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jump to last post 1-10 of 10 discussions (31 posts)

When will Mothering be considered a respectable job on a resume?

  1. Linda Pierce profile image60
    Linda Pierceposted 3 years ago

    When will Mothering be considered a respectable job on a resume?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/11985160_f260.jpg

  2. Snøwman profile image60
    Snøwmanposted 3 years ago

    If I was a boss I would consider it a respectable job. I don't know about others.

    1. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree!

  3. SilentMagenta profile image69
    SilentMagentaposted 3 years ago

    I believe mothering just like all jobs. They require work. However, you can't use that as experience mostly because mothering is a matter of opinion. Everyone has different ideas of what a mother should behavior like. Some people feel that mothering is just birthing the child. While others believe that attending events at school, daycares and sports makes the mother. I think when we are able to come to common ground to what exactly it takes to be a mother then we could use them as pass experience. Also, their is no way to call your supervisor or manager to inquire if you did the job correctly. You can use reference but I don't know a person alive that would call a mother unfit to her face.

    1. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Perhaps references could stand for a whole lot in the hiring of Mothers just like in other jobs. Teachers, doctors, friends...strong recommendations are worth a lot in every facet of life.

    2. SilentMagenta profile image69
      SilentMagentaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      True but I still say to get a anyone the be bold enough to insult a mother on her mothering skills is brave.

  4. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    My guess is being a mother will never be (widely) accepted as a significant or "unique qualifier" when comparing resumes with someone who has actual experience in the chosen field/occupation or a degree in a particular discipline.
    Landing a good job has become (extremely competitive) these past few years and illustrating "job transference skills" is a tough sell.
    Just because someone managed a household budget for 10 years doesn't mean a company will hire them as their next controller. Becoming a mother is still considered easier than becoming a CPA.

    1. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      In many cases, Mothers have to handle the family budget along with so many other responsibilities.
      Perhaps some day they'll consider parenting skills and classes worthy of
      a degree.
      Maybe then it will be considered great job experience.

    2. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Linda, mothers have been on the planet since the birth of mankind. If it hasn't received that type of respect in the career/business world it's unlikely to ever be valued very high in corporate America.

  5. chaitanyasaivb profile image77
    chaitanyasaivbposted 3 years ago

    I don't think Mothering is a job. Because, It is a responsibility, to be taken by every mother, to grow their children in a right way. So, If it was not a job. How can any one add it as job in resume? But, It was one of the important tasks, for any women, who wants to make their marriage life successful.

    1. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have a hard time with being told it is "too cutesy" to list Motherhood on a resume. I agree with you that it's work that we choose how we want to handle, however, being out of the work force outside of the home makes it a lot trickier to get back.

    2. chaitanyasaivb profile image77
      chaitanyasaivbposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Some times, it will be the hardest task, a women could do ever. So, I can agree with your words on how they handles it.

  6. Linda Pierce profile image60
    Linda Pierceposted 3 years ago

    Mothering will continue to receive more respect as a real job, in my opinion, as more and more men experience "stay-at-home" parenting.

    1. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      For dashingscorpio: Men are now involved moreso in child rearing in America than ever. To me, that's a huge change in how Motherhood may be respected. Men have led in the working world for generations and generations. Times have changed.

    2. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Linda I agree many men are more active in raising their children but few if any would suggest they be hired for a job because their fathering skills.

    3. Rae-LeighDawn profile image60
      Rae-LeighDawnposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It is the most respectable job to do in my opinion as well Linda. The most rewarding as well. - God pays better than any company ever could wink

  7. Besarien profile image85
    Besarienposted 3 years ago

    When mothers rule the world, mothering will get more respect. When I am hiring for my business, time off with child or caring for an elder do not count as holes in a resume regardless of the gender of the applicant.

  8. Robert the Bruce profile image61
    Robert the Bruceposted 3 years ago

    I think it will come down to who is conducting the interview. If the interviewer has spent time as a stay-at-home parent or is close friends with some of them, she may be more likely to seriously consider "Mothering" on the resume. But if the interviewer has no experience at motherhood and little desire to begin a family, then Mothering may appear to her as just a way to "fluff up" the resume.

    In the end, the interviewer will in theory be looking for the candidate that can best fulfill the responsibilities of the job and unless "Mothering" includes some specifics, then it may just be passed over.

    1. Robert the Bruce profile image61
      Robert the Bruceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for selecting my answer, Linda.

  9. Rae-LeighDawn profile image60
    Rae-LeighDawnposted 3 years ago

    lol When will life be. I was a stay at home mom who went back to work. I was worried about that but I got the job I was applying for..so I guess they didn't mind too much haha

    1. Rae-LeighDawn profile image60
      Rae-LeighDawnposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      36

    2. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Really, I think that finding work following being out of the "workforce" depends  on the individual. It's the resume part that is more my issue. And, sincere congratulations on getting your job outside of the home!

    3. Rae-LeighDawn profile image60
      Rae-LeighDawnposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I don't have it anymore and am in the same boat again. Except this time my sons are older. I worked some nights doing retail, to put something on my resume.Then I found Reiki. Hard to make a living at times but I love what I am doing.

    4. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It's really something to me how tricky it has become to get work by sending in apps and resumes without having prior connections. It leaves many of us scrambling to find whatever we can.

    5. Rae-LeighDawn profile image60
      Rae-LeighDawnposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have a strong faith, and believe everything happens for a reason.So, I see it like, I am where I am supposed to be.

    6. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      And we are definitely on the same page!

  10. Patrick McCormack profile image60
    Patrick McCormackposted 3 years ago

    Never mothering is not a job it is a responsibility a woman gains by having a baby. It will never be able to be listed as a job in my opinion, but anyone who is a parent will know how much work it really is. I think it would be better to list mothering on a resume as a skill rather than a job. It is definitely a skill that will be a major asset in a setting such as daycare and education. You never know if the interviewer is a parent as well, and as a fellow parent he/she may gain more respect for you knowing your a fellow parent. I would include mothering in any resume as a skill because it could help you get your foot in the door.

    1. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Some women opt not to accept the responsibility of being a mother. Are they still viewed as skilled in mothering when they put the title of "Mother" on their resume? The skills of mothering, in my opinion, go beyond the act of having a baby.

    2. Patrick McCormack profile image60
      Patrick McCormackposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      No because I don't believe they should put it on their resume in the first place. If you don't accept responsibility for your child I doubt your going to have custody for long and without accepting responsibility they will never develop skills.

    3. Linda Pierce profile image60
      Linda Pierceposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Sadly, some mothers still have custody of their children and aren't treating them responsibly. They could still include "Motherhood" as a skill on a resume and not be questioned or if they were, character witnesses for mothering would get tricky.

    4. Patrick McCormack profile image60
      Patrick McCormackposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly why it's likely that employers won't except it on a resume. It would be very hard verify the credentials.

 
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