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jump to last post 1-10 of 10 discussions (25 posts)

Pumpkin Pie

  1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
    Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years ago

    I LOVE pumpkin pie and I usually use canned pumpkin.  A friend of mine swears that you can't tell the difference between canned or fresh pumpkin when you taste it. What is your opinion?

    1. Dave Mathews profile image60
      Dave Mathewsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Pumpkin is pumpkin, it is the spices you use in addition to the pumpkin to make the pie, although with canned, there is also preservatives.

      1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
        Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Dave Mathews, I hadn't considered the preservatives that are part of the canning process.  So to avoid that you would have to stick with fresh.

        1. Dave Mathews profile image60
          Dave Mathewsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Tracy Most definitely fresh is best. Check out my Hub recipe for pumpkin pie if you wish to learn how to do it. It is simple and straight forward and tastes ten times better than anything you could buy.

          1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
            Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Dave, I will check out your hub, thank you!

            1. Cardisa profile image92
              Cardisaposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              I have to agree with Dave, fresh is best. Have you tried making your pie with coconut milk or cream instead of the regular?

              1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
                Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                Cardisa,

                I have not tried either of these but they sound like the secret to an even more delicious pie.

                1. Cardisa profile image92
                  Cardisaposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                  I make mine with coconut milk, lots of cinnamon and ground cloves to add some spice.

                  I use a whole wheat cracker crust. You grind the crackers in the food processor then you mix with sugar and add your melted butter and pat into pie pan.

                  1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
                    Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

                    I will have to try the coconut milk and the whole wheat crackers, these sound like great ideas!

  2. paradigmsearch profile image92
    paradigmsearchposted 6 years ago

    Your post has brought back pleasant memories. Thanks. smile

    1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
      Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Paradigmsearch, you're welcome! Will you be having some this Fall season?

      1. paradigmsearch profile image92
        paradigmsearchposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I will now. smile

  3. manlypoetryman profile image75
    manlypoetrymanposted 6 years ago

    http://www.sirenmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/pumpkin-pie.jpg

    The difference is the "COOK". I've tasted canned pumpkin pie that was out of this world...and fresh pumpkin pie that is out of this world...it is all up to the one doing the baking!

    1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
      Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That photo is so good I think it will cost me some calories. I hadn't thought of baker making the difference.  What is interesting to me is that when it comes to cooking 'fresh' is always best but this may be an exception.

  4. Aficionada profile image86
    Aficionadaposted 6 years ago

    I just published a Hub of pumpkin recipes.  (No pies, though.) While I was doing some research about it, I learned a little bit more about the various varieties of pumpkin.  The common one around Halloween (jack-o'-lantern) is sometimes thought to be blander and more watery (in cooking) than the canned varieties.  It helps to drain the cooked pumpkin, if you use your own.  Personally, I like to experiment - sometimes I cook my own, sometimes I use canned.

    1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
      Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That is interesting! I hadn't thought of there being different varieties.

  5. tonymead60 profile image93
    tonymead60posted 6 years ago

    i made some this year and found it very bland. I added several spices to it and still it said nothing. The remainder ended up in an Indian style curry, and that did it. So next time we ave pumpkin it will be in a curry

    1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
      Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Tonymead60, funny! I hope the curry was good.

  6. ActiviaUK profile image56
    ActiviaUKposted 6 years ago

    Tracy what's your recipe? I've never had pumpkin pie before, but there is a first time for everything! It's good to have recipes for foods that are in season ....yes fresh is always best!

    1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
      Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      ActivaUK,

      I have to admit that I use the recipe on the pumpkin can label. I have had great luck with this and other label recipes. 

      Here is the recipe:

      3/4 cup sugar (I substitute honey as I don't use sugar)
      1/2 tsp salt
      1 tsp. cinnamon
      1/2 tsp ginger
      1/4 ground cloves
      2 large eggs
      15 oz pumpkin
      12 oz evaporated milk
      9 inch pie shell

      Mix the first 5 ingredients in small bowl. Beat eggs in large bowl, stir in pumpkin, spice mixture, gradually stir in milk and pour into pie crust. Bake in preheated 425 oven for 15 minutes then reduce temp to 350 for 40-50 min until knife inserted near center comes out clean.  Cool on wire rack for 2 hours, serve or refrigerate.

      (If you want to substitute honey and the recipe calls for sugar just use half.  If the recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar use 1/2 cup honey)

      I agree with you about eating food that is in season. I am lucky to be able to pick local fruit in summer such as blueberries and peaches and then apples come fall.  Do pumpkins even grow in your area?  I would love to know if you try the recipe and what you think of it.

  7. Stacie L profile image89
    Stacie Lposted 6 years ago

    so ,do you like the pumpkin pie warm or cold/
    i prefer a little warm.

    1. Tracy Lynn Conway profile image94
      Tracy Lynn Conwayposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Stacie L.,
      I hadn't even considered this. I can't say I have a preference really, I think I love the pie so much that warm or chilled are both good for me.

  8. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 6 years ago

    Pumpkin pie is gross no matter how you make it

  9. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 6 years ago

    I like it both ways but agree that fresh pumpkin is better. It has a firmer texture and deeper color.

  10. ActiviaUK profile image56
    ActiviaUKposted 6 years ago

    Thank you for the recipe Tracy, I look forward to trying it. Of course Pumpkin's can grow in my area...with a little care and love. Re. Summer berry picking, I love it. Always have since I was young, even if more do end up in my belly then in the basket! Fat free natural Activia yogurt is the best accompaniment to a bowl of any fruit ;-).
    I will be sure to keep you updated on my pie experimenting.

 
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