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Barnga and the Game of Life: A Moment With Bill Reflection

Updated on September 4, 2013

A Cultural Game

Syria.

Iraq.

Afghanistan.

Iran.

Egypt.

Or we could go back in time.

Vietnam.

Korea.

Russia.

Germany.

Or we could hit overdrive and go further back.

England.

The Sioux Nation.

The Iroquois Nation.

What do they all have in common? Conflict for sure, but I believe there is a deeper connection that needs to be considered, and that is cultural differences.

A friend of ours mentioned a game that is available. I had not heard of it prior to one week ago but I have to tell you that once I heard of it, and read the rules, and talked to someone who had played it, I was instantly fascinated by it.

The game is Barnga and it is, quite frankly, a fascinating simulation of real-life situations that we face daily around the world.

Source

The Rules

Without becoming too specific, Barnga is a simple card game that is played in small groups of three or four people each. The first thing you need to realize is that language is not allowed while playing the game. Each group is allowed to use a farm animal sound as the only means of “talking” to fellow players. One group can only honk like a goose. One group snorts like pigs and one group moos like cows.

It is assumed by each group that all the groups are playing the same game, and there are rules on each table telling the groups how to play….however, there are slight variations in the rules from table to table, and the other groups do not know this.

Conflict happens when the winner in one group then shifts to another group to resume playing. Unknown to that “winner” the rules are different in the new group, and it becomes readily apparent that the new member does not understand what is going on and has no way of finding out….but they must continue playing.

A Moment With Bill about Love

Conflict Is Inevitable

Once it is discovered that the rules are different in a new group, players undergo a bit of a culture shock, and they then struggle to understand the differences and play effectively within their new culture group. Differences must be reconciled so that the game can continue. It is not an easy thing to do. There are struggles. There is anger. There is frustration and there are some who will quit and walk away rather than find a solution.

Sound familiar?

Please allow me to switch gears for a moment.

My wife and I were in downtown Olympia this past weekend for a yearly event called Harbor Days. Thousands upon thousands of people looking at exhibits, enjoying the perfect weather and, of course, eating.

Thousands upon thousands, and we only saw five blacks among those thousands. I find it amazing, and I have lived here for over twenty years, that the percentage of blacks in this Liberal city’s population is 1.4%. The Hispanic population is 1.6% of Olympia’s total population, and Native Americans make up 1.2%. To say there is a scarcity of cultural interaction would be a gross understatement.

Please allow me to switch gears once more.

I attended Seattle University back in the late 60’s. The university sits in what has always been known as the Central District of Seattle, and during the Sixties that district was primarily a black district. I clearly remember being nervous and yes, afraid, of walking around that area at night. I was a lilly white boy in a black neighborhood and all us lilly white boys and girls travelled in groups because of our fear. We did not know what to expect. We had no background to prepare us for the culture shock, and because of our lack of knowledge we suffered anxieties.

My sophomore year, as part of my Sociology class, my best friend and I started a reading program in the District. We went to local schools and explained that we would be tutoring twice a week, and we hung up flyers and spread the word as best we could. The first week two little black boys came to the center and became our first “students.” One month later we had ten, and by the end of the year we were being invited to the homes of our students for dinner with their families.

The cultural gap had been bridged. Two lilly white boys, too dumb enough to know, reached out across the cultural chasm and found a way.

All the colors of the rainbow
All the colors of the rainbow

Back to Barnga and Life

We certainly do have our problems, don’t we? There are days when it seems to me that being a citizen of the United States means being hated by half the world’s population, and that may not be an exaggeration. But how can that be? I have never met anyone in Syria. I have never met a citizen of Iraq or Egypt or North Korea. How can those countries hate ME if they have never met me? How can there be animosity towards a sixty-four year old writer in Olympia, Washington, when there has been no interaction?

I know one thing with every fiber of my being. Put me in a room with an average citizen of Syria and we will find a way to bridge that gap that yawns between our two countries. Serve us a meal, lock the door, and I guarantee you that we will leave that room, not hating each other, but rather embracing the fact that we are both human beings.

In the final analysis rhetoric is just rhetoric, words spouted by government hard-liners who are not interested in solutions but rather in a continual show of plumage. I’m bigger than you…I’m more powerful than you…I hate more than you hate….hurt me and I’ll hurt you…America love it or leave it…democracy is the only way!

Nonsense!

