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cadmium and health

  1. NIKADE profile image37
    NIKADEposted 9 years ago

    Pollutant cadmium in water may arise from industrial discharges amd mining wastes,cadmium is widely used in metal plating, chemically,cadmium is very similar to zinc and these two metals frequently undergo geochemical processes together both metals are found in water in the +2 oxidation state.
        The effects of acute cadmium poisoning in humans are very serious among them are high blood pressure, kidney damage, destruction of testicular tissues, and destruction of red blood cells. It is believed that much of the physiological action of cadmium arises from its chemical similarity to zinc. Specifically, cadmium may replace zinc in some enzymes, thereby altering the stereostructure of the enzyme and impairing its catalytic activity. Disease symptoms ultimately result.

  2. Karen Ellis profile image59
    Karen Ellisposted 9 years ago

    Nicade or anyone else,

    What is the cure for cadmium poisoning?  Or is there any?  Perhaps a natural cure?

    Karen Ellis

    1. NIKADE profile image37
      NIKADEposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      The treatment of acute cadmium poisoning should be directed
                  initially towards decontamination (removal of the patient from
                  further exposure, or the induction of vomiting).

                  In cases of inhalation, respiratory symptoms should be
                  carefully monitored and pulmonary oedema treated.

                  In cases of ingestion, ipecac/lavage/catharsis should be used
                  in the usual manner (Ellenhorn & Barceloux, 1988).

                  Antidotal treatment remains controversial.

                  For patients with external dust contamination, health care
                  providers should protect themselves from airborne dust during
                  decontamination of the patient.           

                  In case of poisoning by inhalation of cadmium fumes or dust,
                  the patient should be rapidly moved to fresh air protecting
                  health care workers from secondary exposure from dust.

                  If cadmium-containing substances are ingested, the mouth should
                  be washed out with water. If vomiting is not prominent, use
                  ipecac, gastric lavage or catharsis in the usual manner. Oral
                  activated charcoal is not useful (Friberg & Elinder, 1983;
                  Lenga, 1988; Ellenhorn & Barceloux, 1988)

                  In the case of skin exposure, the affected area should be
                  flooded with water for at least 15 min (Lenga, 1988).

                  Eye contamination should be managed by continuous irrigation of
                  the eye with clean water for at least 15 minutes (Lenga, 1988).
                 Acute poisoning

                     

           
                        15-25 mg EDTA/kg (0.08-0.125 ml of 20%
                        solution/kg body weight) in 250-500 ml of 5% dextrose
                        intravenously over a 1 - 2-hour period twice daily. The
                        maximum dose should not exceed 50 mg/kg/day. The drug
                        should be given in 5 day courses with an interval of at
                        least 2 days between courses. During subsequent courses
                        urinalysis should be done daily and the dosage reduced if
                        any unusual urinary findings occur.

                   

                        Cotter (1958) reported the case of three men exposed to
                        cadmium fumes who were subsequently treated with calcium
                        disodium EDTA, at a dose of 0.5 g every 2 hours for 1 or
                        2 weeks. At the end of the treatment period the patients
                        were either asymptomatic or had made a significant
                        recovery, as indicated by a reduction in blood urea
                        nitrogen, blood cadmium and urinary cadmium
                        concentrations.

                        Recent studies in rodents have shown that, for acute oral
                        cadmium intoxication, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid
                        given orally (Basinger et al., 1988; Andersen & Nielsen,
                        1988; Andersen, 1989) or calcium disodium
                        diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) given parenterally
                        (Andersen, 1989) are the most effective antidotes,
                        provided that treatment is started very soon after
                        cadmium ingestion.

    2. NIKADE profile image37
      NIKADEposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      The treatment of acute cadmium poisoning should be directed
                  initially towards decontamination (removal of the patient from
                  further exposure, or the induction of vomiting).

                  In cases of inhalation, respiratory symptoms should be
                  carefully monitored and pulmonary oedema treated.

                  In cases of ingestion, ipecac/lavage/catharsis should be used
                  in the usual manner (Ellenhorn & Barceloux, 1988).

                  Antidotal treatment remains controversial.

                  For patients with external dust contamination, health care
                  providers should protect themselves from airborne dust during
                  decontamination of the patient.           

                  In case of poisoning by inhalation of cadmium fumes or dust,
                  the patient should be rapidly moved to fresh air protecting
                  health care workers from secondary exposure from dust.

                  If cadmium-containing substances are ingested, the mouth should
                  be washed out with water. If vomiting is not prominent, use
                  ipecac, gastric lavage or catharsis in the usual manner. Oral
                  activated charcoal is not useful (Friberg & Elinder, 1983;
                  Lenga, 1988; Ellenhorn & Barceloux, 1988)

                  In the case of skin exposure, the affected area should be
                  flooded with water for at least 15 min (Lenga, 1988).

                  Eye contamination should be managed by continuous irrigation of
                  the eye with clean water for at least 15 minutes (Lenga, 1988).
                 Acute poisoning

                     

           
                        15-25 mg EDTA/kg (0.08-0.125 ml of 20%
                        solution/kg body weight) in 250-500 ml of 5% dextrose
                        intravenously over a 1 - 2-hour period twice daily. The
                        maximum dose should not exceed 50 mg/kg/day. The drug
                        should be given in 5 day courses with an interval of at
                        least 2 days between courses. During subsequent courses
                        urinalysis should be done daily and the dosage reduced if
                        any unusual urinary findings occur.

                   

                        Cotter (1958) reported the case of three men exposed to
                        cadmium fumes who were subsequently treated with calcium
                        disodium EDTA, at a dose of 0.5 g every 2 hours for 1 or
                        2 weeks. At the end of the treatment period the patients
                        were either asymptomatic or had made a significant
                        recovery, as indicated by a reduction in blood urea
                        nitrogen, blood cadmium and urinary cadmium
                        concentrations.

                        Recent studies in rodents have shown that, for acute oral
                        cadmium intoxication, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid
                        given orally (Basinger et al., 1988; Andersen & Nielsen,
                        1988; Andersen, 1989) or calcium disodium
                        diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) given parenterally
                        (Andersen, 1989) are the most effective antidotes,
                        provided that treatment is started very soon after
                        cadmium ingestion.

  3. Karen Ellis profile image59
    Karen Ellisposted 9 years ago

    Nicade or anyone else,

    What is the cure for cadmium poisoning?  Or is there any?  Perhaps a natural cure?

    Karen Ellis

 
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