This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

FDA Admits That Acetaminophen Is One Of The Most Dangerous Drugs

  1. profile image0
    Deborah Sextonposted 7 years ago

    acetaminophen is an analgesic drug used to treat headaches, arthritis, and reduce fever, People have used it to replace  aspirin when they developed stomach problems. It is also known as Tylenol

    So far this year, there have been 26,000 emergency room visits due to Acetaminophen. And 450 deaths.

    Acetaminophen causes damage to the liver more often than alcohol abuse.
    It is the number one cause of Kidney Cancer. It also causes people to age and causes cavities from the inside of teeth.

    It is added to prescription pain medication to boost it's effect. They are the Hydrochloride pills known as Opioids:  Hydrocodone, Vicodin, Norco, Oxycodone, Roxicodone,  Percocet, Oxycontin.
    There is also Darvocet which is Acetaminophen and propoxyphene.

    The FDA has been allowing the Acetaminophen Company make Billions of dollars while the people are developing diseases and even dying. The FDA would prosecute any other company.

    Acetaminophen can even be bought over the counter.
    The FDA plans to reduce the level that is mixed in a pill.

  2. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 7 years ago

    The FDA is no better than the actual government. Both are corrupt.

  3. Daniel Carter profile image76
    Daniel Carterposted 7 years ago

    Deborah, I hope you will expand this info out and post it as a hub.

    It's interesting to me that the pharma companies only use the words "manage", never the word "cure." They also only produce synthetic substances to "manage symptoms." Notice that addressing and curing the root of disease is not in the vocabulary. It is in the vocabulary of non-pharma research work.

    I'm not an advocate of pharmaceuticals except for in life-threatening, short-term use. Long-term use of pharmaceuticals always yields a host of horrible problems which will usually kill one quicker than the disease they are designed to manage.

    It's also interesting to note that now that Tylenol is generic, people have the erroneous belief they can live on it for every little ache and pain. Most unfortunate.

  4. Cagsil profile image60
    Cagsilposted 7 years ago

    Hey Daniel,

    There is a reason why you never hear them say "cure" or don't have it in their words...because there is no money to be made in curing things, just treating the symptoms. wink

  5. profile image0
    Deborah Sextonposted 7 years ago

    Both of you are right. The FDA is only going to reduce it?
    Reduce the effect, and allow the companies to make the SAME money.

    No legal action is being taken on the FDA nor the companies for the disease and deaths they've caused.

    Thousands that didn't go to the hospital or die (yet) called the poison control hot line.

  6. westdrug profile image56
    westdrugposted 7 years ago

    450 deaths in a year due to a drug proves that acetaminophen is as good as poison. And the FDA's reluctance to act is not helping either. God help us!

    Btwn, you can also check out some of my hubs on contemporary medical issues like these.

    Regards,
    Phil.

  7. Mezo profile image70
    Mezoposted 7 years ago

    wait a minute....what is your source please? paracedtamol the most common cause of liver cancer??

    acetaminophen is toxic in large doses only not in the therapeutic dose

  8. lrohner profile image80
    lrohnerposted 7 years ago

    Like Mezo said--acetaminophen is toxic in large doses or under certain conditions (heavy drinkers, people with AIDS, etc.), and those conditions are noted on the warnings that come with the product that people are supposed to read.

    If you read a bit closer into the FDA study that came up with the 458 number, roughly 358 of those deaths were intentional--deaths from people who were out to commit suicide.

    (And btw, all of the numbers I saw in every study were "estimated" instances where acetaminophen was "implicated.")

 
working