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What are some good names for the male protagonist in a work of fiction?

  1. Jeff Gamble profile image74
    Jeff Gambleposted 5 years ago

    What are some good names for the male protagonist in a work of fiction?

    What are some good names for the male protagonist in a work of fiction? Bob, Jim, John, Jack - no offense to the Bobs, Jims, Johns and Jacks of the world, but all boring. How about something different?

  2. neildabb profile image74
    neildabbposted 5 years ago

    Try Sam or Cal.  Why make it harder than it has to be?  If the simple name fits, use it.

    I posted a hub on this very topic.

    http://neildabb.hubpages.com/hub/Choosinganame

    That said I've made up much more complex names in some of my stories where the character needed the more complex name.

  3. profile image0
    KDuBarry03posted 5 years ago

    The way i view it is this: names portray character the second you look at it. Also, there is something linguistic  about names that give the mind a certain vibe about it. Take this name: Brona (From The Shannara Series). If you sound the name "Bro" has a low tone and "na" holds that deep tone. Adding to this, different names also have different cultural reasoning. For example, "Keith" means wood or lumber.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct= … 0-9V14sM7w

    That is a really good site for names and their meanings. I would check it out.

  4. wingedcentaur profile image84
    wingedcentaurposted 5 years ago

    Hi Jeff Gamble!

    Here's my list.

    1. Maximillian (not Max!)
    2. Navram (I just made up the name 'Navram')
    3. Crocker
    4. Laramie
    5. Bradden
    6. Alfonso (not Al!)
    7. Bruggio (Does that sound vaguely Italian? I hope so; I made it up)
    8. Darius
    9. Renard
    10. Vinton (not 'Winston' -- Vinton)

  5. Jeff Gamble profile image74
    Jeff Gambleposted 5 years ago

    wingedcentaur - I think Maximillian and Renard were Bond villian names, which by default makes them great - Thanks for the list!

    neildabb - Great Hub, thanks for the info and suggestion about the genealogies

    KDuBarry - That's a good site to have bookmarked, thanks, very helpful

  6. AM Hanson profile image77
    AM Hansonposted 5 years ago

    In defense of John and Jack, there is a very good reason they are commonly used names.  Jack is a diminuative form of John, and John is the name given to an unidentified person (i.e. John Doe).  The more simple the name, the easier it is for the reader to connect initially.  The people who get the cool or wierd names are usually those who are seen as being big, important, or exotic.  Authority figures that play prominent roles or villians get big, fancy names unless they are being portrayed as a faceless/everyday person.

    1. Jeff Gamble profile image74
      Jeff Gambleposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good point AM - keep it simple for the good guy, which helps the reader connect with the character

 
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