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In a nutshell, what's your cleverest gardening tip?

  1. WiccanSage profile image94
    WiccanSageposted 3 years ago

    In a nutshell, what's your cleverest gardening tip?

    If you like to garden, in the ground or in containers, share with me a little tip or two of things you like to do.

    I container garden myself and I've found over the last couple of years that honey works better for me as a rooting hormone for plant cuttings than store-bought rooting hormone.

  2. Minnie McD profile image59
    Minnie McDposted 3 years ago

    Rubbing soap under your nails helps reduce nail staining and compost and mulch building up under your nails.

    1. WiccanSage profile image94
      WiccanSageposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Oh that's brilliant. I was just grumbling and scrubbing my nails again this morning after having my hands in the dirt.

  3. wychic profile image90
    wychicposted 3 years ago

    Oooh, I hadn't heard of honey -- does it have to be raw? I'll certainly have to try that smile.

    I use raised-bed gardens and extra-tall rows to help conserve water and ensure proper draining -- less than 15" of rain here a year, usually, but heavy clay soil. Companion planting is a huge one -- I always plan out my garden ahead of time to make sure the best companions are grouped, it's the simplest way I know to REALLY boost yields. I do all-organic and use companions for pest deterrents, and have used my own compost pile to feed it. This year, I'm trying my hand at vermicomposting to see if some good ol' worm tea helps my apple tree and berry bushes big_smile

    So...if it has to be one: Companion planting. Anyone who gardens and doesn't know what it is, you're SO missing out.

    1. WiccanSage profile image94
      WiccanSageposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Regular store-bought real honey.  Someone told me a couple yrs ago it's antifungal and antimicrobial so it protects cuttings while they root. It worked so well I did some research & found some studies suggest it facilitates rooting.

    2. wychic profile image90
      wychicposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks! I do clippings all the time, so now I'm going to try that one big_smile. I have rooting hormone, but that stuff is expensive after a while, and we always have honey around smile

  4. Lowdown0 profile image80
    Lowdown0posted 3 years ago

    Don't use chemicals like miracle grow on food, and use chicken compost and worm juice to help the garden grow rich organically.

    1. WiccanSage profile image94
      WiccanSageposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Considering I have a screen porch container garden in a condo complex I can't compost. I wish I could have chickens and compost, that'd be awesome (I buy commercial compost & usually use it for mulch & compost tea fertilizers).

    2. wychic profile image90
      wychicposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wiccan Sage -- have you looked into vermicomposting? My sister has a worm bin on her balcony in a third-floor apartment. When done right it's extremely low-odor, and the resulting castings are really rich for the plants.

    3. Miss Dickinson profile image61
      Miss Dickinsonposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      WiccanSage, although you may not have room to have chickens or compost naturally, there are several organic granular fertilizers that you can buy and make it simple for small time container gardeners to use.

  5. Eira Losee Fukuda profile image77
    Eira Losee Fukudaposted 3 years ago

    THANK you for the tip about honey - I meant to say that in the comments on your sage hub, but got distracted by other aspects I enjoyed.

    Anyway, I think my favorite thing in gardening is planting herb spiral beds, as I mentioned to you earlier. If you have limited space in your yard, or physical limitations, it's a beautiful and efficient way to conserve space and energy.

    Also, comfrey (aka 'knitbone'). Not only is it a great medicinal plant, it's a wonderful companion plant, since its deep taproot brings up nitrogen most other plants can't reach. It can also shade more delicate plants from too much sun, and the bees love it. If it gets too invasive, I just use it as nutritious mulch.

    1. WiccanSage profile image94
      WiccanSageposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Eira! Comfrey is something I have not grown, but I have worked with the herb purchased at organic herb stores. I'm going to look into it.

  6. Lady Guinevere profile image61
    Lady Guinevereposted 3 years ago

    Those children's windmills works the best to keep deer and other creatures away from eating my gardens and the netting (crenoline) that you get in the fabric stores keeps the seeds from other plants and bugs and other unwanted things from landing in your raised gardens.  Best yet is that neither are chemicals or have to be put on after it rains or mixed or kill anything.

    1. WiccanSage profile image94
      WiccanSageposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Lady! That's cool--children's windmills! I have heard that scattering human hair keeps deer away- do you  know anything about that? Deer aren't an issue for me in the city with a screen porch, lol, but I'm curious and I'm sure it'll help others.

    2. Lady Guinevere profile image61
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I tried the human hair and it doe nothing same as with the Irish Spring Soap and the mothballs...nothing.

  7. Miss Dickinson profile image61
    Miss Dickinsonposted 3 years ago

    Wood Ash! Its amazing for tomatoes and most other vegetables as well!

    Thank you for the honey rooting idea! I must try that.

  8. marcJ profile image80
    marcJposted 3 years ago

    I've written a couple hubs on this subject, there are too many to list here. Hopefully they help you all as much as they've helped me!

    http://marcj.hubpages.com/hub/Gardening … e-Recycler
    http://marcj.hubpages.com/hub/Twenty-Ti … eat-Garden

 
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