would have such high student loans they pretty much have to be a lawyer to pay them.  No?

    2. cfin profile image82
      cfinposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Unless you are in a diploma privilege state smile

    3. The Examiner-1 profile image74
      The Examiner-1posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Laura,
      In simple words, '"they back out". Because they are afraid to take it or they feel that they have enough knowledge that they do not need to take it.

    4. Laura Schneider profile image92
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      cfin, I learn something new every day: thank you! I did not know about "diploma privilege" states. Interesting! (MN, where I am, is not one.)

      Examiner: Fear of tests and hubris makes perfect sense, especially if the test is optional! Thanks!

 
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