What is the difference from GMO in a lab and GMO Naturally?

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  1. Lady Guinevere profile image61
    Lady Guinevereposted 3 years ago

    What is the difference from GMO in a lab and GMO Naturally?

    In a lab it can happen faster.  In nature it happens slowly.  Not all GMO's are bad fro us. Thing good things of BMO are the ones they make such as a longer growing season or grown in a hattoer climate or cooler clomate.  It can also be done for insect relling of certain plants that were weaker in that.  There are a variety of ways that GMO's are done in the lab and in nature.

  2. ChristinS profile image95
    ChristinSposted 3 years ago

    Hybridization that occurs naturally is not the same as GMO, I would do some research on the differences.  GMO's are specifically engineered to be able to be sprayed with huge amounts of pesticides.  These pesticides infiltrate the plants without killing them, yet kill all manners of insects.  Bee colony collapses and even the rapid decline of the monarch butterfly are due to the overuse of pesticides.  GMO is banned in multiple countries for a reason.  These poisons kill everything but the plants, and we are eating them in the vast majority of our foods.  Look how unhealthy Americans are by and large and how many chronic diseases are on the rise since the mass infiltration of GMO's in about the mid-90's or so.  Not as safe as marketing people want us to believe.

    1. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Bee colony collapse was and is not from pesticides.  It is a fungus to only that species of bee.  Too many Anit-bacteria meds is the cause for Americans getting sicker.  I know about the bans. Many things that were GMO did not make it to mass product

    2. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      There are Harvard studies that have linked the neonicotinoids in pesticides to colony collapse.  The pesticides we use in mass quantities are killing wildlife and probably us too. We'll just have to agree to disagree on GMO's smile

    3. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Who is paying for those studies and what is their agenda?  We have been using pesticides for a very long time, since at least the 1940's.  Solitary bees do a much better polinating plants than Honey Bees.  We exploited the Honey Bees.

    4. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      If it's an agenda you're looking for I'd look at Monsanto

    5. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You are only thinking about the one thing and not the whole. There are GOOD things that have been modified.  See those.

    6. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I'm more concerned about profits over people, lack of safety checks etc. Fire does good for some people too, not so much when it burns down your house though.. GMO foods are going too far

    7. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      That was not the purpose of this question.  Grafting of Apples to get more kinds of apples is also GMO.  Thornless Blackberries is alo GMO.

  3. lisavollrath profile image96
    lisavollrathposted 3 years ago

    Hybridization occurs in nature, and can be encouraged by gardeners or breeders, to naturally select for certain traits. Two tomatoes might be cross-bred to select for heat tolerance, for example. This is a process that might occur naturally, and is simply encouraged by breeders. It results in a tomato that is still completely a genetic tomato.

    Genetic modification occurs in a lab, and generally involves injecting the DNA from one species into another. For example, sweet corn has been injected with the Bt toxin gene, to discourage corn borers. The result of genetic modification in this case is a species that is part corn, and part pesticide. These modifications cannot occur in nature. They are not regulated, or independently tested. They're also patented, and controlled by the manufacturers, who prohibit the collection of seed from the current year's crops. This requires growers to purchase new seeds every year, and gives the manufacturers control of the food supply.

    Who manufactures genetically modified seed? Pesticide manufacturers. They're not interested in creating more food, better food, or more nutritious food. They're interested in selling more pesticides.

    1. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Absolutely correct - great explanation.

    2. bravewarrior profile image91
      bravewarriorposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Right on. Nature does not genetically modify foods. Scientists do and it's killing us, the environment, and many wildlife species.

    3. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      organism whose gene has been engineered in the lab in order to favor the expression of desired physiological traits or the production of desired biological products.http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/897705/genetically-modified-organism-GMO

    4. ChristinS profile image95
      ChristinSposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      LG watch this with an open mind https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6OxbpLwEjQ it's a full documentary with many experts. They don't fight labeling GMO's or ban them in other countries for no good reason.

    5. Keisha Hunter profile image79
      Keisha Hunterposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      lisavollrath you should write a hub on that if you haven't already. Great info, thanks for sharing.

    6. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I watched it.  Monsanto is not the only one of the block!  Breeding dogs and cats for specific traits IS GMO too as well as some fruits that we eat and so on and so forth.  There are always another side to things.

    7. lisavollrath profile image96
      lisavollrathposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      NO. Breeding does NOT result in genetic modification. GM refers to the altering of the DNA in a lab, by the splicing of genes from one breed into another. A GMO cat is one that glows in the dark, from having jellyfish genes spliced into its DNA.

  4. Lady Guinevere profile image61
    Lady Guinevereposted 3 years ago

    When I asked this question I thought that I was going to get some intelligent answers and not the most likely in your face propaganda.  I have found that there are GMO's that do occur with human help that is NOT all bad.  I was trying to get answers that made you think about the world and the food and things in medical research.  I did not get that here, so I am not selecting anyting as a best answer yet.  As I read some other hubs around here I did come across on that show that the Stem Cell Therapy utilizes GMO of the human kind in it's research and development.  You can read about it on this hub:  http://diogenes.hubpages.com/hub/An-Int … -Treatment

 
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