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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (6 posts)

Is There A Relationship Between Gum Disease And Cardiovascular Disease?

  1. ngureco profile image82
    ngurecoposted 8 years ago

    Is There A Relationship Between Gum Disease And Cardiovascular Disease?

  2. rmcrayne profile image97
    rmcrayneposted 8 years ago

    As recently as 2 weeks ago, I heard someone from the dental profession discussing this relationship on the Today Show on NBC.  The “expert” was suggesting good dental hygiene to prevent heart disease.  Multiple times I have heard this issue discussed, suggesting a causal relation between plaques on the teeth and in the arteries, and that good dental health will prevent heart disease.

    It makes my head want to spin around. Doesn't it make much more sense that the same thing that causes one may cause the other?!  And that the plaques, on the teeth and in the arteries are clues or symptoms so to speak of what the real marker is. There is no logic to Western Medicine logic.  Find yourself an Alternative Medicine health professional.

  3. profile image57
    saragrlandposted 8 years ago

    Whilst you can have peridontal disease and cardiovascular disease independantly, research has shown that people with peridontal disease are twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease than those without.

    The theories for the correlation are rather ropey - but I suspect it has more to do with social circumstances, knowledge and approach to health and well-being in those that present with peridontal disease rather than anything else

  4. Laura Thykeson profile image70
    Laura Thykesonposted 8 years ago

    Most definitely. Many studies have confirmed this. You can check it out by doing a search on the web about it, and in my own case, I have a lot of tooth problems, and have heart disease as well. Same is true for my father. Could be diet related, not really sure of the exact link, but there has been a link proven. Hope this helps! (By the way, I agree totally with rmcrayne! We are way behind here...)

  5. Skyraider profile image53
    Skyraiderposted 8 years ago

    There's very little doubt that periodontal disease and several forms of heart disease have a causal relationship.

    Infection anywhere in the body elicts  certain "acute phase reactants", which need not be so "acute" in chronic disease, but might be sustained at abnormally high levels. Certain of these acute phase reactants promote groth of the muscular lining of the heart vessles into the lumen...channel..., creating a substrate for obstruction of blood flow. In addtion, other reactants contribute to the formation of plaque - arteriosclerosis - in the lumen of the vessel.

    The most notorious relationship between poor dentition and the heart is endocarditis. Under normal circumstances, one's system is flooded by mouth pathogens on brushing the teeth. When there is a chronic infection in the mouth, such as periodontitis, the bulk and nature of these pathogens increases, and they may be released spontaneously or by manipulation of the teeth, to settle on...and erode...a heart valve. Conversely, a malformed or damaged heart valve invites organisms to establish themselves upon it...again causing acute endocarditis. Nortoriously difficult to treat medically, and prone to cause valve obstruction or insufficiency as the disease progresses, endocarditis often leads to replacement of the native valve by a prothetic one. BUT...priot to valve replacement...in either scenario... diseased dentition must be corrected. In advanced periodontal disease, this usually results in the extraction of all teeth, and the placing of dentures.

  6. seamist profile image57
    seamistposted 7 years ago

    Yes, there is a relationship between gum disease and cardiovascular disease. Unbelievably, it's estimated there are 100 million bacteria for every milimeter of saliva and 600 different kinds. While some bacteria are good, others are silent killers. Unfortunately, when you have gum disease, bacteria can enter the bloodstream and do system-wide damge to your body. Not only has bacteria been linked to cardiovascular disease, it has also been linked to different kinds of cancers, diabetes, preterm births, stillborn births, and much more. Consequently, it is very important to brush and floss at least twice a day to keep gum disease at bay.

 
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