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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (27 posts)

How much longer will movies last?

  1. Daffy Duck profile image60
    Daffy Duckposted 7 years ago

    It seems like there are more and more remakes as time goes by.  Most of the remakes don't do well.  Should the makers stop remaking movies?

    Is it just me or do movies seem to resemble eachother more and more.  It seems like origional stories are becoming more rare.  There are some great origional stories like "Harry Potter"  "Lord of the Rings" and so on.  It's like writers are starting to run out of ideas.

    If this is true, when do you think ticket sales will start to decline?

    How long before theatres lose too much buisness?

    Will it ever get to that point or will ticket sales always do well?  hmm

    1. recommend1 profile image69
      recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Amercian movies are at a standstill because American culture is at a standstill (or regressing).   There is nothing new in front to make any kind of art about it is all behind and so the remakes, prequels etc.

      As pscheskinner says - you need to find movies from outside the US if you want to see anything new.  I would recommend Korean movies for pure technical brilliance that does not depend on effects, don't worry about the language issue they would still be too obscure to understand even with it, or understandable from the visual images.  Japan has excellent cartoon, France has excellent cinema if you can understand French, there are some really good action movies coming out of Russia and China has loads of movies but all in Chinese  -  I guess someone will soon get around to subtitling or dubbing them all in English, now that could cause an explosion of new viewing !

      1. Daffy Duck profile image60
        Daffy Duckposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        So foreign movies are the way to go?  I wonder how they would be received in the US in the major theatres and with the public.  That's pretty interesting.  hmm

        I wouldn't mind seeing something different.

        1. recommend1 profile image69
          recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          They are available everywhere else in the world, and can often be found free download online.

          1. psycheskinner profile image82
            psycheskinnerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            Hopefully free legal download, or you are contributing to the decline, not the revival of indy film making.

      2. shogan profile image84
        shoganposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I think there are plenty of great American-made films, recommend1, but they aren't the ones that get the press.  Hollywood isn't the place to look for originality.

      3. spottykat profile image59
        spottykatposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I suggest French films (or German). There is a lot of new material out there. You have to know where to look. And it doesn't matter if the films are new or not. Each country has a unique style of films.

        1. recommend1 profile image69
          recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          You are right, although I find most French films too self-centred arty farty for my taste, german films trundle along a bit like a tram on rails and the really really good films I would like to watch are in a language I don't know with subtitles Ican't read !!

          I can't wait for really good voice translation software - we could watch movies from anywhere then !  In the short term, online translation may be good enough to deal with translating subtitles in the near future and that would do for now.

    2. mrpopo profile image74
      mrpopoposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      How dare you compare Harry Potter to Lord of the Rings... tongue

    3. tony0724 profile image58
      tony0724posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Actually from what I observe this has been going on a long time now. Hollywood has been out of Ideas for awhile. All we get now are superheroes , sequels and prequels. I just wait for them to get to Redbox. And I just stick to alot of Indie movies. I wrote a hub over a year ago about how movies are not worth wasting a dime on. The shame is I am sure there are some good creative minds out there but Hollywood goes with product recognition in order to insure box office numbers.

    4. Freegoldman profile image36
      Freegoldmanposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Till john travolta shall be alive.....

  2. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 7 years ago

    If you watch movies in places other than chain cinemas you will see that there are probably more movies of more types being made then ever before now that digital technology as lowered the barrier to entry.

    1. Daffy Duck profile image60
      Daffy Duckposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      That's true, but is more (more digital effects) better?  In the Matrix movies the first one is the best.  The other two fell short in my opinion because there was more digital effects, and those effects were very noticeable.  Complete overkill.

      1. psycheskinner profile image82
        psycheskinnerposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        I was talking about digital technology, being able to create movies cheaply because you no longer need to use film.  That has nothing to do with digital effects which is a whole different issue.  there are people out there making good movies suitable for wide release now for a budget of under $500,000(sometimes under $50,000) which was unheard of 5 years ago.

      2. shogan profile image84
        shoganposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Just as a quick note, I think the second and third Matrix movies were terrible because their storylines forgot the "everyman" quality that made the first one so good.

  3. mega1 profile image78
    mega1posted 7 years ago

    I don't think its all remakes - its true that it depends on where you're looking and what reviewers you listen to -  in the indy movie theaters there are some great films - lots of really good off-beat stories especially and documentaries, too.  The Hollywood genre may be on its way out, but they will still be making gorgeous movies of all kinds as long as there is money to be made - Pirates of the Carribean 4 made another box office splash last weekend - over 90 mil - and I saw it, it was pretty great, but then I'm mad about Johnny and Penelope was a great female lead for him.  All you have to do is look further and you'll find great directors, actors and camera work and all the people who make films just keep getting better and better, imo!

