How come it takes an airplane flying at 500 mph 3 1/2 hours to fly from Nashvill

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  1. somethgblue profile image81
    somethgblueposted 5 years ago

    How come it takes an airplane flying at 500 mph 3 1/2 hours to fly from Nashville to Denver?

    After all, NASA tells us the Earth spins at 1,035 miles an hour from West to East and the distance from Nashville to Denver is 1,159 miles. So if an airplane is flying at any speed not just  500 mph, shouldn't it just have to fly for about an hour allow the Earth to spin towards it and land, it doesn't make sense.

    Now, consider this flying from West to East even at 500 mph would actually put you in Arizona not Kansas because the Earth has travelled a thousand miles while you have only travelled 500, you'd be going backwards?!

    Someone please explain this to me, thank you.

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12626785_f260.jpg

  2. fpherj48 profile image59
    fpherj48posted 5 years ago

    I can make my best attempt, but I have no idea how Kansas got into this mix....while I only THINK I know why you brought up Arizona.  (?)

    The time span issue has to do with "winds," I believe.  The speed of those winds is relative to the earth's spinning. I cannot explain this as an aerospace engineer.....but flying FROM the west (Westerlie winds) the plane speeds up.  Traveling TO the west, contrarily it slows down.

    Actually I think it's your "wording" blue darling, that confused me. This may not even be the answer you're looking for. Or I haven't explained myself well enough.

    Is this one of your TRICK questions with a conspiracy involved??
    OK...go ahead, expose my stupidity.  Make your day.   
    In any event, looks like no one else has braved an answer.

    1. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I give........too tired to tax my poor over-worked, under-appreciated brain.  This was my best shot, blue.....smile

    2. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I don't know why, I mean if the Earth is traveling 1,000 mph and you are going 500 mph in the same direction wouldn't you be losing ground?

    3. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      only if it's going in the SAME direction......but coming toward you, if your speed in adjusted, you wouldn't lose ground.   If your running in a race and someone is running twice as fast as you (with nothing to propel you forward......you lose.......

    4. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is what I said, if you travel in the same direction the Earth is spinning W. to E. from Denver & you're going 500 mph and the Earth is going 1000 mph, you end up in Nevada or Az. not Kansas?

    5. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Nashville is in Tennessee, as far as I know, blue.....and Denver is in Colorado..........So AGAIN,,,, where does your statement, "You end up in Nevada or AZ not Kansas,"   fit in?  You're making me dizzy!  Somehow UR leaving something OUT.

    6. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The Earth is spinning towards Nashville at 1,000 mph you are in a plane going 500 mph from Denver, in one hour the Earth has spun 1,000 miles to gain any ground you have to be moving faster than the Earth is spinning or you are losing ground, hello?

    7. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I never COPY answers.  That's cheating.  I will take my failing grade like a woman.

  3. Doc Snow profile image94
    Doc Snowposted 5 years ago

    The atmosphere rotates, too, not just the Earth.  Obviously, or we'd be continually buffeted by 1,000 mph winds.

    And, by the way, it doesn't take 3 1/2 hours to fly from Nashville to Denver, either:

    http://www.travelmath.com/flying-time/f … hville,+TN

    1. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      so Doc...quick! before blue stops by...was my answer right?  U said it so simply. 
      Women always complicate things.

    2. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      My bad, I meant to say two hours and 30 minutes but the question remains the same and so far has not been answered. Yes, the atmosphere rotates also however why not fly straight up and wait for the Earth to rotate to you? C'mon guys, I'm waiting . .

    3. Doc Snow profile image94
      Doc Snowposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      blue, have you ever tried flying a plane *out of the atmosphere?*

      Me, either, but from everything I read it wouldn't work very well.

    4. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      . . . and your point is? The question needs to be answered regardless of your attempts at being clever, we both know they are merely distraction techniques most commonly used by paid trolls and schills . . . which one are you?

    5. Doc Snow profile image94
      Doc Snowposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I did answer your question:  The rotating atmosphere carries the airplane with it, so the Earth will never 'rotate to you.'

  4. Ruth Angel profile image79
    Ruth Angelposted 5 years ago

    Well....the New Horizons probe was traveling at more than 35,000 mph, but it still took 9 years for it to reach Pluto.

    In order to really understand such an inquiry, you'd have to apply the proper mathematics.

    1. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Ruth Angel... It also requires more info & explanation than dear blue is offering.  It's OK.  He just wants to display his superior intellect!  LOL

    2. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I ain't stopping you, feel free, although I must say so far all I've heard is excuses and no explanations. However what Pluto and the New Horizons probe has to do with my question, even stretches my imagination beyond its limits.

    3. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      blue......never.  Your imagination has no limits.  This is no time to be modest.  A brain like yours just keeps on going.  Further & further......

    4. Ruth Angel profile image79
      Ruth Angelposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      My comment was intended to imply that without the proper mathematical process, we couldn't possibly give you an adequate enough answer to that question. So true, my comment had no relevance to the question.

    5. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The answer does not require any mathematics what-so-ever, that is distraction technique, pure and simple. This is a question of your (world view) or perception. If you do not feel you can trust your own perceptions, then you are not qualified . . .?

    6. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Blue...I was just beginning to have fun and I'm disqualified. I confess, I don't have the answer.  Sorry.  I really thought I did. Where R all the HP geniuses?  Surely we have one who can answer this!

    7. somethgblue profile image81
      somethgblueposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Boo-hoo, I sent you the answer in my email and even provided a video in case conjuring forth coherent thoughts was too much for you, darn!

    8. fpherj48 profile image59
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, I know. I repeat myself  When I KNOW an answer, I can be proud. If I copy UR answer, I've done nothing at all. I'm a real~~honest~~authentic person, .even when it's "looks" bad. I'm confident in what I DO know & my ability to keep learning.

  5. mybrianthe fixer profile image61
    mybrianthe fixerposted 5 years ago

    When you take of you probably fly for a few mins untill you get to cruising altitude then the hologram takes over, you most likley stop untill its time to descend and the hologram is switched of. Time is adjusted for the miles you are supposed to travel, though in reality you probably never even got on a plane or left your house. Just a thought..

 
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