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Do we all experiences senses the same way?

  1. Kathleen Odenthal profile image92
    Kathleen Odenthalposted 3 years ago

    Do we all experiences senses the same way?

    There has been large discussion about whether we all see the same thing. Is what I see as blue the same as what you see as blue? But what about the other senses? Do we all hear the same? If so why do we all tend to like different types of music? Tastes? How about emotions?

  2. profile image0
    sheilamyersposted 3 years ago

    Common sense is enough to answer "no" because some people have disabilities or one sense or another is diminished in some way. My dad has never been able to smell, but I have an overly acute sense of smell. My nephew is blue/green color blind and I'm not so we see colors differently.

    Yet set aside disabilities (a complete lack of a sense) or those with acute senses and the answer, in my opinion, still remains "no". For whatever biological reason, most people see, hear, taste, feel, and smell at least a little differently than other people. Because of that, our preferences for different scents, flavors, textures, etc will be at least slightly different from the people around us.

  3. jlpark profile image88
    jlparkposted 3 years ago

    Nope.
    Some people are lacking in one sense and make up for this in others.
    Others may have sensory intergration issues where they have all five senses but they don't always process them as someone without SI issues would.
    There are also people who have one sense experienced as another - such as hearing colour or feelings have a colour/tone/sensation not normally associated with that particular sense.

    The other thing is - what you see and what I see may be interpreted as completely different things based on the angle, the associations we place on the thing we see and our cultural differences.

    I distinctly remember the moment that I realised that what I saw was not necessarily what the person I was pointing it out to saw. Was weird and incredibly enlightening. I was about 11. It just suddenly occurred to me.

  4. fpherj48 profile image78
    fpherj48posted 3 years ago

    Kathleen.....As I read your question, I immediately thought, "hmmm, it seems fairly obvious to me that each of us translate uniquely through our senses."  I was already recalling incidents where this has been proven in many situations.
    For instance, If 3 or more people are eating the same food, it's happened where all 3 claim tasting a different flavor from one another.  Perhaps there are a multitude of reasons for this, but I'll bet this has happened to you too at least once.
    Since our "senses"..as well as our entire existence operate via THE CENTRAL MOST INTEGRAL part of the human....our Brain, this can easily be explained and understood, I would guess.
    We surely all SEE in most varied and unusual ways in terms of differing from the next guy.  If this was not the case, in sharing descriptions, we would all be identical in every aspect.  I doubt this has ever occurred..
    If we think about "hearing"....hundreds of scenarios come to mind.  Tone, decibels of sound, pitch...how can we explain the phrase...."having an "ear" for music?"  Ever sit next to a tone deaf person happily singing away at a song...totally off key....believing they sound like Celine Dion?  EEEEK!  Brings the shivers down our back just thinking about it.  LOL.
    Yes, Kathleen we surely are all very different from one another and IMO it stands to reason that this can be observed quite well via what our individual senses tell us.
    Not included in the known FIVE senses.....I'd like to mention "common sense!"  LOL.....Now there's something where we all have completely different levels, from "total to none at all!"  LOL  (I had to throw that in there, Kathleen....forgive me).............
    This is another one of those "Thinking" kinds of questions that can end up in long long discussions amongst a group.  My favorite.

 
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