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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (10 posts)

Sad Dramatic Poetry

  1. Frank Atanacio profile image82
    Frank Atanacioposted 7 years ago

    Hey everyone these are two sad pieces of dramatic poems which one is far more dramatic and sad?


               
                Sorrow Came In Droves


            The angels were shocked,
            the spirits would glow,
            right before them was an elaborate show,
            on one counter,
            small broken teeth on a silver tray,
            and a little girlâ��s bloodied clothes,
            laid out carefully in a graphic display,
            the angels with horrified looks,
            stared at the other table,
            that had the girlâ��s book bag and school books,
            sorrow came in droves,
            as ghosts were hovering
            over the dead girlâ��s clothes.




                A Great Divine


            On the outside you could hear the pouring rain,
            then it came to a complete halt,
            as the steamy air rose
            in damp waves from the asphalt,
            society in general,
            must be totally insane,
            there was little else to explain,
            the detective staring, eyes glaring,
            nostrils flaring,
            at the semi-nude body
            of an elderly woman,
            a twisted sheet wrapped her head,
            rigored in bed,
            with no apparent trauma,
            socks half off her feet,
            a window left opened,
            and a stray pubic hair on the sheet,
            it’s a tragedy that blows the mind,
            and rape-murder was a clear sign,
            that we desperately need intervention
            from a great divine.

    1. Mrs. J. B. profile image59
      Mrs. J. B.posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      The second poem is the more dramatic one.. Both poems I must say were beautiful.

    2. blackreign2012 profile image67
      blackreign2012posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      the second... I actually liked both though

  2. Uriel profile image75
    Urielposted 7 years ago

    to me the first poem sounds more dramatic, though the poem is short with respect to the second one. I believe the first sinks into the heart more.We can identify with both victims in the poems but i feel the first seems more appealing sad although the message delivered in the end of the second poem is a great asset smile
    Glad to have you here on hubpages big_smile ~
    uriel a fellow poet and hubber friend

  3. JJGEMINI profile image58
    JJGEMINIposted 7 years ago

    I liked them both, the second just a little more than the first.
    So... what inspired you to write about the rape/murder victims?

  4. RedElf profile image89
    RedElfposted 7 years ago

    The first poem had more shock value because the victim was a child. The repetition of "the dead girl's clothes, the dead girl's school bag, the dead girls' clothes" focused the image and evoked a strong response to the picture you painted. The second poem was far more graphic and shocking in its details.

    The first relied more on cuing our visceral response through high-emotion key-words, where the second shocked in its explicit images.

    They both evoke feelings of sadness, and would be more or less dramatic depending on which death you find more moving - that of the child or that of the old woman.

  5. duffsmom profile image61
    duffsmomposted 7 years ago

    I love the rhythm and flow of both.  Very moving.  It is amazing how a complete story can be told with so few words.  Excellent.  More dramatic?  For me both really hit me, but perhaps the first  was a little more dramatic for me--almost more so because of what wasn't said.  Great work.

  6. FaithDream profile image80
    FaithDreamposted 7 years ago

    The first poem I thought was more sad and dramatic. It described a child's tragedy with such imagery. I felt the sadness through the ache of those words.
    However both are written very well.

  7. Rafini profile image87
    Rafiniposted 7 years ago

    The second is more dramatic while the first is more sad.

  8. brightforyou profile image83
    brightforyouposted 7 years ago

    powerful and well-written. Well done!

 
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