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Why Choose Cloth Diapers

Updated on February 8, 2015

What you need to know about Cloth Diapers and Cloth Diapering

If you haven’t used cloth diapers recently, you probably wouldn’t recognize them. Long gone are the days of sticking yourself with a diaper pin, or folding stacks of white cotton diapers. The cloth diapers of your grandmother’s day have been replaced with a cloth diapering system that is much more convenient and reliable.

Today, reusable diapers come in a variety of styles and colors. You can get two piece diapering sets, which consists of a pre-folded cotton diaper and a leak-proof cover. Additional inserts are available for heavy wetters or nighttime use. There are all-in-one diapers, which as the name implies incorporates the diaper and cover into one piece. And, there’s the pocket diaper, which is similar; they have a water-proof outer layer with an absorbent cotton or hemp insert.

The Convenience and Benefits of Cloth Diapers

Fuzzi Bunz Cloth Diapers

FuzziBunz Cloth Diapering
FuzziBunz Cloth Diapering

These modern cloth diapers are also pinless! Most use a system of adjustable snap settings at the waist and legs; these small plastic snaps last for years and make adjusting the diaper for a snug fit incredibly easy. I’ve seen some diapers and wraps, or covers, which have Velcro closures, while this might seem like a great feature, I definitely prefer the snaps. Velcro is fast and easy, but there’s always that rough edge around the Velcro that I didn’t want touching my baby’s tummy. My other complaint with Velcro was it picked up bits of fuzz and string in the wash. I know you can fasten them closed for washing, but I always felt like I would get a better wash if they were open and allowed to move freely through the wash and rinse cycles. Also, be prepared … cloth diapers can take some time to dry. If you have it closed up, good luck!


With the renewed interest in cloth diapering, many companies have developed cotton diapers and diaper covers that are remarkably convenient and cute. Fuzzibunz, BumGenius and the gDiaper are three popular companies that make exceptional cotton diapers and cloth diaper covers.

Many parents turn to cloth diapering as a way of “going green.” However, it’s becoming increasingly popular for both health and financial reasons. The average child will go through approximately 7,500 diapers before they are potty trained. If you have ever purchased disposable diapers, you know they aren’t cheap! The estimated cost to diaper a child in single-use diapers is about $2,700. Cloth diapering is considerably cheaper, you can get started with cloth diapering with an initial investment as low as $200. There is the additional expense of water and detergent to clean cloth diapers, but this cost is negligible in comparison to the ongoing expense of disposables. And, if you plan on having more than one child, the cost of cloth diapering goes down even more. Your initial investment can cover the cost of diapering multiple children and cloth diapers can be used over-and-over again, significantly reducing the overall cost.


Another big concern among parents switching to cloth diapering is the desire to keep harmful chemicals away from their baby. Disposable diaper companies consistently refuse to disclose exactly what is in the diaper and the reason for secrecy is abundantly clear. Disposable diapers contain a host of toxic chemicals including dioxin, which is an extremely toxic by-product of the bleaching process. They also contain sodium polyacrylate, this is the same clear gel-like material often found on your baby’s bottom and genitals during a diaper change. This substance was banned for use in tampons in 1985 because it was linked to Toxic Shock Syndrome. Recent studies have also linked disposable diapers and their harsh toxic substances and perfumes to an increased incidence of asthma.

One of the common concerns regarding cloth diapering is that it is inconvenient, but that usually comes from those who haven’t tried it. Cloth diapering is not any more inconvenient than using disposables. If the diaper is soiled, it needs to be rinsed in the toilet to remove any excrement; this should be done with disposables as well as cloth diapers. Read your package of diapers and you’ll see this stated clearly. Disposing of human excrement in the trash is illegal, granted most people skip this part, but that’s all the more reason to worry. Improper disposal of human waste is a breeding ground for disease and bacteria.


Cloth Diapering
Cloth Diapering

Reusable Diapers

Now the real difference is whether you want to throw that dirty diaper in your trash or drop it in a diaper pail. Throw it in the trash and you’ll need to run to the store and spend more money and buy more diapers. Drop in the diaper pail and you will need to wash them. Personally, I would rather dump the pail into my washing machine than run to the store and shell out more money. And, unless you are still doing laundry by hand, your washing machine is going to do all the work.

Why would someone choose to use cloth diapers? Maybe the question should be why wouldn’t they?

