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Lovers of Film Noir

  1. wingedcentaur profile image85
    wingedcentaurposted 7 years ago

    Film noir refers to movies of, say, the 30s, 40s, 50s, and perhaps early 60s (perhaps) of the black  and white era (glorious black and white). These films were rugged and gritty crime stories. Maltese Falcon (Humprhey Bogart) is one of the most obvious and easiest examples. Most Bogart movies fall into that category -- all those private detective movies he starred in.

    One of my favorites is a 1946 classic based on a short story by Ernest Hemmingway called "The Killers." The movie is the The Killers (1946) starring the legendary Burt Lancaster and Ava Gardner. This is a movie that could stand up well to anything being produced by Hollywood today.

    In fact I think it would be pretty cool in Quentin Tarantino did a remake of this movie. So, if you like film noir, what's your favorite and why?

    1. WryLilt profile image79
      WryLiltposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I enjoyed the movie memento, which I believe falls into he category of neo-noir.

      1. wingedcentaur profile image85
        wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Good Day WryLit

        Welcome to the thread and thank you for joining our discussion. Yes, I enjoyed Memento as well. It was definitely gritty crime drama, no doubt about it. Film noir, however, refers to movies from the black and white era before color. The movies of that era have a certain feel that is unmistakable compared to cinema of today. We are concerned with the 30s, 40s, and 50s era movies. Humprhey Bogart movies would be examples of what I mean.

        Yes also, your designation of "neo-noir" is a good and apt one for Memento -- you could put it that way.

        Thanks

    2. Ron Montgomery profile image60
      Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for the explanation of the term "noir".  I've heard it used a lot, but never knew the meaning other than the period reference.  "The Killers" is probably my favorite of this genre.  "China Town" would probably be considered noir if it had been made a decade earlier.

      1. wingedcentaur profile image85
        wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Welcome to the thread Ron Montgomery

        Thank you for joining our conversation. You're right! How could I forget about China Town, the Jack Nicholson classic! And I think you're quite right too, it would have been film noir if it had been made a decade earlier.

        You like The Killers (1946) too? Good. Don't you think Quentin Tarantino would do wonders with that film doing a remake of it? Can't you visualize that?

        1. Ron Montgomery profile image60
          Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          The film would certainly be bloodier. smile  Quentin would probably cast himself as the diner manager and maybe George Clooney as the insurance company investigator.

          Another Hemingway story I'd like to see made into a movie (unless it has been already) is "The Old Man and the Sea."  It would be a lot like "Castaway".

          1. wingedcentaur profile image85
            wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Hey R.M.

            Who would you cast as "The Swede," you know the former boxer Ole Anderson?

            The Old Man and the Sea was made into a movie starring Spencer Tracy.

            1. Ron Montgomery profile image60
              Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Dolph Lundgren ? smile

              Maybe Daniel Day Lewis.  Change his nickname from Swede to Butcher.

              1. wingedcentaur profile image85
                wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

                Daniel Day Lewis is an interesting choice. You know, I was thinking of Daniel Craig from Casino Royale and Quantum Solace. Daniel Day Lewis, huh?

  2. timorous profile image90
    timorousposted 7 years ago

    My all-time favourite film-noir movie is "Double Indemnity" (1944), with Barbara Stanwyck, Fred McMurray, and Edward G. Robinson.  A must-see.

    A really good spoof of the genre is "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid", starring Steve Martin.

    1. wingedcentaur profile image85
      wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Welcome to the thread timorous

      I'm familiar with both of those movies, and you're spot on. Double Indemnity involving a corrupt insurance salesman Walter Neff, was quite a change of pace for Fred Macmurray (remember the sitcom "My Three Sons" and the movie, the original "Flubber?"). I really liked his performance in Double Indemnity. Edward G. Robinson stole every scene he was in, of course, as Walter Neff's manager, an obsessive with insurance statistics, always able to tell a fraudulent case when his "little man" acts up and so forth.

      Great choice!

    2. couturepopcafe profile image59
      couturepopcafeposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Love, love, love Stanwyck.  I think out of all the noir actresses, she is my favorite.  Also, Angels With Dirty Faces, love Cagney in anything, and Laura.  Love Bogey, Bacall, Bette Davis, (who they said did not have a Hollywood "film" face) Cagney, Edward G. Robinson, early Lucille Ball.  What was the movie where she was in a wheelchair and her husband wheeled her to Florida because she was such a demanding and spoiled
      b--ch?

