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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (9 posts)

What is your perception of Physical Therapy?

  1. Matt Stark profile image78
    Matt Starkposted 6 years ago

    What is your perception of Physical Therapy?

    What is it that you think Physical Therapists do?  What has been your experience with Physical Therapy?  Would PT be your first choice for back pain?  Why or why not?

  2. Larry Fields profile image79
    Larry Fieldsposted 6 years ago

    A good physical therapist is worth his weight in gold! I suffered a shoulder injury in high school athletics many years ago. The exercise that the PT gave me prevented further problems down the road.

    Many years later, I was referred to a second PT, because of a lower back problem. She seemed to be in a hurry, and did not give adequate instructions for the exercises that I was supposed to be doing.

    Personal trainers are a different ball of wax. A good personal trainer can help you with various physical problems, including certain types of back pain. And he can show you the correct forms for various strength-training exercises, in order to minimize the risks of injury. However personal trainers are not as well-educated as the physical therapists, and are more apt to pass on misinformation.

  3. profile image0
    Stephanie Moultonposted 6 years ago

    I am absolutely in favor of PT, and do it almost every day for my lower back.  Not only does it help me avoid daily pain, it helps alleviate any flare-ups I might have and help my back heal more quickly.

    PT wasn't my first choice for back pain, but after several years of avoiding it, I found that I better give it a shot.  I'm SO glad I did.

  4. cmlindblom profile image77
    cmlindblomposted 6 years ago

    I have a few buddies who are on physical therapy from explosions and gunshot wounds and they say It's easier and worth more for them to just work it out on there own. I think they are good to get a base of work outs and a little understanding on your injury and how to work with it.

  5. Matt Stark profile image78
    Matt Starkposted 6 years ago

    Is the perception that PT's only provide exercise?

  6. edhan profile image59
    edhanposted 6 years ago

    I always believe in self therapy first.

    It is also good to have a second opinion in therapy. I have seen PT and it should be okay as they are considered experience in this field.

    As for me, I like to do self therapy healing as my first choice since our bodies have healing power. I will use my body Qi energy to heal.

  7. supplies expert profile image60
    supplies expertposted 6 years ago

    To answer Matt's other question he asked in the answers field, "Is the perception that PT's only provide exercise?"

    I believe that Physical therapists are really focused on exercising. Whether it be stretching exercises or light lifting exercises or just small repetitive movements. From what I know of Physical therapists, I don't believe they're able to prescribe anything or perform surgeries so I don't think they could do anything besides exercises. Don't get me wrong though they do a lot of diagnosis when you come in and determine the best exercises which is a talent in its own. I have a small tear in my rotators cuff and damaged all the other tendons in my shoulder, I've slowly been recovering to full health through PT and it's helped a lot. My other friend has had a total of 6 knee surgeries, 3 on each knee, 4 ACL tears, 1 PCL and 1 MCL ... so he's lived in and out of PT offices but yet he's still actively playing sports, obviously against the will of the PT.

    But yeah, PT is worth it, it's costly, but once you get the exercises down I'd just continue to do them on your own. Then go back every 6 months for a little while to see if there are new stretches and exercises you should be doing instead to grow.

  8. tsmog profile image82
    tsmogposted 6 years ago

    Big-Q my perception of physical therapy as a profession is it assists traditional medicine with the healing process of physical injury. It is a restorative process mainly focused on muscles.

    Q-1 I think they enhance the healing process of injury and restore the 'memory' of the muscle system involved.

    Q-2 Back injury. Electro-stimulation (not sure what it is called) and exercise

    Q-3 No,  my first choice for back pain is my chiropractor

    Q-3 I have a great relationship with my chiropractor and the results have never had a negative outcome. However, this is a personal view based on my experience.

    Opinion. I think physical therapy comes down to the therapist, not necessarily its practiced art of healing. Sadly, like much of traditional medicine today it has become commercialized or part of the 'medical' industry. I have trust in that system knowing the limitations of it within the legal parameters & bureaucracy.

  9. whoisbid profile image73
    whoisbidposted 6 years ago

    My best experiences have been with expert chinese acupuncture doctors. After the chinese doctor has fixed the nerves then it is possible to do sports again or even PT if you want. I am not saying this will be true for everyone but it is my experience .

 
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