    1. Daffy Duck profile image60
      Daffy Duckposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Documentaries are becoming more popular.  THX mega.   Feedback appreciated.  smile

  4. Rafini profile image87
    Rafiniposted 7 years ago

    I think the problem is that the movie production companies put out too many movies - one of the reasons I rarely go out to the movies.  Cuz by the time I have the money to see the movie I want to see, it isn't in the theater's anymore. 

    With netflix and many movies going direct to DVD, I wouldn't be too surprised to discover movie theaters going out of style - look what's happened with the internet & social media, and now ebooks.  I mean, if you can purchase an ebook without ever leaving home, why not movies?

    1. recommend1 profile image69
      recommend1posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      You can already do all of that except for new release movies, this is why 3D is being tried along with other enhancements that cannot be reproduced in your living room - then you have to go cinema to see them.  I saw Avatar in 3D and it was a good viewing experience, out of 3D it was just a sad old old movie plot re-run in a new location.

      1. Rafini profile image87
        Rafiniposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Exactly!  And what's to prevent television from developing the capabilities of 3D?  Looks to me like it's a possibility...then nobody will ever have to leave home again.

        1. Stevennix2001 profile image91
          Stevennix2001posted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Actually Rafini, electronic companies have already thought about that, and there's currently 3-D tvs on the market today that allow you to watch movies like avatar in 3-d at home.  not only that, but the 3-d tvs can easily switch to being a high definition 2-d tv too if you prefer. The only thing is you still have to wear the glasses, but I heard supposedly they're working on that problem too to where you won't need the glasses to see it in 3-D soon.

          1. Rafini profile image87
            Rafiniposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            lol   Oh.  I thought those commercials for 3D and 4D TV's were a joke.  lol  ooops!

  5. Diane Inside profile image78
    Diane Insideposted 7 years ago

    nah there will always be new movies, it just goes in phases, for awhile you will see new and interesting stuff, then for a time there will be what seems to be the same old stuff.

    You notice every couple of years or so.

  6. Stevennix2001 profile image91
    Stevennix2001posted 7 years ago

    No, movies will never go out of style, as society is always looking for a form of escapism.  Back before TV or movies were invented, people would often attend plays in which various playrights would sometimes copy or derive stories based on previous plays done in the past.  When movies came along, it was kind of the same thing. However, people tend to forget about things over time, and often over look it. 

    Another thing to keep in mind is that Hollywood producers generally don't put out movies that are unproven on whether or not it can make money.  For you see, most films are set up to where if the film doesn't make a profit, then nobody ever gets paid.  Granted, there are some exceptions as actors like Will Smith will sign guaranteed contracts, due to their star power.  However, most actors and Hollywood crews only make money if the film itself makes money.  Meaning that most Hollywood producers aren't going to spend over 200 million dollars promoting a movie that introduces a bold new concept without some reassurance that they'll see a safe return on their investment.

    That's why Hollywood typically favors remakes, reboots, sequels and recently prequels, as those are proven assets since it's based on a established name brand. 

    Don't get me wrong, there are quite a few independent films out there that offer a lot of originality, but people hardly ever see those.  No, people would much rather see a cliche ridden Adam Sandler film where people know exactly what happens at the end before they even buy a freaking ticket, than spending money on purchasing a ticket to a film that's a indie film that's highly acclaimed.  Look at the "Hurt Locker" and "Avatar" for examples.  One was a indie movie while the other was a big budget film that was kind of a rip off of "Last of the Mohicans" and "Ferngully" when you break down the plot to it's simplest context.  The reality is that Hollywood tends to favor films they know will make them money, and people are too ignorant to know better and will see whatever Hollywood markets heavily.  I hate to phrase it like that, but it's true.   

    Bottom line:  If you want original content in movies versus more remakes, reboots, sequels and whatnot, then you should start paying to see more films that offer more original content.  After all, the only reason hollywood continues to favor more sequels, prequels, remakes and reboots is because of the proven marketability of it.  If you see enough original content, the it just might influence more Hollywood producers to release more films that offer more original content than ripping off other movies.  Just a suggestion.

  7. optimus grimlock profile image59
    optimus grimlockposted 7 years ago

    movies wont go away. theres somthing great about taking your family to the movies once in awhile its one of the things you charish as a family or a big time movie buff!

  8. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 7 years ago

    "Movies" doesn't have to imply going to the theater either.  These things will keep being made, they may not be viewed in the same places/ways.

  9. profile image47
    Leenaz12posted 7 years ago

    They are available everywhere else in the world, and can often be found free download online.

 
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