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If you make a living online, how do you diversify?

  1. theluckywriter profile image76
    theluckywriterposted 4 years ago

    If you make a living online, how do you diversify?

    Everyone always talks about the importance of diversification. How do you do it?

  2. WryLilt profile image90
    WryLiltposted 4 years ago

    Never keep all your eggs in one basket:

    -Traffic should come from multiple places. Search engines, Pinterest, Facebook, Twiter, backlinks, guest posts etc.
    -Content should be on different topics. Have multiple websites or accounts, with different types of content for different demographics.
    -Monetisation should vary based on traffic. You can monetise in multiple ways. Multiple affiliate and CPM advertising, your own eBooks, memberships, newsletter subscription lists etc.

    1. theluckywriter profile image76
      theluckywriterposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting. So far, my eggs are pretty much all in one basket (selling articles on Constant Content). It pays really well, and I don't have to personally worry about traffic, but I know it's dangerous to depend too much on one venue.

  3. Greekgeek profile image94
    Greekgeekposted 4 years ago

    It's a slow process.

    Here's something that worked for me.

    1. Find a site that I'm having fun and some success with. Build up content there. Pay careful attention to which pages, niches and writing styles are working for me, which aren't. Also look at other successful pages on the site, not to copy them, but to get ideas about what approaches tend to work and attract an audience.

    2. Build up until I'm reaching payout threshold most months. Then expand onto another site. Or start a blog. Experiment.

    3. Slowly expand to other writing platforms, other kinds of content (drawings on Zazzle, e.g., or YouTube videos, or whatever you have a knack for), other niches. These are experiments, testing the waters. If any start to take off, grab the line and reel in by doing more of that.

    1. theluckywriter profile image76
      theluckywriterposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I like that you start with fun. I enjoy writing, but I really quickly get burnt out on the social media aspect of online writing. Right now, I write and sell a lot of articles, which doesn't require promotion on my part.

  4. Skarlet profile image87
    Skarletposted 4 years ago

    Join Hubpages, Zujava and WebAnswers. Write Hubs on two or three subjects and then write "Leaves" on Zujava on the same subject. Link the articles together and add capsules from Amazon, ebay and Zazzle. You will earn from all of these avenues over time.
    Then answer as many questions as you can on WebAnswers. This site will quickly build up your AdSense earnings.

    After you have all three of these going, create about 3-5 blogs on subjects that you know very well. When you write articles on your blogs you can link them to your hubs. This way if you have caught the attention of someone who is reading your blog, but they are not going to click on anything, they will at least read your hub and you will earn from that. You can also place adds and products on your blog. The best way of having a high earning blog is to write an ebook that you can promote.

    1. theluckywriter profile image76
      theluckywriterposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I know that - eventually - I'm going to start a niche blog. But Webanswers, Zujava, Hubpages...I'm not sure that I could handle writing in so many places.

  5. Paul Corvan profile image75
    Paul Corvanposted 4 years ago

    I work as a freelance writer..I diversify my monthly income revenues by working for various content writing mills that pay upfront for each article that I submit--the pay can be as low as $2 to as high as $20 - $50 per article depending on the kind of project. At the same time, I also work with private clients who contact me directly to write articles for them.

    1. theluckywriter profile image76
      theluckywriterposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I also write articles. I only write for one place, though - Constant Content. Have you ever written for them? In my opinion, they are - by far - the best-paying and most professional content site.

    2. Paul Corvan profile image75
      Paul Corvanposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hello, luckywriter. Yeah, I also write for CC. What I liked about them is that you get to price your articles. I have sold several articles I had easily written in an hour or less for $40 or more. What I don't like about them is their editing process

    3. theluckywriter profile image76
      theluckywriterposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I know that a lot of people complain about CC's editing process. But I figure that if it weren't for their (sometimes ridiculously) high standards, then there's no way we'd be able to price an article for $40!

  6. las81071 profile image72
    las81071posted 4 years ago

    I am still trying to figure that out. I have not made really much of anything a few bucks here and there but I did some freebie trading and you could make money there but you have to spend a money also and it is quite time consuming. It could be fun if you like trying new products but you have to be very organized and have to take time to return items but you could make 50 bucks or so in a day if you work it correctly.

    1. theluckywriter profile image76
      theluckywriterposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting idea! Thanks! I guess part of the issue is time in vs money out. My long-term goal is 150 dollars per day. So far I'm doing well with content writing, but I want to add to my passive income.

 
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