Do you get upset when a famous person dies, specifically a celebrity?

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  1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
    Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years ago

    Do you get upset when a famous person dies, specifically a celebrity?

    My mother was always famous for being in hysterics for days following celebrities deaths. I find sadness in some more than others. My father says celebrities deaths shouldn't affect us "normal" people because we don't even know them. I assume these are 3 typical responses; what is typical? What does it say about us if we are saddened by the loss or what does it say if we are not? I'm curious...

  2. Eric Prado profile image73
    Eric Pradoposted 5 years ago

    I got upset when Rue McClanahan died. She played my favorite Golden Girl. It's so hard to believe there is only one left. =/

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I grew up on the Golden Girls! I didn't even know she died; I am at a loss. Who is left Betty White?

    2. Eric Prado profile image73
      Eric Pradoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, Betty White is the only remaining Golden Girl. =/ Rue passed away about two years ago. She will be missed.

    3. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Aww, yes, she will. I used to pretend to be Blanche when growing up, dressing in my mother's heels and silky clothes :-) . Funny, as a child I thought Dorothy was obnoxious and I didn't get her; after watching as an adult I realized she's very funny

    4. FatFreddysCat profile image99
      FatFreddysCatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Betty White is the "Highlander" of "Golden Girls." "THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE!"

    5. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      She's got an awful sense of humor for an old lady. Some of the things she says and does is twice as funny coming out of such a harlmess looking old woman.

  3. wildove5 profile image74
    wildove5posted 5 years ago

    I think it depends on the persons likability and the circumstances of their death that contributes to the level of sadness.  I think it's human nature to feel sad at the loss of life, even if we aren't close to the deceased.  For me I was quite saddened at the loss of Princess Dianna, Patrick Swazye and I don't think there is a single person in the USA who wasn't completely saddened for those who died in 911.  However, being hysterical over the death of an icon is a little excessive.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I remember coming downstairs, my mother screaming..."What's wrong?" She could barely get the words out about Princess Di. That was sad. Maybe not as important a figure, Patrick, that death bothered me because I grew up with him and it seemed too soon

  4. Sherry Hewins profile image97
    Sherry Hewinsposted 5 years ago

    When it's someone who's music, films or TV shows have been an important part of my life, I will mourn for them to some degree. Of course it's not like when a "real" person who is actually a part of your life dies.

    I remember when John Kennedy Jr.'s plane went missing, and then it was discovered he had died, along with his wife and sister-in-law. That made me very sad. The way he grew up in front of the world made me feel like I did kind of know him.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think that it is possible to feel a connection to some of these people that have "been with us" for long periods in our life, in our fondest memories, through good days and bad ones, they are almost a timeline in our life. Some may think it's silly

  5. MickS profile image70
    MickSposted 5 years ago

    No.  Death is a private tragedy for the family to mourn and they should be left to it.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Do you think it is odd to be sad over a celebrity death?

    2. MickS profile image70
      MickSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I remember when that lunatic killed John Lennon, I didn't feel sad, I just felt disbelief that anyone could kill a man that did so much, and gave so much pleasure to so many.

    3. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      John Lennon's "Imagine" touches me more now in his death than it ever would have in his life. He wanted peace and love and was murdered, so sad.

  6. FatFreddysCat profile image99
    FatFreddysCatposted 5 years ago

    It depends on the person. I was bummed when Jim Henson died. Also when Cliff Burton (bassist for Metallica) died. Joey Ramone's passing REALLY bummed me out. Not to the point of hysterics but I was genuinely saddened by his death, esp. since I had met him only a few years before.

    Others, like Princess Diana, Anna Nicole Smith, Michael Jackson, etc. I reacted with a "Well, that sucks, I guess (shrugs shoulders)" and went about my business.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      So it really depends on how the person affects us while living that determines how we respond to their deaths. I was devastated by Jim  Henson's death, I was only days from 8 years old.

  7. Alastar Packer profile image83
    Alastar Packerposted 5 years ago

    Alright, I'll admit to dropping a big fat one when Lucille Ball of I Love Lucy died. Almost so with Mayberry's Andy Griffith lately.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank goodness they both live on through syndication!

    2. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      And in hearts:)

    3. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ...And in Jamestown (NY). I recently visited her hometown and they absolutely celebrate her there; her own museum and portraits painted on big brick buildings!

  8. lburmaster profile image82
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    Not really. It's sad that someone died, it's sad when anyone dies. However, it's easier to remember the life of a celebrity because most of what they have done is on the internet.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I guess that's true, the internet helps keep the memory alive. Do you think the world mourns for a moment and then they are forgotten?
      I am sad thinking that the artist won't be able to make anymore works, especially when it's someone I appreciate.

    2. lburmaster profile image82
      lburmasterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not forgotten, but less remembered. They are added into the history books, much like Michael Jackson. His music will always be legendary. Yet his actions questionable.

    3. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Though he still had hundreds of thousands of followers at the time of his death, imagine how differently he would have gone down in history had he died 10-15 years earlier.

  9. Sharkye11 profile image94
    Sharkye11posted 5 years ago

    I typically feel sad when anyone dies. Even friends of friends of friends whom I have never met. That is empathy. I feel sad for their family and friends who will mourn them and miss them.

    As for celebrities, I definitely don't go into hysterics, but I feel sadness. Especially with ones who have either impacted my life, such as role models or people whom I feel have contributed greatly to the arts or other positive aspects of humanity.

    Like an above Hubber mentioned, Jim Henson was a great loss. As was Gregory Hines. These were people who left an indelible stamp on culture. Not so much people like Anna Nicole Smith.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sharkye11.
      Thank you, It is nice to know that empathy is not dead. I agree, the loss of a loved one is sad and it is hard to not feel for those who are particularly mourning the loss.

  10. Grab a Controller profile image70
    Grab a Controllerposted 5 years ago

    I suppose it depends on the person and the impact they have made in the acting world and community. My examples would have to be MJ and Whitney Houston. I was sad because their music was amazing, but by a few weeks, I just went on with my life.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Both Jackson and Houston were some of the first recognizable faces and voices in my childhood where I also became big fans. Regardless of how weird or dramatic either of their circumstances got as time went on, they were one of a kinds and changed mu

  11. IDONO profile image79
    IDONOposted 5 years ago

    I don't get anymore upset when a celebrity dies than I do a guy down the street. However, the grieving process is different. I don't actually grieve the guy down the street where I may with a celebrity. But that's not being upset over the loss of the person but the loss of what they do.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, maybe grieve would've been a more appropriate word. I absolutely understand what you're saying.

  12. Healthy Mike profile image59
    Healthy Mikeposted 5 years ago

    Yes i do, esp if it is an individual who has had a profound impact in my life. For instance, i was really affected by the death of Michael Jackson, his failings notwithstanding.

    1. Cantuhearmescream profile image80
      Cantuhearmescreamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Despite the controversy surrounding Michael Jackson's last decade, anyone from the 70's and on would have proabably been influenced by his music. He was one of the first recognizable faces and voice in my home, in the 80's... then followed in 90's

 
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