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jump to last post 1-10 of 10 discussions (27 posts)

Does anyone know the name of this tree/bush with the deep maroon colored leaves?

  1. Faith Reaper profile image86
    Faith Reaperposted 3 years ago

    Does anyone know the name of this tree/bush with the deep maroon colored leaves?

    I have seen this tree/bush with its deep maroon colored leaves all over my county, and I am just wondering what is the name of it.  I know I should know, and maybe it blooms later.  It just strikes me odd because of its coloring here in spring being so dark as if it were fall.  Thank you for answering.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12357168_f260.jpg

  2. Phyllis Doyle profile image95
    Phyllis Doyleposted 3 years ago

    Faith, did it first have tiny pink, very fragrant flowers before the leaves came?  If so, it could be a flowering plum tree. They do not grow very big. The one in your picture is about as big as it will get.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I am not sure, Phyllis, as it has been pouring down rain so much here, I haven't noticed a thing LOL. Now, the sun is shining today and I have noticed these all over my county.  Could very well be a plum tree. Thank you!

  3. LadyFiddler profile image75
    LadyFiddlerposted 3 years ago

    No but that tree is familiar to me we have it in the Caribbean also. My granny might know it but she isn't around now lol. I hope someone knows smile

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Jo.  I know your granny knows all about plants and such, and may know, especially if you have them down in paradise ...Caribbean : )

    2. LadyFiddler profile image75
      LadyFiddlerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      LOL yes it's really Paradise with just a few locus running around "brute beast"

    3. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      LOL, Jo.  I wish I could trade out this photo, because I got a close-up of the leaves today when I was somewhere else.  These are everywhere here; I am noticing.

  4. Jackie Lynnley profile image88
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 3 years ago

    It looks like a Japanese Maple to me. Do the leaves look like maple leaves? I have one I take beautiful pictures of every spring against the sky and it sure looks like mine. Be easier to tell with a closer look. I would bet it is though. I get a couple little sprouts from mine most springs but so far something always happens to them.
    A plum tree looks somewhat like that too and I have one of those too! The leaves would be tinier though.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I think the leaves do look like maple leaves.  I will enlarge my photo.  I wonder if I can switch it out here for a closer look?  Have never tried to change out a picture after I posted one in a question.  You have so many beautiful trees everywhere!

    2. Jackie Lynnley profile image88
      Jackie Lynnleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Sent you photo of mine; it is def Japanese Maple but there are other red maples that do look similar; I just think this is somehow prettier. If you do get one and mulch around it, look each spring for shoots. Free trees!

    3. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, Jackie. That is it! I just tried to paste my close up I had taken, but it will not paste. Yes, I am going to get one! Looks like you were the first to state Jap. Maple, so I will choose your answer as best. Tx to all who answered.

  5. firstcookbooklady profile image85
    firstcookbookladyposted 3 years ago

    If it is like ours, it is called a Burning Bush. It doesn't bloom but the leaves turn bright red later in the season. It's dark maroon for the most part.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Char, wow, Burning Bush, interesting!  Well, right now it looks deep purple or maroon is the only color that I know of what to call it.  I will watch them and see how they turn.  Thank you!

  6. Besarien profile image85
    Besarienposted 3 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12357601_f260.jpg

    Hard to tell without a close up of the leaves. Could be some type of maple if the leaves are star shaped or a red oak if more oval with lobes.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Besarien, I happened to stop at a local restaurant the other night, and there was one and the leaves looked just like that leaf on the top there to the far right you have featured here.  Thank you! I did take a photo, but not sure if I can change.

  7. Bob Bamberg profile image96
    Bob Bambergposted 3 years ago

    Looks like a Japanese Maple to me, Faith.  I had one at another house I owned and mine had a very short trunk like the one in the picture...the branches start very close to the ground.  It definitely is not a burning bush, which is indeed a bush, not a tree.  I had them at that house and have two adjacent to my deck here.  Those leaves are small and turn a vibrant red in the fall.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you so much, Bob.  I think you and Jackie just may be right on this one.  Yes, the branches do start very low to the ground.  I may try to swap out the photo so everyone can see a close up of the leaves.  They are everywhere, I am noticing now.

  8. paulburchett profile image68
    paulburchettposted 3 years ago

    It's either a Crimson King Maple, Flowering Plum or Japanese Maple., but it's hard to say without seeing it up close. If it's a Crimson Maple, it looks very young, maybe 4 or 5 years old. If it's a plum, I'd guess about 6 or 7 years, but the bark appears to be too light to be a plum. If it's a Japanese Maple, it's probably not a Laceleaf. I'm pretty sure a Japanese this size would be at least 15-20 years old.
    Just stop and knock on their door and ask what it is and please let us know

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Paul, wow, you certainly know your trees!  Yes, I could do that, but they must be popular around here for they are everywhere and that color just stands out this time of year. I will try to add a close up photo here if I am able to do so. Thanks!

    2. paulburchett profile image68
      paulburchettposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Faith! I've pruned, trimmed and removed trees off and on for over 25 years.

    3. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Really, Paul!  So, you are a tree expert.  I will wander over to your side of HP Town to see if you have written any on trees ... I know you are right about one of these trees being the one in my photo.

    4. paulburchett profile image68
      paulburchettposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I wouldn't say an expert lol, but it has been a way to make money over the years. I haven't written any Hubs on trees and probably won't. I've wrote a few Hubs from my heart to bring Glory to our Lord. Faith in Jesus and trying to do Gods will!

    5. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, Paul, for writing to His glory and His glory alone.  God bless you.  In His Love, Faith Reaper

  9. Genna East profile image87
    Genna Eastposted 3 years ago

    Hi Faith...

    I agree with other comments in that this looks like a Japanese Maple.  :-)   They are beautiful.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Genna,

      I stopped at a local restaurant the other day, and there was another tree.  I snapped a photo of it up close and the leaves do look like Maple leaves.  I appreciate you.  Blessings

  10. The Examiner-1 profile image74
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    It looks like you have an 'Emporer I' Japanese Maple. It requires afternoon shade; it is best to feed it once a year with a slow release fertilizer and to water it generously.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image86
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Keven, I think you may be right, as I saw another one the other night and snapped a close up of the leaves and they do look like maple leaves. I don't have one in my yard, but they are all around that I have been noticing.

 
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