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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (11 posts)

Have you ever saved someone's life? Explain how you felt.

  1. krsharp05 profile image92
    krsharp05posted 5 years ago

    Have you ever saved someone's life? Explain how you felt.

  2. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image80
    Pavlo Badovskyyposted 5 years ago

    Believe it or not, I did. It was in a period of perestroyka in the USSR. Criminal gangs and racket were almost normal. I was driving a car between two cities and noticed a big lorry in the dead end of the road. It was near a forest. There was nothing special about it and I just  passed by but noticed that several man in masks concealing faces were dragging a driver out of the lorry. I had just a glimpse of it becasue I drove pretty fast but was so much shocked!! After that just a mile away I saw a police car and reported it. A day later I came to know from TV news that this was a lorry loaded with cigaretts and Police came just in time  to save a driver from death. Several weeks later police announced in a local newspaper that they are looking for a person who reported the crime. I went to police and they told me that criminals planned it beforehand. THey traced the lorry since it left the gate of a factory, they knew how much load it has and they put some nails on the road to flat his tyres. Actually he stopped to change a tyre. Criminals planned to kill a driver and to get a lorry with expensive stuff.

    I felt that I was lucky to be in a proper time in a proper place. I was also lucky to see a police car. (there were no mobiles that time) For a short period of time I was toooooooo much proud of myself, but it has gone pretty fast smile I did not see the driver and even do not know his name. Probably he had the most horrible minutes in his life.

    1. krsharp05 profile image92
      krsharp05posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It sounds a lot like a James Bond moment and you should feel proud.  It's one of those times that luckily for him, you were in the right place at the right time.

  3. BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image83
    BLACKANDGOLDJACKposted 5 years ago

    A few years ago I was driving home late at night. I had just gone through a small town in a rural area. It was late October, which is when a lot of deer get hit by cars where I live. I saw something big lying in the road in my lane. I hit the brakes and managed to stop before I hit it, but it blended in with the road and was very difficult to see as you approached. So I slowly drove around it, thinking initially it was a deer. But I soon realized it was a person. I pulled over and got out with my flashlight. The guy appeared to be drunk and apparently had passed out. There happened to be a cemetery right next to where we were so I dragged him over to the grass and called the state police. Two police cars came within 10 minutes and so did an ambulance. The EMTs checked him over and said he appeared to be okay so he didn't go in the ambulance. The police put him in one of their cars and said he was going to spend the night in jail for public drunkenness. What I felt was relief. I was relieved first of all that I didn't run over the guy and kill him, and of course that nobody else did either.

    1. krsharp05 profile image92
      krsharp05posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Wow, you could have easily run him over in the dark of the night.  Thank goodness that you were aware of him there and that you realized it was a human body - not a deer.

  4. chef-de-jour profile image98
    chef-de-jourposted 5 years ago

    Roughly thirty years ago I was on my way to a friend's house one hot summer's afternoon and decided to go the scenic way, along the old canal that flows through my hometown. This canal has brick sides at certain points - near the locks that allow the barges to pass through - and as I approached an old stone bridge to cross the water I noticed out of the corner of my eye a young girl of about 9 or 10 fishing for 'tiddlers' with a hand net. She must have been a 100 yards ahead. I also made a mental note of a couple the other side of the lock. They were looking into the water. I didn't take much notice to be honest, I was walking pretty fast enjoying the day.

    When I got to where the girl should have been I happened to see her hair floating on the green surface - I can see it now - a circle of blonde hair. And her net was floating on the surface. I dived in - she was only about 6-8 feet away - swam behind her, lifted her up by her shoulders and somehow got her onto the canal side. It all happened so quickly.
    Her parents - the couple - eventually came dashing over when they heard me calling and saw their girl flat out, drenched and bedraggled. The mum understandably was distraught and hysterical.
    Luckily there was no need for CPR. The girl just coughed and wretched and cried like crazy - and that was basically it.

    I stayed for a few minutes but the girl seemed fine- apart from shock. The parents were quietly thankful - I don't think they'd ever leave their daughter alone again next to a steep sided 8 ft deep canal. We all agreed she should go to the hospital A&E straightaway.

    Would the girl have drowned? I'm not sure. Perhaps the parents would've returned within a minute, perhaps not. I only know that I was wet through when I got to my friend's house. The whole short episode still seems a bit like a dream.

    1. krsharp05 profile image92
      krsharp05posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank goodness you were there for the girl.  Perhaps that's why you were there in the first place.  You undoubtedly saved her life because you could have just as easily walked by without ever even noticing the girl.

  5. geetbhim profile image60
    geetbhimposted 5 years ago

    I saved my little sister from drowning in the water tank. Even I was small at that time only 10 year old and my sister was 4 year old. She was playing there and the underground water tank was left open as cleaning work was going,she was jumping and fell over there, i was shocked without knowing i bend over the hole and started screaming give your hand give your hand.........
    she was rolling inside she was not in her control, I could catch her leg and souting for help, as some passer by came and took out my sister,the whole experience is like seeing a dream I saved my sister and got scolding from parent that why we were playing there when the work is going on there.

    1. krsharp05 profile image92
      krsharp05posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It must have seemed as though it was happening in slow motion when you look back on it now.  Like you said, "a dream". Even though you were scolded, it's a good thing you were there for her.

  6. IDONO profile image83
    IDONOposted 5 years ago

    You know what is really neat about this question? It can make everyone, for a second, feel good about themselves. At some point in life, maybe more than once, all of us have said or done something that saved somebody's life. We just don't know it. A heroic save, such as pulling someone from a burning car or something, is truly a miracle. But just being a good example or saying one thing right, can change the collision course that someone is on. Telling someone that doesn't know it's not safe to play golf during a thunderstorm can save their life. We have opportunities to save others lives everyday. We just don't look at it like that. Sometimes, the greatest stories aren't always in the headlines. You can jump in the ocean or jump in a kiddie pool. The splash is the same.

    1. krsharp05 profile image92
      krsharp05posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I smile at your answer because you make an excellent point. Sometimes you make a mark and you don't even know it.  Love your comparison between the ocean and kiddie pool.

 
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