The only way, my friends, is understanding. Understand that we are all of the same race. We all laugh, bleed, weep and rejoice. We all are parents and children, aunts and uncles. We all have families and loved ones and friends and neighbors, and we all work, play, sweat and just try to exist in a world that seems, at times, intent on self-destruction.

The only answer
The only answer

I'll let the Youngbloods say it all

Make a Difference

One person at a time. I have no idea what is going to happen with the Syrian situation, nor do I have any insight how our problems with North Korea or Iraq or Iran will turn out. I have no control over those situations. Governments are in place to handle those weighty affairs of state, and one old writer in Olympia is far-removed from the world stage.

But…..

I can make a difference.

And so can you!

Open your doors. Open your minds. Open your arms and embrace the commonalities that we all share rather than training a myopic eye on the differences.

Does it all seem too much? Too complicated? Well then I will simplify it for you and put it in perspective so that all of you can understand.

Love!

My door is open. I will provide the food. All you have to do is walk through that door with a willingness to bridge the gap. I’m betting that you and I can make it happen. The world needs us to make it happen.

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Paula, it is something I look forward to. I believe in karma my friend...what goes around does come around, and I'm enjoying the hell out of the ride.

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Should that occur.....The "imaginary" place called Heaven, shall become reality. Those who haven't been" seeking & practicing" will need to be tolerated and taught.....and that should then be, a piece of cake!

      Must have been the plan all along.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It really is a fascinating game, Paula. It is an interesting way to see society and why so many problems seem to be insurmountable in today's world. Makes me wonder if we are ever going to learn to live together. :) Thanks Sis!

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      "Open your doors, your minds, your arms and embrace...." Oh, YES and Amen. It just doesn't get any better, clearer or simpler. GREAT game. UP+++ Pinned

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sue my friend, thank you for sharing that experience. Interesting what we come upon during our travels, isn't it? Lessons in culture!

      Wishing you a blessed week

      bill

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      Sueswan 4 years ago

      Hi Bill,

      In Memphis, I was in a MacDonald's where I was the only white person. A few of the patrons looked at me. I don't think they thought I shouldn't be there but they kind of looked surprised. Maybe they knew I was a tourist.

      Have a good week my friend.

      Voted up+++ and sharing

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rasma, I love your reflection on this....perhaps we have met them and didn't even know it. That really says it all, doesn't it?

      Thank you for stopping by. I hope you are well and I'm sending blessings your way.

      bill

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

      My first thought Bill while reading this was that even though I like you haven't met anyone from such countries like Iran or Syria just perhaps now living in Europe I have not even knowing it. You know on this side of the world it is an incredible phenomenon when a black person appears on the streets of Riga. It's like a black rose among the white but coming from NYC that's everyday to me. So I think we should just accept everyone for who they are and not condemn them because they are different. Hopefully the world will come to think this way also. I still feel that love, understanding, and compassion can make the world go around. Passing this on.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dahlia, you are so nice to read three of my hubs today. Thank you as always, and hugs and blessings coming your way.

      bill

    • livingsta profile image

      livingsta 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Very thoughtful hub Bill. I am sure each one of us can do something to break the barriers and create a difference in this world. Thank you for this Bill. I am sharing this. Have a good day my friend :-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vinaya, you have hit on the truth...one group imposing its opinion on the other. Thank you for that.

    • Vinaya Ghimire profile image

      Vinaya Ghimire 4 years ago from Nepal

      There are no wrong wars. Each group fight for its own rightful causes. Conflict appears because one group wants to impose its opinion on another.

      Thanks for sharing your reflection. I liked your deliberations.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Point well taken, Deb! Propaganda for sure....insidious and quite effective. :) Thanks for your reflections.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      When I wrote "An Appeal for World Peace," the same things were on my mind. It s not the people, it is the governments that poison minds. And I thought that propaganda was only used on citizens during wars...

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joe, you are eloquent as always...."take off the hoods and robes and light candles, not effigies or crosses...." beautiful sentiment and wisdom there buddy.

      Thank you as always. I wonder how long I have had this "gift".....I'm just glad I finally found it. :)

      Aloha

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brian, great points about social change. I can always count on you to have a wonderful perspective on the nature of society and man. These changes are worthwhile and hopeful. I have seen prejudice for far too many years my friend, and I am weary of it.

      As for terrorists....point well taken.

      Have a wonderful weekend Brian and thank you!

