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What words do we use in the United States that are spelled differently from word

  1. cabmgmnt profile image87
    cabmgmntposted 4 years ago

    What words do we use in the United States that are spelled differently from words used in the UK?

    Besides spelling differences, are there words that we use differently or have a different context compared to words here in the States?

  2. billybuc profile image88
    billybucposted 4 years ago

    There are a ton of them, but now that you have asked the question I'm having a hard time thinking of them....oh, I know...words that end in "or" for us, many in the UK end in "our"....I'll probably see twenty later today when I'm not thinking about this question. LOL

  3. annart profile image87
    annartposted 4 years ago

    Center instead of centre and probably many more in that pattern.
    Practice is the same for both noun & verb in the US, whereas in Britain we use practice for the noun (We need plenty of practice.) and practise for the verb (It's necessary to practise every day.)
    Like billy, I know there are loads more but they won't come to mind at the moment. There are quite a few words that can be embarrassing because they mean different things but, again, I can't think of any off the top of my head so I'm off to find some!

    1. annart profile image87
      annartposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      There are also loads of '-ise' words in English that are spelt '-ize' in the US, such as 'recognise'.

  4. JayeWisdom profile image93
    JayeWisdomposted 4 years ago

    There are many words spelled differently between American English and British English. Bill mentioned the "or" and "our" words. There are many American words ending in "ize" that are spelled "ise" in the UK.

    As for words with different meanings between the two countries, here are a few:

    In the UK, it's a "boot"; in the US, it's a "car trunk."
    A "boot" is worn on the foot in the US; in the UK, it's a "wellie."
    A minor injury in the UK may call for "plasters"; "bandages" in the US.
    "Dear" refers to expensive in the UK; it's a term of endearment in the US.
    A UK newborn sleeps in a "cot"; the US baby sleeps in a "crib."
    A "diary" is an appointment book in the UK, but a personal journal in the US.
    UK:  chemist/US:  pharmacist
    UK:  Give us a "cuddle."  US:  Give me a "hug."

    These are only a few of many differences between British English and American English.  One of the major differences (to me) is that when a billion pounds is referenced in the UK, it means a million million, while a billion US dollars equals a thousand million.  BIG difference! Of course, one British pound sterling is currently worth $1.52 in US dollars--another big difference....

    Jaye

    1. annart profile image87
      annartposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      'dear' is also a term of endearment in the UK.    Just thought of another one - 'bonnet' of a car in the UK and 'hood' in the US (which is actually another article of headwear to us in the UK!).  How complicated it gets!

  5. Twilight Lawns profile image83
    Twilight Lawnsposted 4 years ago

    I Spell Checked (US version) a story I have written and came up with these US spellings and UK alternatives:
    US                 UK
    aplogized         apologised
    armory         armoury
    artifacts         artefacts
    bejeweled         bejewelled
    color                colour
    dexterous        dextrous
    disheveled   dishevelled
    endeavors   endeavours
    favored       favoured
    gamboling   gambolling
    harmonize   harmonise
    humor       humour
    jeweled       jewelled
    labored       laboured
    marveled       marvelled
    marveling       marvelling
    meager       meagre
    mesmerizing            mesmerising
    misdmeneanors    misdemeanours
    misjudgment            misjudgement
    neighbor                    neighbour
    practiced (Verb)    practised (Verb)
    pulverized            pulverised
    raveled                    ravelled
    realization            realisation
    realized                    realised
    realizing                    realising
    recognizing            recognising
    reveled                     revelled
    savor                     savour
    savored                    savoured
    somberly                    sombrely
    spiraled                    spiralled
    splendor                    splendour
    tasseled                    tasselled
    Traveler                   Traveller
    vapor                   vapour
    woolen                    woollen

    and of course,
    center                       centre
    theater                      theatre

    I hope these are of some help.

    1. cabmgmnt profile image87
      cabmgmntposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      These definitely help. The question came to mind when I noticed that jewelry was being spelled as jewellery in a Hub. I noticed that the writer was from the UK and it got me thinking....what else is different?

    2. annart profile image87
      annartposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      In fact 'jewellery' can be 'jewelry' or jewlry' in the UK, depending on choice but also on the era in which it was written.  Very interesting, our language!  It's my passion and it was my job.

 
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