No gifts

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  1. Sauvignon profile image55
    Sauvignonposted 8 years ago

    Is it okay to ask your kids to give up their toys to needy children?

    1. profile image0
      Mamie B.posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Sauvignon! I wouldn't ask children to give up their new and/or favorite toys because the toys are not mine to give. I may ask my kids if they have any toys, clothes, and maybe books to give to children who don't have any because of poverty or a house fire etc... I would make sure to use an age appropriate vocabulary. Kids are usually giving by nature and even more  when they grow up in a giving environment. If they see mom and dad helping at goodwill or soup kitchens, or someone in the neighborhood, they eagerly follow in their footsteps.

      My husband and I started our lives together helping whenever we could. We still do. Now our kids and their kids find ways of giving whenever they can. They are always happy to help out. We can tell by the smiles on their faces and twinkle in their eyes.

      MamieB

      1. profile image0
        sneakorocksolidposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Great advice!

    2. Merriweather profile image54
      Merriweatherposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I get my kids to help pick out toys for a "Samaritan's Purse" box or to donate through our church, but I don't ask them to donate a toy of their own.  I think it may be more meaningful to chip in with allowance money and go shop for this unknown child.  Imagining what s/he will think of the gift is fun, and since it is only a matter of time before they find out the truth about Santa, I think that's a great way to teach them that Santa isn't one person, but a spirt of Christmas.  (OK, so that blurs the line between Santa and Jesus, but I'll work that out later).

    3. profile image44
      Karen Singletonposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I told my son when he was 5 that he was too old for the toys he had and said I think we need to give them to someone that really could use them.  He went into his room and started putting toys that he didn't play with anymore in a box and then came and gave it too me.  He has been doing this now for the past 5 years and he loves to help the less fortunate. 



  2. thranax profile image44
    thranaxposted 8 years ago

    Its fine to ask them, but I bet they will say no. For kids, gifts are what make the Holidays, they love Christmas for finally getting that new bike or gaming system or w\e they desire they can't just go buy any old day. I always donate something small to needy children/charities around the holidays.

    ~thranax~

  3. Jane@CM profile image58
    Jane@CMposted 8 years ago

    Yep, its okay.  We've always donated toys, but we've also always given our kids their gifts.  When they were young, I'd take them to Target and let them pick out toys for a local toy drive.

  4. Sauvignon profile image55
    Sauvignonposted 8 years ago

    Do they really understand what it means to be giving another child a gift, or are they pretty much going along with the flow cause mama said so?

  5. elayne001 profile image83
    elayne001posted 8 years ago

    Several years ago we were facing a very difficult Christmas moneywise. Nevertheless, we asked our children to find one of their toys that they could share with with another child - not a worn out raggedy one, but something they still liked. We then went as a family and gave these "presents" to a family who was worse off than we were. The children that received the toys were so excited since they literally had "nothing". Our children felt very touched when they saw how happy the other family was with our gifts. We were very fortunate when on Christmas morning some of our neighbors left a Christmas box on our porch with goodies and toys for our children. It was a beautiful learning Christmas for us.

  6. profile image0
    sneakorocksolidposted 8 years ago

    I think kids should be allowed to keep their gifts, they're only kids for a short time. Help with a project to raise money for childrens toys or have people buy a toy that can be delivered to those in need.

  7. EYEAM4ANARCHY profile image84
    EYEAM4ANARCHYposted 8 years ago

    I'd definitely lean toward having them involved in giving an additional gift to someone in need. That teaches them the value of sharing without the potential conflict of feeling like they were deprived of a gift them self.

  8. elayne001 profile image83
    elayne001posted 8 years ago

    Several years ago we were facing a very difficult Christmas moneywise. Nevertheless, we asked our children to find one of their toys that they could share with with another child - not a worn out raggedy one, but something they still liked. We then went as a family and gave these "presents" to a family who was worse off than we were. The children that received the toys were so excited since they literally had "nothing". Our children felt very touched when they saw how happy the other family was with our gifts. We were very fortunate when on Christmas morning some of our neighbors left a Christmas box on our porch with goodies and toys for our children. It was a beautiful learning Christmas for us.

  9. profile image0
    B.C. BOUTIQUEposted 8 years ago

    Personally, I would never ask my child to give up their items, but my child and I take what we have saved and always try to give something, no matter what we can scrape together, to give to a needy child..We don't have alot ourselves, but we always give to those less fortunate than we are

  10. profile image50
    Gracious Octoberposted 8 years ago

    Yes. As long as you teach what you are trying to teach and if they don't have alot just have them pick one thing and let them know to give is to recieve.

    1. profile image50
      Gracious Octoberposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      when i thnk of our chilfren having something while others have nothing it just seems a bit unbalanced so one out weighs the other. your child not having as many toys compared to children not having a roof over their heads or food to eat?

 
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