      1. wingedcentaur profile image85
        wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Lucille Ball! There's a classic noir actress. I bet most people who know her from "I Love Lucy" do not have any idea that she played much, much darker, indeed more sinister roles (extremely well too) early in her career, and especially in radio.

        Welcome to the thread couturepopcafe and thank you for invoking that legend!

  3. profile image56
    HOLLYWOODHYPEposted 7 years ago

    A Tarantino remake of The Killers would be exciting I admit and he devotes a large part of his time to keeping arthouse theatres open where you can actually go and see these classics. 
    I'm a major Hitchcock fan.  To my mind you can't beat REAR WINDOW or PSYCHO ( which Gus Van Sandt did an appalling remake of about 10 years ago. )  I also loved KEY LARGO.   Barbra-Lee

    1. wingedcentaur profile image85
      wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Welcome to the thread HollywoodHype

      Thank you for joining us today. I'm glad you agree with me about "The Killers." I'm a Hitchcock fan myself -- how can any self-respecting fan of film noir not be? Those are great choices.

      Also, I'm glad you agree with me about "The Killers." Tell me: who do you think Tarantino should cast?

      You know who I would put in the role of Ole Anderson "The Swede?" Daniel Craig from Casino Royale and Quantum Solace. Yep, I'd put a British actor in that slot. Okay, as a last resort I'd cast someone obvious like Bruce Willis (but he always gets cast in Tarantino movies!).

      By the way, I'd have to say my favorite Hitchock films are: Dial M' for Murder with Ray Milland an Grace Kelly and Strangers on a Train, which was actually an adaptation from the novel by literary crime novelist Patricia Highsmith.

      1. timorous profile image90
        timorousposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Strangers on a Train for sure!!!

  4. SomewayOuttaHere profile image60
    SomewayOuttaHereposted 7 years ago

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a fav...old Bette Davis movies...Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte....i think they both fit the category.  and...in Cold Blood (not sure of the years)

    mornin' all...

    1. wingedcentaur profile image85
      wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      What's happening SOH?

      Welcome to the thread. To Kill A Mockingbird is one of my all-time favorites. That's an excellent choice. And speaking of Gregory Peck, another classic noir film comes to mind: Cape Fear. I'm not talking about the one done in the nineties starring Robert Deniro --  remember our subject is film noir! No, I mean the one starring Gregory Peck and his opposite number played by Robert Mitchum (who also appeared as a cop in the Deniro movie) as Max Cady!

      1. couturepopcafe profile image59
        couturepopcafeposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Really good movie, Cape Fear.  The original was better but new one was suprisingly good for a remake.

        1. wingedcentaur profile image85
          wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Welcome to the thread couturepopcafe

          Thank you for joining our discussion. Yes, the original Cape Fear was by far superior to the remake. I find myself cold toward the remake though I usually love anything with the legend Robert Deniro -- his performance was too monstrous and horrifying for me. Remember the chilling scene after he picked up the woman at the bar and he took her back to his hotel room?...... Do you remember that scene?

          1. couturepopcafe profile image59
            couturepopcafeposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Not really.  But from what I do remember, it was more horrifying.  That's the major difference in the genre.  The noirs could tell the same story with class and without resorting to graphic horror.

            1. wingedcentaur profile image85
              wingedcentaurposted 7 years agoin reply to this

              Agreed couturepopcafe: "The noirs could tell the same story with class and without resorting to grahic horror."

              I concur!

  5. The Jet profile image81
    The Jetposted 6 years ago

    Following was pretty awesome neo-noir film. Christopher Nolan's first film.

    But as for vintage noir -- I'd say a lot Hitchcock greats had to be noir. Vertigo. And my personal favorite, Rear Window. I don't know if Psycho or Shadow of a Doubt were noir films... if they were, then they'd fall under my favorite Hitchcock noir peices.

  6. ajwrites57 profile image82
    ajwrites57posted 4 years ago

    Just finished watching "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers" with Barbara Stanwyck, Van Heflin, Lizabeth Scott and Kirk Douglas (his first movie, I believe). All these actors did several noir thrillers each. Film noir is fanatastic medium for raw character studies--especially love, greed, passion and obsession!

 
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