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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (14 posts)

Why is it okay to make fun of Christians but not African Americans or Jewish or

  1. Foodeee profile image78
    Foodeeeposted 4 years ago

    Why is it okay to make fun of Christians but not African Americans or Jewish or Homosexual people?

    I saw something close to this on a news show last night about Bill Maher.

  2. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 4 years ago

    Everyone gets made fun of or is the butt of a joke including white men, blondes, women in general, blacks, Asians, gays, people from the south or whatever. Oftentimes it's not that the subject of the joke is offensive but rather the bite or bitterness laced within in the joke. Even ministers have been known to tell religious jokes. Joel Osteen is famous for starting each sermon with a Christian joke. 
    I suspect your real question is: Where is the protest when the Christian jokes roll out.
    My guess is not many conservative Christians watch the Bill Maher show and could care less about him or his jokes. Secondly most Christians are likely to believe they will have the "last laugh" and therefore don't put too much stock into things happening in the world. "The squeaky wheel gets the grease!"
    If Christians choose not to protest a show or person's statements that is on them. It's up to the (offended party) to "make the noise" to get the media's attention and their sponsors. You'd probably have to ask the Christians why they're not up in arms.
    Note: Religion still does have clout. No person is likely to ever be elected president of the U.S. who boldly states they are an atheist!

    1. Foodeee profile image78
      Foodeeeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      That is a clear and well written response and you do an excellent job of answering the question without creating more outcry. You make points that I have not thought of. Thank you very much for making the world a little bit nicer today.

  3. mgeorge1050 profile image79
    mgeorge1050posted 4 years ago

    I am of the opinion that one cannot choose their sexual orientation or race, they are simply born into it.  Christians tend to shove their goofy opinions up everyone's nose and judge the actions of others constantly, while their  religion teaches the exact opposite.  It is kind of hard not to make fun of this ironic behavior.  There are different kinds of humor, so a clear opinion is hard to develop.  However, I tend to think the jokes on Christians are just accepted by the public better because Christians choose that lifestyle despite painfully obvious logical flaws within it's teachings.  Plus, they won't judge you for poking a little fun at them, right?

    1. Foodeee profile image78
      Foodeeeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Race is not a choice of course. Sexual orientation is still a matter of debate. However I can't accept the idea that choice is the overlying reason that a group of individuals can be judged or be made fun of.

    2. M. T. Dremer profile image96
      M. T. Dremerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Sexual orientation is no longer debatable. One study suggests that it's a byproduct of women's immune systems 'attacking' the fetus while she is pregnant. More studies may dig deeper, but there is agreement that it's not a choice.

    3. profile image0
      Dave36posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hey M.T.Dremer sexual orientation is no longer debatable, as one study suggests something?....More studies may dig deeper?....I'm not having a go at you buddy, but come on now....How do you conclude that, from one study that only suggests something?.

    4. M. T. Dremer profile image96
      M. T. Dremerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      The study that I'm referring to only focused on why men are gay: because the presence of the male fetus is regarded by the mother's body as a foreign object. More needs to be done to determine why women can be gay. It's not a choice.

    5. mgeorge1050 profile image79
      mgeorge1050posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hey Dave36, I have heard of many instances where gay people committed suicide because their family would not accept their lifestyle.  All studies aside, this has to be some indication of an inability to choose sexual orientation.

    6. Foodeee profile image78
      Foodeeeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      There is too much gray area in the homosexual world for it to a clear cut born in that's the way I am kinda thing. You have bisexual people some people who are gay now that go straight and vica versa. Way too many factors in up bringing for any clear

  4. profile image0
    sheilamyersposted 4 years ago

    I can't answer for all Christians, but my outlook on the situation is that the more I would rant and rave about being made fun of is the worse the person will get. That probably sounds lame to some people and to others like I'm scared to stand up for myself. Very untrue. In reality, I just don't care what other people think. The only person's opinion I have to worry about when it comes to my beliefs is the God I believe is real.

  5. junkseller profile image84
    junksellerposted 4 years ago

    Everyone can be made fun of (and should be made fun of). Pretty much everyone is at least a little bit funny, but that doesn't mean you can ignore historical and situational context. Black people can make fun of other black people but white people cant. Why? Because we used to lock them in chains and buy and sell them.

    I have gay friends and to them I might make gay jokes. That's okay because they are friends and they know I am fully on their side, but you'll never catch me making such a joke in public. Context matters.

    Christians have no history (recent anyway) of being persecuted. That's a good thing for them and the consequence of not being historically discriminated against is they are fair game when it comes to jokes. All in all, I think that is a decent deal.

    That doesn't mean some jokes aren't mean-spirited, and I don't condone those against anyone, but at the same time, some people take themselves far too seriously.

    1. mgeorge1050 profile image79
      mgeorge1050posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Great comment as usual.

  6. M. T. Dremer profile image96
    M. T. Dremerposted 4 years ago

    As a rule of thumb, I would say it's bad form to make fun of someone for something they can't change, or someone who is doing no harm to others. So, in matters of race or sexual orientation, they can't suddenly swap it out for something else, and in many cases it's very difficult to hide. It would be like making fun of someone because they have blue eyes or blonde hair; it's just cruel.

    And, even though people make fun of the government, it doesn't mean that it would be okay to make fun of that nice postal worker who delivers your mail. They aren't harming anyone, so again it would be cruel to single them out.

    So, it wouldn't be right to make fun of a Christian who is a nice person. But that doesn't mean the religion, as a mechanism, isn't going to catch the eyes of comedians.

    Also, Bill Maher is kind of a jerk and shouldn't be used as the standard for what we can and can't make fun of. In much the same way that any offensive comedian shouldn't be used as a standard.

 
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