    • hawaiianodysseus profile image

      Hawaiian Odysseus 4 years ago from Southeast Washington state

      Bill, I grew up in Hawai'i for 18 years, and although I didn't realize it at the time, there was definitely a kind of discrimination going on...not one based on skin color or culture, per se, but one based on socioeconomic differences. Until I moved to the mainland when I was 18, I seriously lived under the misconception that all haoles--Caucasians--were wealthy. Even the hippies, I miscalculated, were sons and daughters rebelling against affluent parents back home in the "states."

      When I came to Washington, I was under the impression that there'd be no racial nonsense because I was as far north as one could get without being Canadian, and surely any state that fought in the Union would not foster racial prejudice.

      Wrong! I quickly learned differently. Truly, naivete saved me many a time, as I look back, from unnecessary conflicts with people I encountered on a daily basis.

      All that said, your hub triggers in me a remembrance of so many lessons learned along my journey thus far, the epitome of which might be this: Every race has its "N-tities." We make the greatest advances as a civilization when we take off the hoods and robes and light candles, not effigies or crosses, recognizing that we all have more in common than we initially realized.

      Thanks for sharing this intellectually and emotionally provocative piece, Bill. You have this wonderful gift of writing thinking man's pieces with heart and soul tenor.

      Aloha and mahalo!

      ~Joe

    • B. Leekley profile image

      Brian Leekley 4 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

      Up, Useful, and Interesting. Wise insights well expressed, as usual.

      Sometimes it's best to take the step from individual action to community action. In the Illinois rural county where I grew up, the population of a handful of towns had more or less 30% African Americans, Hispanics, and other minorities and all of the other dozens of towns were over 97% white. As best I know, the situation has not changed significantly. The statistics are not accidental. A factor is town and county planning, such as where to place Section 8 housing. Another factor is redlining. Another factor is the manipulations of real estate agents. And so on. Personal change comes at the personal and family level. Community and institutional change come at the community and institutional level.

      I see that happening where I live now in Kalamazoo, MI, a racially integrated small city. Many quite different churches have social concerns committees. Interfaith organizations, neighborhood organizations, labor organizations, issue-based organizations, and so on express their views to the city and county governments, which respond. Recently the city paid for a study of racial profiling by the traffic pollice. It found that black drivers are three times more likely to be stopped than white drivers and that black drivers are more likely than white drivers to be searched but are less likely to be carrying contraband. It's good that this pattern of injustice by the police (whether intentional or an outcome of a stats-driven approach) has been exposed. Now pressure from the townspeople is needed to see that it is undone. Statements by the Public Safety Chief are promising.

      I question your definition of terrorists, in a comment, as "those without reason or a willingness to negotiate". There are many cases in history of terrorists who negotiated quite effectively and who even became heads of state. And lack of reason is not a defining characteristic either. Stupid would-be terrorists fail their missions and are short lived.

      Your main point is right on. Barnga sounds like a very interesting game.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzie, isn't it interesting, the example you gave? In a loving relationship you still had a gap that could not be bridged. This obviously is not an easy thing to do for us humans. :)

      Thank you as always, Irish!

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      Suzanne Ridgeway 4 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi Bill,

      Yet again you hit the nail on the head. Bridging gaps has to be part of life. I have friends, had boyfriends and nearly married someone from a very different background, faith and lifestyle. I have seen the conflict in our own small island that has turned my stomach. We are all on this planet together and if we were all to make a change then the world would be a very different place for all races. Cheers my friend for another thought provoking piece!!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I don't have an answer for you. Terrorists, those without reason or a willingness to negotiate, can only be dealt with in one way and that is force. Sad but true. Thank you for your thoughts on this subject.

    • Ann1Az2 profile image

      Ann1Az2 4 years ago from Orange, Texas

      billybuc, once again you have made stop and think. I totally agree with your idea that we are all human beings and love is the answer. After all, Jesus called us to love one another. I also agree with you that the governments of the world control a lot of the conflicts that go on around us. I just keep thinking of what Prime Minister Netanyahu said when he was on the Hannity show awhile back. It is impossible to negotiate with terrorists. If these were people who valued human life, then yes, I could sit down with them and talk and eat with them. But how do we deal with monsters?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      vkwok, "we must do what we can to achieve peace everywhere".....why? Because the alternative is too scary to think about, that's why. :) Thanks buddy.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 4 years ago from Hawaii

      I agree that conflict is a part of life, and I think it will always be so. Still, we must do what we can to achieve peace everywhere.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael, I love to read your thoughts. I always come away richer because of your words. You are a gentle man, a real "human being" in the best sense of the word, and I am proud to be called your friend.

      peace and blessings to you always

      bill

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 4 years ago

      Hello billybuc.

