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Are all of your ducks in a row if something were to happen to you?

  1. brittvan22 profile image82
    brittvan22posted 4 years ago

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/7761985_f248.jpg
    Death is not something we like to dwell on in this society much. It is however, a very important part of the life transition. Sometimes unforeseen events happen and without your little duckies being all lined up you may inevitable cause more unintential stress to love ones. So are all your ducks in a row, if yes, what prompted you to do so? If not, why haven't you?

  2. WriteAngled profile image85
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    I do not understand your question.

    The only connotations "ducks in a row" have for me are (a) a shooting gallery at a fun fair, and (b) the flying duck wall ornaments that used to be popular and are now a subject of great mirth.

    What do either of these have to do with the hammer of fate?

    1. MelissaBarrett profile image61
      MelissaBarrettposted 4 years agoin reply to this
    2. brittvan22 profile image82
      brittvan22posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      In other words are your affairs in order. Because if they are not your loved ones will have a mess on their hands. You need a living will. I have experienced this personally for myself as well as watched other relatives battle their own members in court over something that could have been handled by having a living will. When money is involved and property people can lose all sense of what's right and what's wrong.

    3. brittvan22 profile image82
      brittvan22posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It is an expression, in this instance, it means do you have your affairs in order?

  3. WriteAngled profile image85
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    Oh, what a very strange expression!

    I no longer have a partner, so do not need life insurance.

    I see no point in paying for a funeral upfront, since there will be more than enough in the bank to cover it.

    I have absolutely no interest in the format of my funeral. I hope my daughters will simply pick whatever is the simplest and cheapest option at the time.

    I did write a will a long time ago. Some of it is no longer relevant since my partner died. Everything will be equally divided between my two daughters, regardless of their respective life situations at the time.

    1. brittvan22 profile image82
      brittvan22posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I know it seems simple enough to you, but if you do not have a written will, it is up to the probate judge to decide how your estate is divided. If there is no living will, then they will assume you have no wishes and the decision is left up to the to appoint someone over your estate and such.

  4. denise.w.anderson profile image92
    denise.w.andersonposted 4 years ago

    We recently went through guardianship proceedings with our daughter having disabilities. As a result, we realized that we need to have a number of documents in place. Using Legacy Writer, an internet-based legal document creation tool, we were able to write our wills, power of attorneys and advanced directive for medical care. It is a relief to get it all done.

    1. brittvan22 profile image82
      brittvan22posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It is very necessary. I worked in an environment with persons with mental and physical disabilities and boy oh boy you would not believe what goes on in some of the care facilities and group homes. It's sad, because sometimes family think it's the best thing to be in a populace amongst their peers and to a degree it is true, but as far as, living quarters, if it can be helped, they should be with family. It is a true statement that no one can love and care for your children like you in the best case scenario.

  5. Uninvited Writer profile image84
    Uninvited Writerposted 4 years ago

    I keep meaning to write a will just to ensure if my cat outlives me that he will be taken care of. I have no other reason to have one.

  6. RBJ33 profile image62
    RBJ33posted 4 years ago

    Holy Cow - what a collection of unusual comments to your forum.  My ducks are all in a row - I hope I haven't missed anything.  I even have a written document titled "Just in Case" stored on my desktop that gives lots, and lots of info to the kids - instructions, knowledge of where things are and why.  Folks should check the laws in their state to see what happens if you die without a will - does the state make the decisions on who gets what?  Does probate have any negative effects?

    My father is my inspiration for getting my ducks in a row, because his ducks were lined up in perfect order - it made it much easier on his kids - thanks Dad.

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image84
      Uninvited Writerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Well, I don't have much to leave to anyone. My sister is my beneficiary for my pension funds already.

      1. brittvan22 profile image82
        brittvan22posted 4 years agoin reply to this

        If you leave someone out of your will such as your spouse, for whatever reason, they can contest your will and it could possibility be over turned. If you leave in SC doesn't matter if you haven't lived together for 10 or 20 years if you didn't separate from them, they are entitled to their spousal share. In SC there is no such thing as a separation technically, you are either married or not married.  It is so technical that even if you were pursuing a divorce before your death if the ruling doesn't happen before you die, it doesn't even count in SC. There are so many technicalities. Also if you have a minor child that you were primary parent for and their father/mother was out of the picture, although they didn't take care of the child, they have rights and to even probate the deceased parents estate you have to find that parent and get them to sign a waiver. That's why I think having your ducks in a row is so important.

    2. brittvan22 profile image82
      brittvan22posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      You are very wise, what most don't understand is that the courts will be making the decision for you if you don't make it for yourself.

      1. profile image0
        Brenda Durhamposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        I don't have living will arrangements nor a regular will.  Yet.  But trying to see my way to making those soon.   At least a regular will.
        The living will.........if that means wishes for medical treatment or withdrawal, etc.............I'm not so sure about that one.   So far, my experience seeing people go that route has been pretty bad.   I personally think the "living will" started being pushed by the insurance companies and hospitals who got tired of footing the cost of the care of helpless individuals at the end of their lives or those who linger; no one knows how to deal with them for sure.    And while I can understand that, the truth is that NO ONE really has the right to make that judgement call.   No, not even the person him/herself.

        1. Uninvited Writer profile image84
          Uninvited Writerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          A living will is so that you wishes are followed, not what others do. A regular will will do that.

  7. paradigmsearch profile image93
    paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago

    I sense duck pics in this thread's future...

 
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