This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is used to quickly and efficiently deliver files such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisements has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (21 posts)

What is a fair price to charge to clean someone's house or condo?

  1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
    TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years ago

    What is a fair price to charge to clean someone's house or condo?

    Just curious.  If someone has a 1500 sq foot house that has no carpet or drapes, kids, pets, etc., how much do you think a house cleaner should charge?  I have seen rates that go anywhere from a flat rate of $40 to $120 and from $15 to $25 per hour.  What think you?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12701780_f260.jpg

  2. manatita44 profile image84
    manatita44posted 2 years ago

    Where I am, some charge about £9.00/hr, roughly, $13.00 at a guess. The decent ones charge £10.00/hr, about $15.00 dollars.

    £11.00/hr is expensive in West Ealing but worth it, and the work can be quite hard, even with the best of them. So for instance, a good one may be quicker with the sinks, bath and kitchen, but there is still a fair amount of scrubbing to do.Most cleaners do about 3-4 hrs per house, so $13x3 or x4 equates to about $39.00 -52.00, all told. $120.00 is too much.

    1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I think a lot depends on where you live.  The figures I gave are for the US, and I've seen some that are totally outrageous!

  3. Austinstar profile image86
    Austinstarposted 2 years ago

    You can also look for coupons. You will see them sometimes on Amazon Local or RetailMeNot or even in your mailbox.
    I would call three or more places and get an average per hour charge, then figure out who is giving the best rate.
    You might also check your neighborhood, if possible, for a teenager than might want the work.
    Good luck!

    1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I found some forums where house cleaners post.  It seems that most of them are pushing for $25 per hour plus and are urging each other to refuse to take less, even when the job is an easier one. Some are asking $70!

    2. Austinstar profile image86
      Austinstarposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Highway robbery! But I assume many people are only too willing to pay that price.

    3. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree.  These people have no education, no training and very little overhead, yet they want to make almost four times the current minimum wage!  It's a real problem for people who need their services and cannot afford  (or want to) pay those prices

  4. Sherry Hewins profile image96
    Sherry Hewinsposted 2 years ago

    In northern California, in 1995, I charged 15 dollars per hour for housework. I had no trouble getting it.

    1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      In those days, California was booming, so I can see why people could afford to pay that amount then.  I wonder if the same would be true today.

    2. RTalloni profile image87
      RTalloniposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      For all the poor mouthing in this country, people find ways to pay for what they want.  Otherwise, ball players would not get paid 30 million dollars, give or take a million or so.

    3. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      RTalloni   I agree with you, but this does not relate to the question.  How can someone with no education, no training and often poor work experience expect people to pay  upwards of $25 per hour?  Far more than minimum wage for manual labor?

    4. Sherry Hewins profile image96
      Sherry Hewinsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It's a free market. I guess if they are charging too much, nobody will hire them. If they are getting it, that's how much they are worth. People don't have a right to cheap housekeeping. If they can't afford it, they will have to do it themselves.

    5. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree.  Nobody has a right to cheap house cleaning.  However, there are many elderly and disabled people who need but cannot afford to pay high prices.  Shouldn't there be some sort of fair standard for them ?

    6. Austinstar profile image86
      Austinstarposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I think us old folk are just goung to have to fend for ourselves. I'm trying to declutter before it gets to the point that I can't do it anymore.

    7. cat on a soapbox profile image96
      cat on a soapboxposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Having a housekeeper is still considered a luxury that many can't afford.

    8. RTalloni profile image87
      RTalloniposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Initially, the question made me think that you (or someone you know) wanted to start a business.  My first comment was about what the market will bear and if a person wants to succeed in a business like this they generally can't be shy about fees.

  5. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 2 years ago

    Hotel maids get an average of $10 per hour. Cleaning services usually send out maids in groups of 2-3 to do a house and charge by the job. The girls get paid much like hotel maids. I think the prices charged by these companies set the standard for what the market will bear. Expect to pay them $100 or more for a first time clean of a 1500 sq. ft. home. (Cleaning supplies/equip. included.) Rates will usually do down if cleaning is regularly scheduled on a weekly basis. Individuals tend to charge more because it is harder work for just one person. Here in Los Angeles, expect to pay $65 for one or $85 for 2 independents who use your own cleaning products. (They have transportation costs and get no perks or benefits.) Real value depends on the thoroughness of the job. some are worth it, others are not. Think how much YOU would charge to clean someone's home?

    1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image98
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I can understand a higher rate if several people are working, but if it just one and he or she will work for $10 pr hour as a hotel maid (or thereabouts) why would that same person expect $25?

    2. cat on a soapbox profile image96
      cat on a soapboxposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It depends on how thorough the job is. Good housekeepers work hard and deserve to be compensated whether educated or not. There are many well-paid yet inept and lazy people in the business sector who deserve less than a good housekeeper.

    3. RTalloni profile image87
      RTalloniposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      That's the real question, isn't it?  Independents also must pay various taxes and costs other than transportation, depending on their location and other factors. Federal, state, and local tax burdens placed on small businesses can be unbelievable.

    4. Sherry Hewins profile image96
      Sherry Hewinsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Cleaning a single house is a lot different than hotel work. At a hotel you can be guaranteed a certain number of hours. When you are doing private homes the hours will be limited. It's harder to put together enough jobs to make a living.

 
working