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Can cooking wine/sherry catch on fire?

  1. profile image0
    Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago

    Okay. That's my dumb question. 
    Anyone know?

    1. Hotplate profile image61
      Hotplateposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It shouldn't.  For it to burn it needs to be over 50 proof (25%) on the very low end.

      1. profile image0
        Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Even in a covered baking pan?
        This sherry is only 17% alcohol...

        1. Hotplate profile image61
          Hotplateposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          You should be fine with that, although I would use regular drinking sherry.  Cooking wines and sherry all have a lot more salt in them than their drinking counterparts.  They started doing that to keep the workers from drinking on the job.  Personally, I only cook with wines that i drink.

          1. profile image0
            Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            I don't drink any.  All I have is cooking sherry.  Using it in a pinch to baste some ribs since I'm out of bbq sauce, and rather snowed-in at my house.  I'm a total amateur when it comes to chef-like experience, and do thank you all for the replies!

            1. Jeff Berndt profile image87
              Jeff Berndtposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              First of all, no it's not a dumb question.

              Second of all, no, cooking sherry by itself won't catch fire. It doesnt' have a high enough alcohol percentage.

              But! If you put the sherry in with something that's being cooked in oil (like olive oil, say) and the sherry starts to boil off (which it will, immediately!) the oil will splatter all over creation, and the splattering drops of oil can ignite.

              1. profile image0
                Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                Thanks!
                So far, it's doing good; and smells good.

  2. psycheskinner profile image79
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    Given that you can 'flambe' with sherry, I suspect it would burn if it was a high proof sherry.  I don't know if cooking sherry is any different from drinking sherry though.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Oh dear.
      Now I'm worried again...

  3. psycheskinner profile image79
    psycheskinnerposted 6 years ago

    Overall I would file it under 'probably not'.  I googled and only some of the very sweet sherries have a high enough proof.

    1. Jeff Berndt profile image87
      Jeff Berndtposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Wait wait...psycheskinner, you've flambeed with cooking sherry? What brand do you use?

      I've always used brandy to flambee stuff.

  4. Hotplate profile image61
    Hotplateposted 6 years ago

    Don't worry, 17% is going to boil before it burns.  If it makes you feel better, baking soda will put out just about any fire you can start (cooking, grease, electrical, wood etc.)

  5. profile image0
    Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago

    Thanks!
    Going to locate that box of baking soda right now.....

  6. Ron Montgomery profile image61
    Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago

    Are any of you chefs?  All wines will flame if heated to the boiling point.  It won't happen the way you are using it Brenda, but if you heat it rapidly on an open burner gas stove top, you can tilt the pan toward the flame and it will ignite.  I do this all the time, not for any culinary reason, but it scares the crap out of my wife.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      LOL you bad boy!  I'd smack my hubby if he did that.
      Hey, I actually thought of asking you a while ago about this, but was afraid you'd like the idea of my ribs catchin' on fire, so I refrained. LOL

      And isn't that "carp" instead of crap?  wink

      Just kiddin'.  Thanks Ron!

      1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        No, she literally poops her pants.

  7. Ron Montgomery profile image61
    Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago

    Cola is also a great marinade ingredient for ribs and chops.  The sugar and vanilla add a great flavor; the citric acid works to tenderize the pork.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I'll try that next time.  Thanks for the tip!

 
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