Is it time to put the children's play doll, Barbie, to rest?

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  1. threekeys profile image74
    threekeysposted 5 months ago

    The marketers behind the Barbie doll say Barbie shows young children who they can be, who they can aspire to be. I just learnt that Barbie is putting being a spy and someone whose profession it is to arrest someone on the same level as a astronaut.I dont know if that is a move from politicians behind the scene but I am sure everyday decent people dont aspire to take up those professions. Or do they?  What are your thoughts?

    1. dashingscorpio profile image86
      dashingscorpioposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      Barbie has always sent mixed messages to children.
      On the one hand she could be viewed as being independent, has her own career, home, convertible car, wardrobe, and a handsome boyfriend.
      Having arrived in 1959 she could be considered the first feminist doll.

      However the other message received is she personifies what "beauty" is.
      More people have been concerned about the "body image' of Barbie.
      Little girls start to believe they have to look like her to have what she has. However most girls don't look like her and will never look like her.
      Some people fear such imagery causes young girls to feel inadequate.
      They want Barbie to come in different shades and sizes.

      Barbie's careers are designed to show that women can take on a variety of roles in life, and the doll has been sold with a wide range of titles including Miss Astronaut Barbie (1965), Doctor Barbie (1988), and Nascar Barbie (1998). In other words (women) can be anything they want.
      Astronauts and people who spy on behalf of their country are decent too.
      I suspect with Barbie they're having her break through the "glass ceiling". Maybe one day they'll have president or prime minister Barbie.

      Ruth Handler is credited with the creation of the doll using a German doll called Bild Lilli as her inspiration. Mattel has sold over a billion Barbie dolls, making it the company’s largest and most profitable line. Although there have been some declines in sales over the past few years it's highly unlikely Mattel would drop such an iconic property along with all the accessories sold with the Barbie name and image.

      As it is with most things having to deal with children (parents) are the biggest influence in their lives. A child who is more influenced by dolls, magazine covers, and peers probably has not had their parents stress their self worth enough. 

      Barbie was one of the first dolls given to little girls who was not an infant nor required them to nurture her, feed her, or push her around in a stroller.
      Instead the "fun" aspect of Barbie was dressing her up in the latest fashions and decorating her playhouse. Little girls imagined themselves being single adult women with careers and going out on dates.

      "That Girl' is an American sitcom that ran on ABC from 1966 to 1971 in many ways personifies the "Barbie" lifestyle. That Girl was one of the first sitcoms to focus on a single woman who was not a domestic or living with her parents. The decision to leave the couple engaged at the end of the run was largely the idea of  Marlo Thomas. She did not want to send a message to young women that marriage was the ultimate goal for them.

      If there was no Barbie I'm certain little girls would find female images to compare themselves to or aspire to be like other than themselves.
      Sadly most of us don't reach the point of not caring what "others" think about us until we're in our mid 30s, 40s, or beyond.

      Maybe it's human nature not to be "satisfied" with who (we) are!
      In fact those with high self-confidence are often called narcissistic.
      People who seem to be without insecurities are also called arrogant.
      Nothing pleases some people more than discovering their idols are flawed too. In the U.S. photos of actresses caught without makeup, exposed cellulite, spider veins or not looking their "best" are hot properties.

      I don't know what we can do to teach children to embrace their individuality and stop comparing themselves to others.

      As I stated earlier maybe it's human nature (not to be happy) with who we are and what we have.

  2. Breelyn Sirk profile image65
    Breelyn Sirkposted 5 months ago

    Absolutely not. My daughter just received a paleontologist Barbie and she loves it. My little girl loves digging for rocks and that sort of thing. They make Barbies that are full figured, petite barbies (like me) and much more now. I do not think politicians have anything to do with it. Frankly any brand that is out there encouraging girls to become a profession that is dominated by men is going to help empower them and help all future women.

  3. threekeys profile image74
    threekeysposted 5 months ago

    A holistic response dashingscorpio. Its made think and rethink. I value that. Cheers

 
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