jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (4 posts)

Is the novel Fifty Shades of Grey a backward step for feminism?

  1. annaglomesh profile image60
    annaglomeshposted 5 years ago

    Is the novel Fifty Shades of Grey a backward step for feminism?

  2. M. T. Dremer profile image94
    M. T. Dremerposted 5 years ago

    I haven't read fifty shades of grey, but from what I know about it; it isn't any different from all the romance novels already out there. Some readers enjoy that genre, and there is nothing wrong with it. The only difference with this book is that it reached the mainstream eye. But no, I don't think it's a step backward for feminism. Books like this have always existed and always will.

    1. annaglomesh profile image60
      annaglomeshposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Was wondering as I have read quite a few articles in the press by women slamming it for glorifying abuse and saying it is one of the most horrendous books....and poorly written..etc..few friends my age in their forties couldn't even finish it...

  3. Alisa Arishina profile image70
    Alisa Arishinaposted 5 years ago

    Strangely... no. I don't think it is. Is it empowering for women? Hardly.

    EL James's characters in Fifty Shades of Grey were originally based on Bella and Edward from Twilight. I didn't know that when I started reading the book, but when I did find out, it explained a lot. As Twilight was a less than empowering for young women (boy leaves girl, girl tries out different semi-suicidal scenarious to draw his attention), 50 Shades of Grey doesn't inspire much girl power either. Unlike 50 Shades of Grey, the Twilight saga was much better written, however.

    Is Fifty Shades of Grey a backward step for people actually interested in experimenting with their sexuality and wanting to know what it's like to play with the darker side of sexual nature? I don't know. But I do know that there are better books on the subject.

 
working