Does stuffing get cooked before stuffing it in the turkey?

Jump to Last Post 1-7 of 7 discussions (20 posts)
  1. peeples profile image93
    peeplesposted 2 years ago

    Does stuffing get cooked before stuffing it in the turkey?

    So it's my first Thanksgiving cooking the turkey. Does the stuffing get cooked before stuffing it in the turkey, or do I just get it moist with the butter and onions before putting it in?

  2. Just Ask Susan profile image89
    Just Ask Susanposted 2 years ago

    No the stuffing (uncooked) goes into the bird right before you put it into the oven.
    http://hubpages.com/food/Turkey-Stuffin … king-Times

    1. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for the link!

  3. fpherj48 profile image76
    fpherj48posted 2 years ago

    peeples......Thanksgiving dinner is my specialty!  You lucky girl!  LOL.  Hey, SUSAN!  Hi, how are you...long time no see!  You can tell peeples about my gravy!  LOL   
    "Just Ask Susan" is an excellent cook.....she probably has a couple of recipes you can check out!
    Yes, the stuffing goes in uncooked.....and after you've stuffed the bird to maximum, if you have stuffing left over, you can bake that in a casserole.
    I have an EXCELLENT stuffing recipe if you are interested, perfect gravy too!  You have my email.  My DIL is cooking this year so I'm free to stand by and help you out!!......Good luck!   "Happy Thanksgiving to all!!"

    1. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Paula. Send me the recipe!! I'm so worried I am going to screw this up!

    2. fpherj48 profile image76
      fpherj48posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Everyone I know has their own interesting tale about "their first Thanksgiving Dinner escapades!!"  Relax....it always turns out well.  I'll send you my stuffing & gravy recipe!  (Hint: buy some "bottled gravy" for back-up, just in case!!) Prepar

  4. Kylyssa profile image95
    Kylyssaposted 2 years ago

    The stuffing goes in uncooked and cooks with the turkey, absorbing the turkey's juices. Just don't forget to count it in your turkey's weight for cooking times and make sure it reaches 165 degrees inside just like the turkey meat must.

    Just stab your meat thermometer into the center of the body cavity to check the temperature of the stuffing after checking the thick part of the thigh and the center of a breast for doneness. Don't touch bone with the thermometer for the reading or it will throw off the reading as bone heats up quicker than the meat.

    1. fpherj48 profile image76
      fpherj48posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Kyly..great tips! by the time poor peeples gets advice from 12 or 14 of us, she may decide to do hot dogs on the grill!!  LOL.  "First" Thanksgiving dinners can be the BIG challenge!!  She'll be a wreck~!  LOL

    2. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks! I actually had to buy a better meat thermometer for this. Mine was short and not able to get to center of the thick part. I didn't think about adding it to weight though! Thank you!

  5. Bill Yovino profile image90
    Bill Yovinoposted 2 years ago

    Do yourself (and your guests a favor).  Don't stuff the turkey.  Cook it separately. Stuffing a turkey can lead to a build up of bacteria. A lot of people still do it, but that's no longer recommended by food experts. It's not worth the risk.

    1. fpherj48 profile image76
      fpherj48posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      bill...I am aware of this info.  However, for 50 yrs, my mother (world's best cook) knew that to avoid any risk, the stuffing must be allowed to cool completely before stuffing the bird. All expert chef's agree w/ this. I've followed Mom's advice.

    2. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I've heard this. The easy solution though is to simply make sure it heats up to the same temp recommended for the turkey to kill that bacteria. Stuffing doesn't taste as good on cooked on the side. Thanks though!

    3. fpherj48 profile image76
      fpherj48posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly!  You can always tell if the stuffing has been IN or OUT of the bird!  LOL

    4. bravewarrior profile image93
      bravewarriorposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I'm 58 years old and haven't gotten sick from bird-stuffed stuffing (have eaten that way all my life). I prefer the moisture the turkey gives it over the dry-baked stuff. I make enough to stuff and bake separately so my guests have a choice.

    5. Bill Yovino profile image90
      Bill Yovinoposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Most experts say don't stuff the turkey. There is no reason to do it and it brings an unnecessary risk that no one needs. Additionally it interferes with getting the turkey to the proper temperature. Do what you want, but know the risks.

  6. bravewarrior profile image93
    bravewarriorposted 2 years ago

    No. Well, actually if you make it from scratch as I do, you cook the ingredients then add your bread crumbs. Put the mixture into the bird once you've added the bread. Any leftover stuffing that won't fit can be baked at 350 degrees in an oven-proof dish. Follow the recipe directions for timing.

    If you're using the box stuff I'm afraid I can't help you. I have no experience with it.

    1. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Not using the boxed kind. If I am doing it I want to do it right. Thanks so much. Now I just have to figure out which things to cook first! Fun times!

  7. Linnea Lewis profile image88
    Linnea Lewisposted 2 years ago

    Yes and no. You can do both and it depends on your preferences and how much flavor you want. You can stuff it uncooked and let it cook with the turkey and absorb all of the turkey's juices and flavor, but you need to be careful about making sure it is cooked and you don't overcook the turkey and dry it out while trying to get your stuffing right. Watch the turkey and keep some broth on hand in case you need it.

    Cooking the stuffing beforehand gets rid of that anxiety but probably won't be as tasty or juicy.

    1. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Linnea. I am a bit worried about overcooking the Turkey to get the stuffing right. Hopefully I will figure it on in time!

    2. Linnea Lewis profile image88
      Linnea Lewisposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Don't worry too much smile I went to cooking school and here is a rule I was taught: make sure your thermometer reads at 165 degrees Farhenheit for about 10 seconds. This applies to all fowl and pretty much any food in contact with it.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)