      Wonderful ! What is your food supply, we're coming horde ?! Just kidding.

      Loaded with goodnes in your soul, you're stepping out into the world after first 5-6 years spent in the family of loving and living the honesty and truth, poor by any standard of living comparing to the" American poverty line"- and you're exposed to the strange never before heared voices forcefully attempting to create your opinion. ( First hand experience, honestly.)

      Why is evil so violently invading the simple? Did everyone fell so low that there is need to be " told" by selfish greedy inexperience, rarely telling the truth " leading experts?". You don't know them and you allow that box telling you, because everybody is being told so. And. what we are given- is our reality showing...

      Your teaching is excellent for implementation. It takes little of effort to will and to do. " One person at the time ." (Regardless of effort and period of duration, is achievable.)Perhaps someone need to be told again and again that the world is going to be different , when " you" ( not you personally ), but y o u out there , would choose to do to the others what you would like them to do to you, using little of brain to know that when you kill someone, the dead can't do it to you, you imbecile.

      ( This is not appropriate , Michael ; suppose I know?!)

      Voting up, interesting ,and useful.

      Have a nice, peaceful day and successful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Michelle! Have a wonderful evening.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you as always DDE....you are appreciated.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      PS, this is one game we can never strike out at.....our best efforts are always rewarded when it comes to understanding, compassion and love.

      blessings and a hug coming your way

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Maria and I hope your Thursday is an excellent day my friend.

      blessings always

      bill

    • profile image

      Midget38 4 years ago

      What the world needs is empathy! Well said!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      I was led to believe my growing up life in SA and you said it right what one believes is in ones minds, everything starts with every individual a well written hub on this title.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      Thanks again, Bill, for speaking out and reminding us to make a difference. If it does not begin with us, who then? Where will it begin?

      Each time we reach out a difference is made for sure.

      Reminding us to step up to the plate in this game can never been done to often.

      Angels are on the way to you on this lovely Thursday morning ps

    • profile image

      Maria Ruiz 4 years ago

      Amen to this!!!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, you and I both know that love is the answer, but I'm beginning to think it is a pipe dream. Too many people with too many agendas and too many issues. There will always be greed and the thirst for power....and so we need to keep spreading the word and living the message.

      blessings and love always

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, you put things in perspective quite nicely...cut through the b.s. and it is history repeating itself all over again. No my friend, I don't think our government will ever learn.

      Thanks for the perfect response.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

      While i was watching the evening news, i felt like we were back in the iraq era, asking congress to launch war on Syria. Will we never learn? I was hoping Obama would think more clearly, perhaps he has not. I wouldn't be interested in playing a game that changes the rules. We get enough of that without playing a game...

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Yes, Bill, the answer is just that simple, LOVE!!! Why is it so hard? I have this on my profile page about "The answer is simple: LOVE" I have had it there for over a year or so, and I pray that simple message will get through some how some day. We all belong to the human race, and we are brothers and sisters. Let us love each other now.

      Up and more

      Hugs and love, of course, Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      mylinda, I understand what you mean and thank you so much. It really is an interesting study in human nature.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hello W1totalk.....yes, my experience has been that people understand the lesson they are learning beyond the game.....and I do believe it definitely brings up underlying issues outside of the game.....I happen to think there is a cauldron inside most people just waiting for the right circumstances to make it bubble over.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Liz! I hope my writing never disappoints. :)

      bill

    • mylindaelliott profile image

      mylindaelliott 4 years ago from Louisiana

      I hate to vote interesting or say it any more since I saw someone on television say that 'interesting' meant not. BUT I did find this terribly interesting. I hadn't heart of the game either.

    • W1totalk profile image

      W1totalk 4 years ago

      Great article but I have two questions can people see the game beyond just a game, and second, does this game bring up other underlying issues outside of the context of this game?

      Everyone needs to be more aware but it is going to take time. Agasin, Great article.

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      Elizabeth Parker 4 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      I definitely had to vote this one up and share. I've never heard of the game Barnga, but the way you described it as it pertains to this hub and social issues at hand was fantastic. Your writing never disappoints! Thanks so much for sharing.

