This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)

Why is financial stability so hard to obtain??

  1. kevin-adolf profile image60
    kevin-adolfposted 6 years ago

    Why is financial stability so hard to obtain??

  2. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 6 years ago

    1. There is no such thing as job stability anymore.
    Long gone are the days where a person could get a job with a company hold onto it for 30-30 years getting an annual raise of 3-5% like clock work. In the "golden era" a person pretty much knew how much they would earn each year and what they could expect for retirement. It made it easier to plan for the future. Once "job security" was removed it became difficult to plan too far ahead. We "out sourced" our long-term future for short term profits.

    2. Unstable Investment & Real Estate Markets

    There was a time a person could put their money in a moderate risk mutual fund or 401k and never bother looking at it until it was to time to retire. They knew each year they were getting anywhere from 8-10% annual growth on their investments. Home owners  looked at their home like a "nest egg" investment that was likely to double or tripple in value by the time they retired. Today many home owners are "under water", being foreclosed on, or simply walking away from a "bad investment". Interest rates remain low which means the banks aren't paying hardly anything to people with money in CDs and pass book savings accounts.

    3. Taxes continue to rise in one form or another along with cost of living.

    Even when the Feds cut income taxes the states and local taxes rise. Property taxes have continued to rise inspite of the fact that property values have gone down. Most major cities are crying broke. They're looking for more ways to extract money from their citizens (red light traffic cameras for "right turns"), traffic speeding cameras, increase in sales taxes, closing loop holes for deductions. There was a time in the 70s and earlier where interest off of credit cards and car loans were tax deductiable. Closing loop holes is the same as raising taxes!
    Food, Gas, Utilities, college tuitons, day care, and health care cost rise quicker than payroll raises. And God help you if you marry the wrong person! A spender and a saver will never live happily ever after. Divorce can be costly depending on which side of the fense you are on. Child support, alimony, and providing for kids period could put a dent in your pocketbook. According to a recent article published it's estimatted it takes about $350k to raise one child today from birth to age 18!

    Anyone who is not constantly looking for ways to increase their wealth or keeping a close eye on their investments with back up plans to move them as the market dictates is probably losing ground. Becoming rich is no longer the "American Dream", it's a requirement! The middle class is dying.
    There are only two groups of people left.
    Those who get what they want and those who take what they can get.
    Your mindset should be "I am CEO & President of Me, Inc." (even if you have a job). Always be planning and looking ahead because you are on your own. That's the world we live in today!

  3. profile image0
    Poetic Foolposted 6 years ago

    My guess is because it takes self-discipline and the ability to delay gratification, both things in short supply in many people today.  I know people with low incomes that live quite comfortably and I know wealthy people who are constantly worried about paying their bills this month.

    Financially stable people invariably demonstrate financial discipline by living within their means and are able to wait (read: save) to buy things they want or need rather than accrue debt to get it now.  The latter is also known as delayed gratification.

 
working