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Is cardboard for weed control in my garden a good choice?

  1. rgasperson lm profile image89
    rgasperson lmposted 20 months ago

    Is cardboard for weed control in my garden a good choice?

    When I think about cardboard on top of the garden to control weeds, I wonder if it will keep needed moisture from getting to the plants I am growing. Any help would be appreciated.

  2. lisavollrath profile image97
    lisavollrathposted 20 months ago

    Generally, you don't put the cardboard over plants you are growing. You put it around them, to keep the weeds down.

  3. The Dirt Farmer profile image95
    The Dirt Farmerposted 20 months ago

    I like to use cardboard because it breaks down within a year or two and feeds the soil. I've read not to use cardboard with lots of ink on it, as that may contaminate the soil. As Lisa says, don't put it over plants, but in the areas between, such as under mulch for walkways. Good luck to you!

  4. nochance profile image92
    nochanceposted 20 months ago

    Cardboard is a great way to control weeds in your garden and much better for your garden than weed barrier fabric. You'll want to cut holes for any plants you want to keep and layer in spots where you're worried plants might come through. Then cover with mulch to make it look pretty and you're good to go. It will retain moisture much better than a weed fabric would too.

    http://evanandkatelyn.com/2013/07/yard- … -mulching/

  5. DrMark1961 profile image99
    DrMark1961posted 20 months ago

    I am not sure how bad the bug situation is there in SC but in some areas a heavy mulch like cardboard leads to terrible insect infestations. The bugs are warm and wet so prolify and some species wil destroy your crops the next year. (Which is why carboard and newspaper mulches are not used everywhere. If mulching worked everywhere Rodale would be even more famous and we all would be doing it.)
    If your garden is large enough you might try just half with a cardboard mulch and then see how the bugs affect your garden the next year.

    1. rgasperson lm profile image89
      rgasperson lmposted 20 months agoin reply to this

      I was thinking about using the carboard over the winter and then  removing just enough for the vegetables to grow in the summer. I might try both ways just to see how well both ways work. I want to try a hay bale tomato next year as well.

    2. DrMark1961 profile image99
      DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

      They have had problems in California because of the warm weather and heavy mulch. When I lived in the midwest US hay bale tomatoes did well, as they do in the northeast of the US. You might be a pioneer in SC!

 
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