      Liz

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, if you had stopped after oink, oink, they would have rejected your comment as insufficient. :)

      Great story about the next door neighbor. I'll bet there was mutual understanding in those hugs. ...just sayin'

      Thank you my HP rebel!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Efficient yes, there always will be and yes, we always can...and the three biggest words...if we choose. :) Thank you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure Dora! Maybe we should all work on a little more understanding. :)

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 4 years ago

      Oink, Oink!! Note that those are four letter words. (Just slipping one

      by HP patrol.) Sneaky, huh??

      If you don't speak the language it can be difficult. We have had the opportunity to travel extensively in other countries. It afforded our family opportunities and foul ups that we remember fondly, today.

      In Germany, our next door neighbor was a very elderly woman who was

      almost completely deaf and she could not speak any English. I was a young mother of three who could speak maybe four words of German.

      We lived there for two years, and she and I would sit outside on nice days and "talk" for 20-30 minutes. When it came time for me to leave, I started out by waving goodbye. This lead to shaking hands which lead to hugging good bye. One day, she was not there anymore, and she never returned. I am very glad that I worked up the courage to start hugging her good bye, because I know that one of those good byes was a final good bye to the old woman who lived next door.

    • Efficient Admin profile image

      Efficient Admin 4 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      Sounds like in the beginning this would be hilarious and fun, but towards the end....not so much. Unfortunately there will always be hate filled people in the world and each of us can spread joy if we choose.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 4 years ago from The Caribbean

      Barnga makes a good point; you do too. There is nothing to say when we do not understand each other. Thank you for introducing it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, we are beyond complicated. LOL And sometimes I think we go out of our way to further complicate. I'm dealing with a son right now who can't seem to see the forest for the trees.

      Blessings to you my friend, and thank you

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheila, I try too, but I readily admit that I pre-judge just like everyone else. Guess I have a few things to work on still. :) Thanks for the visit.

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 4 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Barnga sounds like a game of life. Grunt at each other, get mad, storm off to find ways to kill each other, because of percieved differences. If we could just take the time to see where the other man is coming from, we'd see that we're not so different after all.

      I'm beginning to think that even if we were all carbon copies of each other we would still find something to fight about. You are right of course, person to person we will more often than not find common ground, even those who fought against each other in wars and come together again in peacetime, were able to become lifelong friends. The human animal is very complecated. An excellent and thought provoking write as always.

    • profile image

      sheilamyers 4 years ago

      Very well said! Too many times we end up pre-judging people based on what we've been told by other people or what we've seen from a few people from another group. I try very hard not to fall into that trap.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks a lot, Jeff! Blessings to you as well.

    • profile image

      JThomp42 4 years ago

      Great hub as usual Bill. Blessings my friend!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks buddy; xoxo back atcha!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vanilla from Finland. :)

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 4 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      XOXOXO

    • Made profile image

      Madeleine Salin 4 years ago from Finland

      I really hope we could learn more from each other. I wish you a wonderful day, my friend!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, it seems to be so, doesn't it? Too much fear and ignorance in society, and those two things will bring hate every single time.

      Thank you for your thoughts.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I knew I could count on your to add your two cents worth...turns out we got at least a dime's worth out of your two cents. :) Thanks buddy; it's always a pleasure having you here.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Made, thank you for sharing your experience in Finland. It is always helpful to learn of other cultures. By sharing stories like your we all learn.

      Good to see you my friend. Take care and thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Lizzy! I love your examples. I had one the other day where some young guy that looked like death warmed over held the door open for me and told me to have a safe and blessed day. Blew me away!

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

      It is often easier to hate than try to understand. Some very astute thoughts here that got my gray matter to shuffle around. Hate is a very strong word and it is thrown around with abandonment. The game sounds interesting...Conflict happens everywhere where there are people congregating.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, life is a constant learning gig and I love it. :) Thanks dear friend.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 4 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      You did good. I am the only white guy in my nuclear family. 60's to 80's I played ball. Every ball. Somehow teammates don't have a color. In Flagstaff when I was born minorities outnumbered whites. We lived by the tracks.

      I cannot even imagine what it would be like to live in a homogeneous culture. It must be very unnerving. Thanks for the deep thoughts.

