Is there a word unwelcomed?

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  1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
    Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years ago

    Is there a word unwelcomed?

    When some one come to the door and you don't want to see them, should the word be you are "not welcomed " or "unwelcomed"

  2. profile image0
    Colin323posted 3 years ago

    The unwelcomed refers to your general feeling about that person as a visitor to your door; the not welcomed relates to your particular response when they do call !  There's a story here, Elsie!

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Colin, I'm writing a article for hubpages but wasn't sure which was right. By your answer, I think I will use not welcomed, Appreciate your quick reply.

    2. alancaster149 profile image84
      alancaster149posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      There is a possible scenario for 'unwelcomed': "Where other guests had been greeted and made welcome, there was one visitor as yet unwelcomed. He had been effectively ignored".

  3. peachpurple profile image82
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    i usually see "Salesmen not welcome" on the glass door, never unwelcome

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes I have seen that also in that situation. Still thinking of using "not welcomed".

  4. alancaster149 profile image84
    alancaster149posted 3 years ago

    'Unwelcomed' doesn't apply anywhere.
    You can be 'unwelcome', as someone whose presence or company is not wanted or desired. 'Unwelcome' also applies to a comment uncalled for.
    'Not welcome' applies to a forewarning to undesired visitors or to comments that might be made. Once you have been welcomed you can't be 'unwelcomed', although you can be thrown out if you make yourself unwelcome.
    (Refer: 'unwelcome', Oxford concise English Dictionary - the same will probably apply to Websters).

    1. Marie Flint profile image91
      Marie Flintposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      That's quite an explanation, Alan! (Loving it.)

    2. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you Marie, good explanation and very helpful.

    3. alancaster149 profile image84
      alancaster149posted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Of course there is the outside chance of someone who's arrived at a venue/party, who has escaped the host's attention and has as such been 'unwelcomed', although by and large we'd say 'not yet met and greeted'.

  5. profile image56
    DannoManposted 3 years ago

    What you are attempting to do is turn an adjective into a verb. Not that this has never been done, but it is unwise in this case. Unwelcome is what someone is or was. "Unwelcomed" would imply that someone who at some point was welcome, somehow lost that characteristic.

    The notices we see in store fronts saying, "salesmen not welcome," could be worded "salesmen unwelcome" without changing the meaning at all. Salesmen who [are] not welcome are definitely unwelcome. But if you try to turn that last adjective into a verb it doesn't work out so well. First, there is a problem with the tense. If it were actually a verb, unwelcomed would clearly be past tense, so you would be describing something that has already occurred (and may no longer be the case). And then there is the confusion factor. Since there is already a good way to say that you don't want someone around (or--past tense--didn't want them around), this new word serves to confuse the reader. "Is there some meaning here that I don't understand? Is this the same or different from saying 'not welcome?'"

    The exceptional authority on language, Bryan Garner (Garner's Modern American Usage) would probably call this a needless variant.

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Well that was an extensive answer, but it sure confused me not sure what I should use, but most likely stay with "not welcomed".

  6. Twilight Lawns profile image80
    Twilight Lawnsposted 3 years ago

    There definitely is a word "unwelcomed". It is an adjective, but having said that, I don't think I would have used it.  It is somewhat clumsy. "He was not wlecomed" would be a nice way of getting around it.
    Yet "An unwelcomed bout of 'flu' (influenza) created a poor situation in the work force" scans better than “A not welcomed bout of 'flu' (influenza) created a poor situation in the work force"
    Ah! The English Language. What mazes and labyrinths it drags us down.

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You answered my question, there definitely is a word "Unwelcomed"
      I must probably will not use it. This question has given me food for thought. Thanks.

    2. profile image56
      DannoManposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      "It was an unwelcome bout of flu," would still be better than putting it in the past tense with "unwelcomed." What dictionary do you find this "word" in, please?

      I can tack on an 'ed' onto just about anything and call it a word if I have a mind to.

    3. Twilight Lawns profile image80
      Twilight Lawnsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Try the following, DannoMan:http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/unwelcomed
      And we weren't talking about tacking an ed onto words, were we?

    4. profile image56
      DannoManposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Don't be unfriendlied. I was pointing out that this was my view of the word:  one that had arbitrarily been assaulted by an 'ed' that looked entirely foreign and …um, unwelcomed. …making it look entirely uninterestinged and unpalatabled.

  7. Marie Flint profile image91
    Marie Flintposted 3 years ago

    I guess I can best answer with examples:

    an unwelcomed guest
    You are not welcomed at my house!

    Both are used, and both work.

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes i'm getting very confused. I'm writing an article about being welcomed or not. eg "visiting new neighbours" the difference between being welcomed or not welcomed. Like having the door slammed in your face when you knock on the door.

  8. old albion profile image71
    old albionposted 17 months ago

    Hi Elsie. I would think the words should read; not welcome.

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      I agree you are right, now two years later I can see it clearly.
      Thanks for stopping by.

  9. Glenis Rix profile image100
    Glenis Rixposted 17 months ago

    I just obtained a door sticker from my local Council which reads "We do not answer the door to uninvited callers". Something similar would resolve your dilemma

  10. jodigirl88 profile image80
    jodigirl88posted 15 months ago

    I'm pretty sure it is "unwelcome" without the d. No such word as unwelcomed. I looked it up in a thesaurus also.  unwanted, undesirable etc.. hope that helps.

  11. escole61 profile image59
    escole61posted 11 months ago

    I think I might tell the person that they are being 'intrusive' or, if less direct, say 'it's inconvenient.' 'Not welcome' or 'unwelcome' would not be the first words that spring to mind if I was trying to say it to someone, face to face.

    1. Elsie Hagley profile image71
      Elsie Hagleyposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the reply, interesting, you have a nice polite way of saying it.
      Have a great weekend.

 
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