A cotton diaper is soft and gentle against your baby’s skin. Have you felt a disposable diaper? No matter what these diapers company’s try to make you believe, would you want to sleep with it? They are hard, there is no air circulation making them hot and irritating, they smell and make weird plastic noise. Cotton is free of chemicals, soft, cuddly and comfortable, why do you think they are called fuzzi bunz? Cloth diapers are reusable diapers, so they are also the ultimate in “green”, no more disposable diapers being dumped into the landfill. Even when a cloth diapers out lives it’s usefulness for covering your baby’s bottom, it can be turned into an excellent rag!

If you want soft diapers cloth is definitely the way to go.

Comments

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  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    7 years ago

    ggenda, that's wonderful news! Don't you just love that soft cuddly feeling? who thought diapering could be so fun? lol I haven't heard of the Itti Bitti diapers, but there seem to be more and more coming out as cloth diapering regains its popularity. Thanks for the update!

  • ggenda profile image

    ggenda 

    7 years ago from USA

    Lamme - we just switched a few days ago, and so far it's great. Have you heard of Itti Bitti Cloth Diapers? I read great reviews for them.

    And yes - my sweet little girl loves her Fuzzibunz! She giggles every time I go to change her. Much, much more comfy. And bye bye diaper rash!

  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    7 years ago

    Hi ggenda, it's great to hear you're making the switch! I think you're going to find it very easy and both you and your baby will love it :)

  • ggenda profile image

    ggenda 

    7 years ago from USA

    This is a great article! We are making the switch the cloth, and this just backs up all of our reasons.

  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    7 years ago

    Hi Nicco, yes cloth diapers are making a big comeback! These are no long the cloth diapers of years ago, the new modern reusable diapers are extremely cute and very easy to take care of.

  • profile image

    Nicco 

    7 years ago

    I hadn't realized that using cloth diapers had become so popular again. This is good news and probably much better for baby as well.

  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    8 years ago

    Pollyannalana, it's really a very personal choice, but the cloth diapers that are available now are so easy to take care of. At least you gave it a try :) Thanks for your comments.

  • Pollyannalana profile image

    Pollyannalana 

    8 years ago from US

    My husband was in military and gone with my first one and I was 21 and I used cloth diapers I guess because my mom bought them for me and said here do this....anyway one day I woke up and said,"Hey... you got money, you got a charge card, go buy pampers!"...and I did. I changed mine so often tho and used so much Vaseline there was never any diaper rash. That poop thing just was not for me and still isn't but with the cost today I am sure many would have a better thing with those. Mine were trained by about a year old too, the first one had more accidents but still good by two. If they murder someone some day it will probably be pampers fault, not mine.

  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    8 years ago

    akirchner, that is so true. Have you felt those disposable diapers? Who would want to wear that 24/7 for 3 years? I can only imagine how hot they get too, not to mention being exposed to the chemicals and other harsh ingredients. Oh and those rags ... you have to love them! I even had friends and neighbors asking me to save old diapers for them to use as rags, LOL Talk about recycling!

  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    8 years ago

    BKCreative, congratulations on the upcoming grandbaby! I used cloth diapers with mine and loved it and I really didn't find it difficult at all. You might want to look at baby slings too. I used a sling to carry my babies even while doing chores around the house ... they LOVED it.

  • akirchner profile image

    Audrey Kirchner 

    8 years ago from Washington

    I never used hardly a disposable diaper on all 3 of my kids and was wondering what folks did nowadays! Thanks for sharing this wonderful information. I loved using cloth diapers and can't imagine why folks use disposables to be honest....harder on the environment and to be honest, harder on baby's skin! (Plus you will have dust clothes and polishing rags for many, many years to come!)

  • BkCreative profile image

    BkCreative 

    8 years ago from Brooklyn, New York City

    Those diapers look great - when mine were babies it was cloth all the way. And we had something called 'a diaper service' here in NYC where someone would pick them all up maybe 2-3 times a week and bring you a fresh load.

    Then of course came all the disposable ones filling the land fills and I doubt are healthy. So with a new grandchild due in February. I will stock up for some serious gift giving and grandparenting.

    Thanks for the hub. I'll bookmark it and share with my son and daughter in law!

  • Lamme profile imageAUTHOR

    Lamme 

    8 years ago

    kaltopsyd, when the time comes, I hope you consider cloth diapers. It's really not as hard as people think and it's so much nicer for baby. Thanks for reading!

  • kaltopsyd profile image

    kaltopsyd 

    8 years ago from Trinidad originally, but now in the USA

    You made some really great points in this Hub. I guess I have some years to consider cloth diapers (before I'm married and a mother-to-be). :-)

    Very nicely written information. Thanks!

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