      One last thing: Never be culture blind, it is the spice of life but always be hate blind.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, if I get people thinking about issues then I've done my job. I just want to raise awareness, and your comment tells me that I have done that. Thank you for your thoughts my friend. I love your introspection and your caring heart.

      bill

    • Made profile image

      Madeleine Salin 4 years ago from Finland

      I feel hated by many Finnish speaking people in Finland. Many of them think children don't need to learn Swedish in school, even if Swedish is an official language in Finland. That's what came to my mind, when I read this hub. There is too much hate in this world. Wonderful hub, and hugs from this vanilla person in Finland. :)

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      What a departure indeed, drbj! Let's hope it catches on and many play it and learn.

      Have a great day my friend and thank you!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, your last line is right on.....when will we ever learn? I hope soon.

      Thank you dear lady!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, it seems like such a simple lesson of common sense; one wonders why it is so difficult to practice in real life.....I believe you are right...fear of the unknown, and fear leads to hate and conflict and on and on we go.

      Thank you buddy. Blessings to you and yours and the love of friendship coming your way.

      bill

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      Liz Davis 4 years ago from Hudson, FL

      When I lived in Pittsburgh, my apartment was near a predominantly black neighborhood. My church was there (yes, I went to church--don't laugh!) as well as the farmer's market. I remember so many smiling faces and greetings from the people I passed, and wondered why I had been raised to avoid neighborhoods like this one. Fear is all in the mind! It's not reality. I also remember passing a young African-American man while walking my dogs in the park. He stopped exercising for a moment to say, "Hello, Ma'am". Seriously! Who does that? LOL Goes to show that stereotypes are only figments of our imaginations. Dangerous figments, to be sure, but useless and unnecessary, nonetheless.

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      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Hmmm. Can't wait to see what you picked up on this time!

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      Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I don't know, America has always opened arms to other cultures; even more so than we were aware of until recently. It use to be these people were very thankful and made America a better place adding their culture and their ways and we have all become one nation, but now other cultures want us to give up what has always been ours, yes, they have their and we give up ours and our government seems to be agreeing and forcing it and would change the rules to that game and even our servicemen have had their lips sealed about anything they believe and must trust un-Americans to cover their backs and if they shoot them in the back...well maybe that is another story nonetheless true. I just don't know anyone myself who is prejudice against blacks or hates anyone although there is a new fear of ones having rights that even protect them from being spied on like the rest of us who have been open wide to every thought and move.

      You always give food for thought bill whether it is the thought you were aiming for or not! lol

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, thank you. My hub on Friday had you in mind. Stay tuned. :)

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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      A new game, Bill, that is intellectual and perhaps humanizing? What a departure! Thanks for the heads-up.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, conflict is bound to arise. We used to get into fights over Monopoly. LOL I can just imagine if you can't speak and the rules keep changing.

      Thanks my friend and enjoy your day.

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      Mary Craig 4 years ago from New York

      No we are not perfect, but just as those two college boys, we need to not be afraid. We need to follow our hearts and live the love we feel no matter where, no matter how.

      You are right Bill "Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me".

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting.

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      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Bill, Barnga sounds like a fascinating game to play. I would imagine it starts out with a lot of laughter, having to use animal sounds. I can definitely see how that could also lead to frustruation. Frustration often leads to anger.

      Using Barnga as the segue into your ultimate point is brilliant! And, of course, The Youngbloods is the perfect song to drive your point home. Great hub, my friend!

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      Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

      My door is open my friend and very willing to try new things and accept all. However, I am not perfect and know I could do better at times though, too. Thank you for always giving me that gentle reminder. And that game you mention in the beginning does sound quite interesting and also agree conflict would arise. Again thanks and now wishing you a great day ahead.

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      Mr Archer 4 years ago from Missouri

      Bill, you've hit the nail on the head once again. We "hate" that which we do not know or understand; we fear the unknown; and we are unwilling to get outside our comfort zone in order to bridge that gap. The world may be getting smaller via electronics but we are becoming more and more individualized and compartmentalized to the point where we cease to look our neighbor in the eye and greet them.

      We are becoming clans again.

      What do clans do? Fight one another. Why? Because everyone else is not clan, family, friend, known.

      I totally agree, we must build a bridge and extend a hand to another human being because they ARE human beings first and foremost. And as human beings we will survive together or we will fail as individuals.

      Great job Bill. Blessings to you and Bev. And may I say much love to you, my friend. Take care.