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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (5 posts)

Why are people nowadays afraid to acknowledge the word.......EVIL electing inste

  1. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 21 months ago

    Why are people nowadays afraid to acknowledge the word.......EVIL electing instead to use more

    political correct, sensitive, & non-judgmental terms to describe negative human actions & behavior?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/8556955_f260.jpg

  2. profile image57
    Setank Setunkposted 21 months ago

    The term EVIL is more of a moniker these days because we no much more about human behavior. Today we talk about Antisocial personalty disorder. Specifically Psychopathy and Sociopathy. Most would agree that Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin were evil, but they can be more specifically defined as having traits of a Sociopath and a Psychopath.
    There are enough people running around with antisocial personalty disorders that some make to positions of power and do a lot of damage. I would define anyone exhibiting traits of a Sociopath or Psychopath as being Evil.  What do you think?

  3. Paxash profile image97
    Paxashposted 21 months ago

    Are there really that many people electing not to use words like evil or monster to describe certain others? I still see both of those words used pretty frequently when they're called for. And if they're really not being used as frequently, it's probably because someone wants to take a more nuanced view of whatever it is they're describing, seeing as "evil" is such an absolute term.

  4. WiccanSage profile image96
    WiccanSageposted 21 months ago

    I don't use the word 'evil' very often. It is not because I am 'afraid' of it. Evil has certain connotations and I don't wish to be misunderstood when using it.

    Evil is usually associated with some inherently malevolent force, generally considered to have some outside or supernatural basis (devils, demons, some good vs. evil battle in the universe for our souls, etc.).

    I don't believe in these things, so to avoid those connotations I don't use the word 'evil' to simply avoid confusion.

  5. tamarawilhite profile image91
    tamarawilhiteposted 20 months ago

    Politically incorrect is not evil, though it is certainly to the benefit of the politically correct to brand it such. The US separated state and faith to maximize personal freedom, but there are many benefits to uniting them - disobeying the state becomes a sin, so people are much more likely to obey.
    People do avoid the term evil today. Instead, every evil act is blamed on insanity, ignorance, bad environment, inanimate objects or low intelligence.
    This gives them the incorrect assumption that if they talked to everyone about the right ideas, banned the wrong ideas, banned some items - then the world would become perfect. This is an idealistic view, and it is wrong. It feels good to say that if only we'd told him about our ideas, he'd have never done those bad things - and that if we tell him our ideas, he'll never do bad again! It becomes an excuse to proselytize the liberal ideology, ban contrary views, deny personal responsibility for one's actions and makes rehab in theory easy.

    Too many liberals cannot fathom that someone can be intelligent, sane, stable and educated and choose to commit what we consider great evil. The Germans were one of the most scientifically advanced nations in the world, and they decided to systematically eradicate Jews, atheists, homosexuals, Communists, Slavs. I read the people saying "just ban hate, end hate!" Yet the murderers didn't necessarily hate those they killed, saw it instead as improving society by eliminating those they've denied equal status to.
    The same is true of many Muslim terrorists - Allah says this, I get these rewards, killing a few seemingly at random scares a hundred into converting. The greatest good in Islam is not life, as it is with Christianity, but conversions to Islam. Thus killing 10 to "save" 100 who convert out of fear is not only moral but highly moral. But it is easier and feels better to blame poverty, ignorance, insanity than a moral system utterly contradictory to ours ... up until they kill again.
    But admitting the problem is an evil ideology or rational choice by someone to abandon morality for purely selfish reasons is frightening and forces one to admit it is MUCH harder to fight, and that it can't be fought by just talking to people or giving them a toke to fix it.

 
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