jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (12 posts)

Does anyone know why refrigerator shelves are not solid?

  1. The Examiner-1 profile image74
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    Does anyone know why refrigerator shelves are not solid?

    I wonder when something too thin falls off through the crack in the self. They bring the shelf out, stop, and then put a bit of a "fence" sticking out from it. This leaves a space and things slip through if they are too thin.

  2. sallybea profile image99
    sallybeaposted 3 years ago

    Metal shelves with holes are probably marginally more sensible especially when someone decides to put a hot pan into the fridge.
    Actually my fridge has plastic shelves which are next to useless,  They don't like hot pans and crack easily under weight.
    Cold air probably circulates better too.

    1. The Examiner-1 profile image74
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have glass shelves internally. I apologize for not being clear in the question for I meant in the door.

  3. The Examiner-1 profile image74
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    I forgot to state in the question that I meant the shelves in the door - not the internal ones. Where I wrote "...crack in the shelf" - 'crack' means 'space'.

    1. sallybea profile image99
      sallybeaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Ha, even in the UK crack means space.  Guess you could have edited this question!  I, think you can.  I can only assume that a man invented your shelves:)

    2. The Examiner-1 profile image74
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I simply wanted to make sure that any others answering understood the question since I did not write clear enough.

  4. lisavollrath profile image95
    lisavollrathposted 3 years ago

    My fridge has solid glass shelves. I suspect most refrigerators have openwork shelving so light can get through, and air can circulate.

    1. The Examiner-1 profile image74
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      So does mine. I was not clear in my question because I meant in the door. My apologies.

    2. lisavollrath profile image95
      lisavollrathposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      My fridge has solid plastic modular shelves in the door, built in one solid piece. They can be moved around with the contents safe inside. I think you just have to look before you buy your next fridge.

    3. The Examiner-1 profile image74
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Unfortunately it came with the house which is a rental. I believe that it is a moderately old fridge. The space bars slip on/off but only in one spot. I did notice that the top shelf has a smaller 'gap' than the other two.

  5. tsmog profile image83
    tsmogposted 3 years ago

    I read your clarification below. I know the fencing at the shelves on my snap out and there is a 1" or so gap. It is easier to clean for me. That doesn't really answer why they could not be solid. Expense for manufacturing? Duplication of parts for different models using the same fencing?

    I just Google 1950 fridges. They were very mixed for door storage. Many had solid fencing. In fact many the whole shelf snapped in and out with solid fencing. That leads me to think today the door inside must be injected molded as a manufacturing process and cost less. The fencing gap is a puzzle for sure.

    1. The Examiner-1 profile image74
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Tim. I will check to see whether I can snap the size of mine too. I did not know that.

Closed to reply
 
working