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How many trick or treaters come to your house?

  1. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 5 years ago

    I've heard that in some subdivisions and apartment buildings, people can expect to get as many as 500 kids looking for candy.
    I'm glad I moved to the countryside and only expect a few as parents drive them from house to house.
    My small town has a Trunk or treat event for two hours on main street.
    big_smile

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not that many really, not where I live now. Perhaps about five. Same here though, their parents bring them so it's all finished by about 8.30pm.

    2. StephanieBCrosby profile image87
      StephanieBCrosbyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I do not feel so bad now. The first year in our house we were so excited to be in a good town that we bought a ton of candy, even though we live on a dead end street off of a main highway. We got no trick-or-treaters. But in the last two years we went from one kid to three. So this year we are hoping for five. Our street is slowly turning over to younger families.

  2. Gordon Hamilton profile image96
    Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years ago

    I have found that Halloween is a dying concept in the UK and rapidly so. I remember that when I was a child, it was huge. Parties were associated with every aspect of life and I know that dozens of children would go round the doors. These past few years, living in various parts of the UK - from Edinburgh to London and more - I have never so much as seen kids going out dressed up. It's virtually a non-event.

    1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
      Hollie Thomasposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There are still kids here that do, and, I know when my kids were younger I always had the pleasure of the door to door business. I think now though, they appear to celebrate Halloween in different ways, kids discos and such.

      1. Gordon Hamilton profile image96
        Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Maybe that, Hollie. Greater choice in modern days? What I have noticed in recent years, however, is that the promotion of fireworks for Guy Fawkes Night takes more and more space in supermarkets, that would once have been shared with Halloween items. Greater profit for supermarkets...? My local supermarket has all but stopped selling food to make way for its fireworks displays this past week or so... (OK - slight exaggeration! smile )

        1. Hollie Thomas profile image60
          Hollie Thomasposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          You know, you and wilderness have highlighted something here. Years ago, (not that many when I think of my own kids) you'd carve out a pumpkin, light a couple of candles and take the kids around to the neighbors houses. They'd get a bit of candy, maybe a couple of coins. But, just like every other celebration, it gets ravished by commercialism. The face paints, candy, costumes etc. It kind of takes the fun out of it, and I think most people not only can't afford it, but have gotten wise to it. I think the same will happen with bonfire night eventually. It's gone from a fire in the back yard, a few toffee apples, a couple of sparklers and a baked potato, to the most expensive firework display that people can buy.

  3. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 5 years ago

    Although we are urban, we live in a cul-de-sac at the end of a 1 block street off the main subdivision, and have been the only home to give candy.  As a result we only get a handful and I miss that.  I always have fun seeing the little ones come to the door "Tic oh teet"ing. 

    We've gotten new neighbors this year - maybe we'll get a few more.

  4. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 5 years ago

    Kids today have Halloween parties in school and churches. The towns have local parties;maybe its a sign of the times.
    Adults spend more on costumes and having aprties it seems..

 
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