Bengali Poetic Songs ~ Part 2 by Rosina Khan

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  1. Brenda Arledge profile image83
    Brenda Arledgeposted 15 months ago

    Don't miss this wonderful piece written by Rosina Khan discussing a National Poet of Bangladesh & some songs.

    I'm certain this will interest everyone.

    I've only glanced over this one, because my morning is proving to be quite hectic.

    Please read & comment on her work.

    This is what Rosina says about this piece:
    This piece is in continuation of the article, "Playing the Harmonium." In the new article, I give backgrounds of the popular Bengali Poets and talk about the parts of some more songs composed by them. Read on.

    https://hubpages.com/literature/Bengali … ngs-Part-2

    1. ChitrangadaSharan profile image92
      ChitrangadaSharanposted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Hello Rosina!
      Thank you for sharing this beautiful tribute to two of the most renowned poets of our times. Both Rabindra Sangeet and Nazrul Sangeet are outstanding. I love music, and I love their compositions.
      It was a pleasure to watch your videos. I had read your earlier article too.
      Thank you for sharing this wonderful post.
      Thank you Brenda, for highlighting this in the forum

      1. surovi99 profile image84
        surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

        I am delighted, Chitrangada, that you enjoyed the article, along with the videos. I am glad you like listening to both the Sangeets, loving music and their compositions. I highly appreciate your comments.

        1. surovi99 profile image84
          surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, Chitranagada, both the Sangeets are remarkable, and I like playing some of them on my harmonium from time to time.

  2. Brenda Arledge profile image83
    Brenda Arledgeposted 15 months ago

    Rosina
    I went ahead and posted this one. 
    I will finish reading it when I have time.

    It looks very interesting.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Thank you so much, Brenda for posting my article. Yes, finish reading it when you have time. Thank you again for finding the article interesting.

  3. Peggy W profile image97
    Peggy Wposted 15 months ago

    Thanks Rosina for introducing me to a form of music of which I am unfamiliar.  Playing and singing to the harmonium would be fun.  I used to strum a few chords on a guitar and sing to it.  Thanks Brenda for sharing her work with us.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      I am delighted Peggy that you consider playing and singing to a harmonium to be fun. It is fun indeed. I am happy to know you played the guitar before and sang to it. Your comments are very much appreciated.

  4. Farah N Huq profile image83
    Farah N Huqposted 15 months ago

    Playing guitar and flute have been on my wish list forever. I can play harmonica though but still an amateur. It was good to see you singing with the harmonium and I am glad you chose a topic to state about our renowned poets...However, I do not think that mood makes much of a difference in their selection. I think both of them have their own pool of fans and followers who would choose their favourite poet’s songs or poems by default in any mood or state. A good read!

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      I am glad, Farah, you enjoyed the article. Happy to know you can play some of harmonica. Some follow only Nazrul Sangeet while some others follow Rabindra Sangeet but there are also followers listening to both the Sangeets.Thank you for your comments. Much appreciated.

  5. Farah N Huq profile image83
    Farah N Huqposted 15 months ago

    Oh yes, that would be me! Lol I do love both their work and also Lalon. Specially some of the renditions. Here’s one of ‘em.
    A hard rock version https://youtu.be/g6Y6kKwkhcY

  6. Farah N Huq profile image83
    Farah N Huqposted 15 months ago

    Sharing a bit from an article to explain what it means...

    “Written by extraordinaire Lalon Fakir in the classic, magical era of the late 1700s.

    The unknown bird in the cage, how it flies in and out.
    The narrator uses personification to depict the throbbing, enchanted soul as a bird that goes in and out of a cage made of bones, ribs and flesh of the human body. The soul that in not encaged like the other parts of a human’s physicality but a free, unconfined and untied anatomy.

    If I could leash it with my mind’s chain, I would never let it go, yet how does it go in and out.

    Here, the narrator talks about if he could capture the soul with a leash he would never let it go for spiritual voyages and he would keep it intact to his body, forever and always, to protect it from all kinds of emotional pain and heartbreaks.”

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      I love the sentiments and thoughts of Lalon Fakir. Comparing the bird going in and out of the cage to his own soul and how he would leash it to keep it inside his body make it sound all awesome. Really I am intrigued by his imaginations and pondering. Thank you for sharing, Farah.

  7. Pamela99 profile image90
    Pamela99posted 15 months ago

    This is a very interesting article Rosina. This is new music foe me and the words are lovely. I had not heard of this talented man before, so I learned something new. Thank you for sharing this information.

    Thanks for posting Rosina's article Brenda.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Pamela, for liking the article. I am glad you enjoyed the new music and consider the words of the songs to be lovely. Truly appreciate your comments.

  8. Farah N Huq profile image83
    Farah N Huqposted 15 months ago

    We do have some great poets and songwriters, dear Pamela, but since most of their work never get translated they don’t get popular in other parts of the world. Surovi has spoken about two of the most renowned Bengali poets Kazi Nazrul Islam and Rabindranath Tagore...and Lalon Shah, whose song “khachar bhotor ochin pakhi” I have shared is another one.

    The International mother language day which is observed on 21st February originates from our country, Bangladesh.
    Here is a Wikipedia link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna … nguage_Day

    So people here take pride in doing their work in their native language.

    Sorry, Surovi, for flooding your thread with all this extra information that I couldn’t stop myself from sharing.
    Blessings for you.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      It's completely okay. This is a discussion forum and so, Farah, you are not breaking any rule.

      I noticed Pamela referred to one talented man/poet although I have talked about two great poets of our country. I just thought I would overlook it.

      And thank you for sharing all the lovely information referring to our country.

  9. Farah N Huq profile image83
    Farah N Huqposted 15 months ago

    I guess that’s my fault. I talked about all three of them at the same time and that might have sounded confusing. Anyway, I am glad that Pamela liked the song lyrics. Most of Lalon songs have very deep meaning. Translation wouldn’t do justice to them. Thank you, Surovi, for bringing up the topic and thank you, Brenda, for sharing this article. Blessings to you all. Now I am playing the above Lalon song on a repeat lol.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Blessings to you too, Farah!

  10. Jodah profile image91
    Jodahposted 15 months ago

    Hi Rosina, I had missed the first article about the harmonium, but I read it now before this one. I had heard of these poets before and liked the words of the songs you included. The videos you shared of yourself playing the harmonium and singing were impressive. Well done.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      I am delighted, John, that you read my first article, "Playing the Harmonium" before moving on to read the current one about, "Bengali Poetic Songs Part-2."

      I love the fact that you have heard about the poets earlier and you liked the lyrics of their songs. I am also happy to know you liked my playing the harmonium and singing.

      Thank you, John, for supporting my works and appreciating them. You made my day. All the best to you and have a great day.

  11. Ankita B profile image86
    Ankita Bposted 15 months ago

    This is a great and informative article, Rosina. I am familiar with both the poets and I learned Rabindra Sangeet as well during my music classes. The video you shared was really melodious and I loved the reading the translations. I read your previous article too. Thank you for sharing them.

    1. surovi99 profile image84
      surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Ankita, for your lovely comments. I am glad to know you learned Rabinra Sangeet during your music classes. I am happy to know you enjoyed the article including the video. Thanks for reading my previous article. Gratitude for that. All in all, much appreciated.

      1. surovi99 profile image84
        surovi99posted 15 months agoin reply to this

        Ankita I am glad you loved the translations and thought the video to be melodious. Thanks a ton.

 
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